Make it a tasty fall by planting your own veggie garden with root crops, garlic and greens | Home/Garden

Now that we are moving into the cooler weather of October, it’s time to start seriously thinking about your fall vegetable garden.

If you don’t keep your vegetable garden productive through the winter, you are missing out on some of the most delicious vegetables we can grow. There is an amazing selection that can only be grown here during the cool season from October to May.

Another reason for putting in a fall vegetable garden now is the mild weather. No matter how much you love gardening, you have to admit that it’s more enjoyable when the daytime highs are in the 70s rather than the 90s. And during the cool season, we generally have fewer insect, disease and weed problems to deal with compared to summer gardens.

Make your bed

Whether you are planting into an existing vegetable garden or starting a new one, you must pay careful attention to bed preparation to ensure success. Before planting, do a thorough job of removing any weeds that may have grown in the bed, or remove existing turf if this is a new bed. Spray existing weeds or turf with glyphosate herbicide to kill the weeds before removing them. Check the label for waiting periods between treating and planting.

Turn the soil to a depth of 8 inches and spread a 2- to 4-inch layer of organic matter over the bed (compost, composted or processed manure, soil conditioner, grass clippings). Sprinkle a general purpose fertilizer over the organic matter following package directions. For more specific information on what fertilizer to use, have your soil tested through your local LSU AgCenter Extension office. Finally, thoroughly incorporate everything into the soil of bed.

If you prefer to garden in raised beds, which are generally less labor-intensive and easier to manage, kill and remove any weeds or lawn grass growing (use glyphosate) where the beds will be built. Build the raised beds about 8 to 12 inches deep and 3- to 4-feet wide (your choice of materials, pressure treated lumber, brick, cinder blocks, etc.). The length is up to you.

Fill them with a blended topsoil or garden soil mix you purchase in bags from local nurseries or in bulk from local soil companies. Incorporate fertilizer into the soil, but you generally will not need to add organic matter to a typical topsoil or garden soil mix.



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It’s time to plant broccoli into the fall vegetable garden. Related vegetables include cauliflower, kale, romanesco, kohlrabi and collards.




Cole crops

Cole is the old term for cabbage (as in coleslaw — cabbage salad). Cole crops include cabbage and several other related vegetables.

Broccoli is an easy-to-grow and productive fall vegetable. Transplants available at area nurseries may be planted now through late-October, spacing plants 12 to 18 inches apart in rows or beds. The 12-inch spacing will produce smaller heads but total production is greater.

Broccoli heads are harvested when the largest flower buds in the head are about the size of the head

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Planting hurricane lilies and other bulbs in Florida

By Brenda Daly
 |  For the Times-Union

Tulip, daffodil and hyacinth bulbs are at the garden center now. Do I plant my spring bulbs immediately?

You are learning why gardening in Florida is so different. Many of the things that are available at some garden centers are not meant for Florida’s warm, humid climate.

Unfortunately, all those bulbs need a chilling period. Tulip, large flowered daffodil and hyacinth bulbs can be grown as annuals in Florida, but must be pre-chilled. A separate refrigerator would be ideal so you can control the temperature and keep them away from ripening fruit, as ethylene gas affects the bloom. Even then, if we have a warm spring, the blooms may not last long.

One bulb you might find at the garden center is Paperwhite narcissus. They are sold nationally as an annual to force inside. Paperwhites are a perennial in Florida and will naturally bloom around Christmas when planted in your yard.

Check out local plant nurseries for suitable bulbs. If you order from national catalogs, check the growing conditions needed. Zone 9 in California has different growing conditions than our zone 9 in Florida. One bulb you might find is Lycoris (hurricane lilies), which are blooming now. They are called hurricane lily because they bloom in late summer or fall when we are getting tropical system rains. Local nurseries frequently carry these bulbs. Lycoris radiata is the classic red hurricane lily. Lycoris aurea is also called golden spider lily. Both have a bare flower stalk that appears first and then the leaves grow through the winter.

Other bulbs that are blooming now, with our rainy summers are the rain lilies, the pink and yellow ones. They seem to bloom in the summer and fall with cycles of rain. White rain lilies include spring blooming Florida natives of Zephyranthes atamasca and Zephyranthes simpsonii. The other rain lilies are native to the southwest United States, and Central and South America. All will self-seed and naturalize. The two main Genera are Zephyranthes and Habranthus. There are many species of rain lilies and many hybrids. Hybrids do self-seed, but their offspring will be different. For instance, I started with dark pink hybrid Zephyranthes, but now I have lots of offspring that are pale pink.

