Country Garden Forest City Released the Ecological Development Action Plan to Create a Green and Ecological Future City

JOHOR BAHRU, Malaysia, Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — On 21st September, Country Garden Forest City published Forest City Ecological Development Action Plan, which outlined the mission of Forest City ecological development, and clearly defined the goals and targets of eco city development, operation and management in phases. Following this plan, Forest City will carry out green infrastructure development as a foundation, leverage on high-tech industries to enhance urban economic development, and eventually become a green and vibrant city with diversified industries and cultures. On the same day, Forest City Eco Museum Phase 1 exhibition hall was officially opened. 

Forest City Eco Museum

The Forest City Eco-Museum, which is located beside the beach of Forest City, is open for public today. The eco museum adheres to an open concept and breaks through the limitations of traditional museums. It integrates outdoor greeneries, ecological corridor, seagrass conservation areas, exhibition halls and laboratories into one system, and creates an immersive experience for the visitors with a real scene eco system.

Phase 1 of the museum, comprising of an exhibition hall, a laboratory building and part of the eco corridor, have already been completed. Over 100 biological samples are displayed in the exhibition hall to showcase the rich marine ecosystem around Forest City, its sustainable development mission and the environmental protection achievements over the past years. The laboratory will be used as a research and education center to facilitate the R&D and educational works of the research institutions and universities around Forest City. Meanwhile, phase 2 construction has started while phase 3 is under planning.

Forest City Eco Museum Phase 1 Exhibition Hall

On the same day, Forest City published Forest City Ecological Development Action Plan which outlined the goals and targets of eco city development, operation and management from the start of project development in 2014 towards the future. Following this plan, Forest City will carry out green infrastructure development as a foundation, leverage on high-tech industries to enhance urban economic development, and eventually become a green and vibrant city with diversified industries and cultures.

The newly published Forest City Ecological Development Action Plan encompasses three phases, for each phase, there will be a set of development indicators set out from the areas of “Industry, City, and People” in urban operations.

Phase 1, from 2014 to 2019, is the basic stage of the urban green ecosystem development, applying environmental concept throughout the urban planning, development, construction, and city operations. Forest City has never stopped its investment in green development, from the environmental assessment at the beginning of project, to multiple environmental measures such as the set-up of double layer silt curtain during the reclamation work, the establishment of enterprise-level environmental management system, mangrove conservation via satellite sensing and daily patrols, seagrass conservation and hydrological dynamic monitoring, just to minimize the environmental impact during the development. Forest City has also established long-term cooperation with research institutions and universities to carry out scientific monitoring and analysis of the natural environment around Forest City, providing scientific support for effective recovery and maintenance of the ecosystem.

Since 2016,

Read more

Gardeners should plan now for Washington’s hotter, drier climate

Until rain began falling Friday, the only thing coming from the skies across western Washington lately has been ash. Anxious homeowners have been glancing at their landscaping the last couple of weeks and filling online garden forums with questions about drought, fires and ash.

But garden experts say there’s little to worry about — if you’ve been caring for your plants. And there are steps to take to make a drought resistant garden.

Western Washington is experiencing “abnormally dry” weather, according to the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System, a collaborative government effort that monitors weather conditions for the Columbia River basin and surrounding region, including all of Washington state.

Central Washington is experiencing a moderate to severe drought, according to DEWS. Many parts of Oregon are in extreme drought.

Get used to it, experts say. It’s climate change.

“It’s definitely gotten hotter,” said Linda Chalker-Scott, a Washington State University professor, urban horticulturist and author. “Maybe not every summer. But when you look at long term trends, we know that the average temperature is going up in summer, and we’re getting less rainfall.”

There’s nothing from stopping homeowners from watering their thirsty landscapes, except maybe the water bill. But, Chalker-Scott suggests planning and planting landscapes that are less dependent on supplemental water.

The weather has changed to the point where spring planting season is something to be avoided unless gardeners are installing a vegetable garden or putting in annuals, she said.

“Spring is a really bad time to plant. Summer is the only worst time,” Chalker-Scott said. “The tree is not able to put out a lot of root growth because there’s just not enough water to support that.”

Instead, fall and winter are the seasons that are best for planting trees, shrubs and perennials. She suggests mid-October as the start of the planting season. Even deciduous plants, those that lose their leaves, will grow roots during fall and winter.

Fall colors might be arriving sooner than usual, said garden designer and author Sue Goetz.

“Some trees kick out fall color early if they are super stressed,” Goetz said. “If trees are stressed, it is usually because they are newly planted in the last few years and just need to get their roots deep in the ground.”

Homeowners concerned about fire should concentrate on where they plant more than what they plant. Chalker-Scott debunks lists of “flammable plants” put out by governments and other agencies.