Daffodils normally need winter chilling, but these low chill varieties will bloom in Florida: Carlton, February Gold, Trevithian, Erlicheer and Paperwhites. Other zone 9 small flowered Narcissus in the Tazetta class might be worth a try.

The bulbs are going to have a dormant period, with no above ground growth. You also need to let their leaves naturally age from green to brown for their dormant period. If you have a manicured landscape, you might want to camouflage their aging leaves. You also need to remember where you planted them, so you don’t damage the bulbs by digging or overwatering them while dormant.

One method is to plant them in a low ground cover, where you can gently rake the brown leaves away

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“Grow what you want to eat” local gardeners focus on organization, practical planting wins new Spokane Interstate Fair garden category

For Gabriele Tilley, successful gardening is about beauty and smart use of space.

Tilley’s garden, which is located in front of her Long Lake home, is a mix of flowers, vegetables, and ornamental plants all neatly organized in raised beds. Tilley has been cultivating her small garden patch for over a decade and normally would have submitted much of what she grows to the Spokane County Interstate Fair for judging.

After this year’s fair was moved online, the organizers developed a new category to allow gardeners to participate, by allowing them to submit photos and designs of their entire garden for judging. Tilley was the inaugural winner, garnering praise from the judges for her neat, organized plan and productive use of a small space.

She said the secret to her gardening success is likely her focus on plants she enjoys.

“Grow what you want to eat, and then go from there,” she said.

Her garden includes kale, eggplant, tomatoes and basil, often sharing raised beds with flowers. She said mixing the plants attracts bees and other pollinating insects, and it allows her to maximize space.

Everything in her garden is planted in a raised bed and much of it is held up by home made frames. Her pumpkins are draped over A-frames she made from zip ties and hog wire and her tomato crates are built from rebar. The A frame has allowed her to keep her gourds and pumpkins neat and organized, and provide support for sunflowers, which grow through several A-frames.

She said the neat arrangement of raised beds, the grass clippings she layers on the paths between them and the mixed plants also creates a space she wants to spend time in, a place she can create and relax in for hours.

“For me, it’s meditative,” she said.

Tilley said her garden also is a good place to start plants for the Friends of Manito, an non profit that supports Manito Park in Spokane. Tilley volunteers for the organization and has owned a pet sitting business and has worked as an orthodontics technician.

She said she’s been gardening for 30 years and has picked up many tips and tricks to make her own garden successful, but added there’s always more to learn. She recalled a recent issue with hundreds of volunteer pumpkin plans she accidentally grew after she composted pumpkins. She said the seeds must have germinated at some point and in the spring as she was constantly surprised by unexpected pumpkins.

“Gardening is still an adventure,” she said. “You make mistakes, but then you learn from them.”

For runner-up garden category winner Barb Goehner, gardening is about sharing what she grows with others and the joy of being outdoors.

“People have other joys, but I love this,” she said.

Goehner normally enters 30 to 40 vegetables in the fair every year, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the reduced number of entries accepted into the fair this year, she only entered a pumpkin and photos

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BACKYARD BLISS | Utilising companion planting in your urban garden | Port Macquarie News

life-style, life, Hannah Moloney, Good Life Permaculture

As our spring crops are gradually going in, we’re making space for some sister action to take place, all three of them – corn, pumpkin and beans – together like they should be. These three plants are a guild of plants traditionally grown in Native Amerrican agriculture. Dating back around 5000 years, it is so successful, it’s now on of the most popular “pin ups” for companion planting around the world. The symbiotic relationship between these three plants is particularly wonderful, here’s how it all works. Structurally, the corn does what it does best, and grows tall and straight providing the perfect climbing pole for beans to grow up. The beans provide nitrogen to the soil, being heavy feeders, both the corn and pumpkin lap this up for their own use. Meanwhile the squash (generally a type of pumpkin) sprawls in and around the base of these two plants acting as a living mulch with its big, shady leaves. It also helps suppress or slow the growth of weeds due to this pattern of growth. Apparently corn lacks the amino acids lysine and tryptophan, which the human body needs to make proteins and niacin, but beans contain both and therefore corn and beans together help provide a balanced diet. And of course, if one of the crops fail (due to pest or disease) it is ‘backed up’ by another two – so you never go hungry, clever. From the perspective of the plant’s root profiles, these three plants all have different root ball shapes where they inhabit different levels of soil meaning they’re not competing for nutrients. So clever, so sophisticated. The other great thing about this guild (there are many) is that you can plant it on any scale, so even if you have a small urban garden (like we do) you can still have a productive patch in a relatively small space. We’ve allocated a garden bed roughly 5 metres by 3 metres, which will include around 16 corn and bean plants and two sprawling pumpkin plants. However we’ve also planted it in smaller beds. Being in a cool temperate climate, we’re yet to establish this year’s three sisters garden outside, but we thought we’d get a head start and get the corn and pumpkins going inside first. They’ll be moving outside soon, where we’ll direct sow the beans at the base of each corn plant. When you’re planting this guild, be sure to give the corn a head start as the beans grow so fast they’ll quickly catch up to the height of the corn. If you’re in a warmer climate, you can direct sow all three seeds at the same time straight into your garden area, they’ll all go gang busters. Where ever you are, make sure your soil has lots of food, like manure and compost, as corn and pumpkin are hungry plants and require healthy, nutritious soil to thrive. Utilising companion planting in your urban garden or

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BACKYARD BLISS | Utilising companion planting in your urban garden | The Canberra Times

life-style, life, Hannah Moloney, Good Life Permaculture

As our spring crops are gradually going in, we’re making space for some sister action to take place, all three of them – corn, pumpkin and beans – together like they should be. These three plants are a guild of plants traditionally grown in Native Amerrican agriculture. Dating back around 5000 years, it is so successful, it’s now on of the most popular “pin ups” for companion planting around the world. The symbiotic relationship between these three plants is particularly wonderful, here’s how it all works. Structurally, the corn does what it does best, and grows tall and straight providing the perfect climbing pole for beans to grow up. The beans provide nitrogen to the soil, being heavy feeders, both the corn and pumpkin lap this up for their own use. Meanwhile the squash (generally a type of pumpkin) sprawls in and around the base of these two plants acting as a living mulch with its big, shady leaves. It also helps suppress or slow the growth of weeds due to this pattern of growth. Apparently corn lacks the amino acids lysine and tryptophan, which the human body needs to make proteins and niacin, but beans contain both and therefore corn and beans together help provide a balanced diet. And of course, if one of the crops fail (due to pest or disease) it is ‘backed up’ by another two – so you never go hungry, clever. From the perspective of the plant’s root profiles, these three plants all have different root ball shapes where they inhabit different levels of soil meaning they’re not competing for nutrients. So clever, so sophisticated. The other great thing about this guild (there are many) is that you can plant it on any scale, so even if you have a small urban garden (like we do) you can still have a productive patch in a relatively small space. We’ve allocated a garden bed roughly 5 metres by 3 metres, which will include around 16 corn and bean plants and two sprawling pumpkin plants. However we’ve also planted it in smaller beds. Being in a cool temperate climate, we’re yet to establish this year’s three sisters garden outside, but we thought we’d get a head start and get the corn and pumpkins going inside first. They’ll be moving outside soon, where we’ll direct sow the beans at the base of each corn plant. When you’re planting this guild, be sure to give the corn a head start as the beans grow so fast they’ll quickly catch up to the height of the corn. If you’re in a warmer climate, you can direct sow all three seeds at the same time straight into your garden area, they’ll all go gang busters. Where ever you are, make sure your soil has lots of food, like manure and compost, as corn and pumpkin are hungry plants and require healthy, nutritious soil to thrive. Utilising companion planting in your urban garden or

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Pottawatomie Garden Club to do fall planting Sept. 16

Earlier this summer, a group of the Pottawatomie Garden Club members gathered to keep the River Corridor in downtown St. Charles looking beautiful. This group has met several times this summer, most recently Aug. 12.

The club also will be planting colorful flowers downtown this fall.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

On Wednesday, Sept. 16, club members will meet at 9 a.m. at the Municipal Building, 2 E. Main St. for the “Planting of the Bridges.” Volunteers will help plant the beautiful fall flowers selected for the Main Street and Illinois bridges. Bring your own garden gloves, knee pad and trowel. Plants will be provided.

On Monday, Sept. 28, the club’s monthly meeting will begin at noon at Baker Memorial United Methodist Church in St. Charles. The topic will be “Recycling Know-How” with SCARCE (School & Community Assistance for Recycling and Composing Education).

It is an award-winning environmental education nonprofit dedicated to creating sustainable communities. This is accomplished through innovative and hands-on education programs for the schools and organizations, demonstrating care for our natural resources. Executive Director Kay McKeen started SCARCE (formerly SCRAP) in 1990. She will share all you need to know about recycling beneficially.

For information, visit www.pottagardenclub.org or www.facebook.com/pottagardenclub/.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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Lafayette man accused of planting hidden camera in bathroom takes plea deal

Ryan Pacheco (Boulder County Sheriff’s Office)

A Lafayette man accused of planting a hidden camera in a woman’s bathroom has taken a plea deal in his case.

Ryan Gabriel Pacheco, 24, pleaded guilty Friday to second-degree burglary and invasion of privacy for sexual gratification, according to court records.

Prosecutors dismissed one additional burglary count, an additional invasion of privacy count and one count of attempted burglary in exchange for the plea.

Pacheco, who is out of custody on a $1,000 cash bond, is set for sentencing on Nov. 6.

According to an arrest affidavit, a woman called Lafayette police in February after she found a hidden camera in a basement bathroom at the home she was renting.

The woman told police she suspected Pacheco, though the nature of her relationship with him and the reason she suspected it was Pacheco was redacted in the affidavit. Police told the woman and her roommate not to alert Pacheco or the landlord about the camera until they could investigate.

The next day, the roommate saw Pacheco at the front door before he ran off. A neighbor also told police she saw Pacheco at the door before he fled.

Police went to Pacheco’s house and arrested him later that day. Pacheco admitted he had been at the women’s house, but said he was there to play with a dog.

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Vegetable Gardening For Beginners – Planting a Beautiful Vegetable Garden at Home

Are you looking to plant your very own vegetable garden but you're not sure how to get started? Planting a healthy vegetable garden provides so many benefits including an abundance of healthy organic food and saving thousands on your grocery bills. I don't know about you but I still remember the days when a tomato from the supermarket tasted like a tomato, not anymore unfortunately. Let's look at some vegetable gardening for beginners tips to help get you started today.

Vegetable Gardening For Beginners – Tips
Preparation is the key to growing a beautiful and healthy vegetable garden. Planning is critical for setting up a vegetable garden that you can harvest every daily. Vegetable gardening for beginners does not have to be difficult with the correct planning.

First you must decide on your plot, the area for your garden. The ideal spot is somewhere that receives plenty of morning sun and protection from the elements such as wind. Although you maybe limited with the space you have available don't be discouraged as you will be shocked at how much you can grow by maximizing the space you have. Ensure there is sufficient drainage for water run off.

Importance Of Soil Quality
One of the most common vegetable gardening for beginners tips you will hear is never underestimate soil quality. Soil is the life line of a garden do not underestimate it's importance. You must ensure that your soil preparations include checking the soil and preparing it by testing its pH levels. The ideal pH level for your soil is 6.5, if you do not have a test kit you can go to your local garden outlet and let them test it for you.

Don't stress if your levels are out of whack for the moment, you can purchase garden lime that will improve the pH levels of your soil. In a nutshell your pH levels will determine how much nutrients your vegetables will be able to receive.

Preparing Your Plot
Dig your plot and turn your soil over, ensure you dig into a depth of about 12 "(30cm) and remove any weeds you find by hand. Avoid using weed killers and they can effect your soil structure and levels. Once your pH levels are in healthy range, wait 4-5 weeks before you begin planting.

The vegetables that you grow will dependent on where you live. Speak to your gardening outlet that will buy seedlings from for the most suitable vegetables.
Ask about purchasing some organic fertilizer which will be the life blood of your garden. Organic fertilizers such as animal manure, blood and bones as well as compost are terrific choices for providing essential nutrients and moisture.

Growing Vegetables Year Round
The key to planting a successful garden is to have vegetables that you can harvest year round. By doing this you can rotate different vegetables to help ensure the health of your gardening by limiting pests and diseases. One of the most common vegetable gardening for beginners mistakes is …

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Planting A Fall Vegetable Garden

If you're like most gardeners, you probably consider August to be the tail end of the growing season. The truth of the matter is that it's a great time to start your fall garden.

A fall garden can produce excellent vegetables and extend your crops long after your spring planted garden is finished. The vegetables you harvest from the fall garden are often sweeter and milder than those grown over the summer.

What type of vegetables you plant in your fall garden will depend on the space you have, as well as the types of vegetables you like. Be sure that you plant vegetables with the shortest growing season, this will increase the chances they will be full grown and harvested before the hard frost sets in. Starting your seeds indoors the first week of July will also give you a good head start.

Most seed packages will be labeled "early season", or you can find the seeds that are labeled with the fewest days to harvest. Since seeds are not usually kept in stock towards the end of summer, you will probably need to purchase seeds for your fall garden in the spring. You can also find them easily online at places Gurneys.com.

Even vegetables that like the heat of summer, like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and peppers, will produce nicely until harder frosts hit, which can be fairly late in the year in certain areas.

There are certain vegetable plants that normally stop producing towards the end of summer. These include snap-beans, summer squash, and cucumbers. Even these, if planted in the middle of summer, can produce nicely until the first frosts arrive. Many hardy vegetables will grow with temperatures as low as 20 degrees.

If you have root plants such as beets, carrots or radishes, that have the tops killed by a freeze, you can save them by applying a heavy layer of mulch.

For fall gardening you need to know approximately when the first hard frost normally hits your particular area. The Farmer's Almanac is a great resource for this type of information. It will give you specific dates and is fairly accurate most of the time. You also need to know approximately how long your plants will take to mature. As I said, this is available by reading the individual seed packets.

To prepare the soil for your fall garden, the first thing you will need to do is clear out leftover summer crops and weeds. If you leave the leftover vines and plant debris from your summer crops, bacteria and diseases can develop from these leftover remnants. If your spring plants were not fertilized heavily, you may want to spread a few inches of compost over the garden next.

Once that is done you will need to till the soil and wet it down. Now simply wait 24 hours and your ready to plant.

All too often gardeners will shy away from planting a fall garden, to avoid dealing with frosts. I can tell you …

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Enjoy Mild June Days While Planting & Pruning in the Garden

Longer daylight hours and typically cool June weather means this month is the ideal time to plant, prune and make changes in the yard.

Plant Perennials for Summer Flowers: Pick up several of these easy-care perennials are at your local nursery and plant them in June: Spanish lavender, Echinacea, salvia, yarrow and California native iris. All love summer heat and full sun and once planted, they'll continue to bloom through most of fall.

Annuals Add Summer Color Too: Some flowers only bloom in summer and then they're gone for the year. For great splashes of summer color, add these plants to your garden: wax begonias, zinnias, nasturtiums, petunias, marigolds and snapdragons. Because they are temporary, all require little or no maintenance.

Add Succulents To Your Landscape: Succulents provide an interesting contrast to typical garden plants and shrubs. True to their desert origin, they require little watering. Easy-to-care-for succulents include jade plants, blue senecio and agave and aloe varieties. Don't forget colorful and interestingly shaped cactus.

Start A Container Garden: For those without a lot of space for an in-ground flower garden, container gardens provide a beautiful alternative. Start with a well-draining large pot and the right soil. The larger the pot, the less chance your plants will dry out. Place a coffee filter under the drain hole so only water, not soil, runs out. Use an organic potting soil mix especially designed for containers. Just about any flower will work well in a container. Choose flowers based on how much sunlight the container location will receive.

Revamp Your Landscape: While the weather is still mild, now is the time to remove poor performing plants or shrubs. Consider reducing or removing your lawn. Replace your current landscape with native, drought-tolerant plants and ornamental rocks. There are plenty of do-it-your-self plans and design ideas available online.

Check Your Irrigation System: Since you will be watering more in the coming months, check your irrigation system for any line breaks. A drip irrigation system makes the best use of water since water is applied slowly allowing it to reach deep into even the most densely packed soil. A drip system is also more efficient than an overhead spray system because there is no evaporation or runoff.

Protect Fruit From Birds: If birds feast on the fruit in your trees, place bird netting on the top of trees or add brightly colored streamers in the branches to keep the birds away.

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