“It’s just not really based on science,” she said. “It’s based on anecdote, just conjecture, nothing else.”

Fire defense experts suggest creating a defensible space around homes that might be subject to wildfires.

Homeowners concerned about air quality should plant more trees, Goetz said.

“It is well studied how dramatically trees can help reduce air pollution,” she said. “So, I imagine our large trees are working hard.”

Keeping plants healthy means avoiding bare earth, Chalker-Scott said. The best way to do that is with ground cover or mulch. She recommends wood chips, not bark. Chips

Read more

Postal Service’s plan to send face masks to Americans allegedly nixed by White House

The United States Postal Service drafted plans to distribute 650 million reusable cotton face masks to Americans last spring — five to every household — as the country grappled with the first wave of the coronavirus outbreak, according to USPS internal documents obtained by a watchdog group.



a man holding a sign: A U.S. Postal Service worker wearing a protective mask and face shield removes mail from a dropbox in San Francisco, Calif., Aug. 17, 2020.


© David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Postal Service worker wearing a protective mask and face shield removes mail from a dropbox in San Francisco, Calif., Aug. 17, 2020.

The draft was among nearly 10,000 pages of USPS documents turned over to American Oversight in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. The emails, memos and legal correspondence released illustrate how the agency struggled to address the pandemic in its earliest weeks, as front-line postal workers feared for their safety and executives worried about disruptions to the agency’s service and funding.


MORE: Gulf between Trump and doctors on mask wearing gets wider

According to the draft release, the agency, working with the Department of Health and Human Services, would first send masks to areas with high COVID-19 transmission rates at the time — including Louisiana’s Orleans and Jefferson parishes; King County, Washington; New York; and Wayne County, Michigan.

“Our organization is uniquely suited to undertake this historic mission of delivering face coverings to every American household in the fight against the COVID-19 virus,” the then-postmaster general and CEO, Megan J. Brennan, said in the prepared release.

The White House declined to comment on the draft proposal, referring questions to the Department of Health and Human Services.

An HHS spokesperson said roughly 600 million of the total 650 million masks have been delivered under Project America Strong as “part of a multi-prong approach to re-opening the American economy while limiting the spread of COVID-19.”

A spokesman for the Postal Service did not respond to a message seeking comment.



a man in a suit and tie: Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of Health and Human Services,, Robert Kadlec, on Capitol Hill, Sept. 16, 2020.


© Anna Moneymaker/New York Times, Pool via AP
Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of Health and Human Services,, Robert Kadlec, on Capitol Hill, Sept. 16, 2020.

“There was concern from some in the White House Domestic Policy Council and the office of the vice president that households receiving masks might create concern or panic,” one administration official told The Washington Post about the proposal.

Instead, the initiative, announced by the Trump administration under the “Project: America Strong,” was a more targeted program to send face masks to critical infrastructure sectors, companies and health care, community and religious organizations.

The program is no longer accepting new requests for face masks, according to its website, and instead encourages applicants to purchase face masks elsewhere or make their own.

President Donald Trump said on Aug. 12 that the government would also send 120 million face masks to schools ahead of the fall.

“The Postal Service connects every single person in American, and the president could have used it for public health, but he didn’t,” Austin Evers, the executive director of American Oversight, told ABC News, calling out Trump. “An opportunity to deliver science-based public health

Read more

White House nixed Postal Service plan to send face masks to every household in US: report

The White House rejected a U.S. Postal Service proposal to send face masks to every household in the U.S., according to The Washington Post.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reportedly suggested the idea in April, proposing five reusable masks be delivered to every residential address and prioritizing areas with the worst coronavirus outbreaks. The Postal Service also prepared a news release saying it would send the first shipments to Louisiana’s Orleans and Jefferson parishes, according to a draft obtained by the Post. Masks would then go to King County, Wash., Wayne County, Mich., and New York.

However, the White House reportedly vetoed the plan, instead creating the Project America Strong initiative. The $675 million initiative has distributed about 600 million masks to vulnerable and critical sectors thus far, according to HHS.

“There was concern from some in the White House Domestic Policy Council and the office of the vice president that households receiving masks might create concern or panic,” an administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity told the Post.

Emails obtained by the Post also indicated that postal workers felt they were left without protection as the pandemic intensified.

“I literally was on the phone today with many of my members screaming at me to do something [and] I don’t want to die,” one union official wrote, noting that postal workers were confirmed to have contracted the virus in late March. “You cannot expect the unions to convince the employees that if they come to work they have nothing to worry about.”

Although the Postal Service said a week later that it would increase its stock of personal protective equipment, then-Postmaster General Megan Brennan continued receiving frantic correspondence, the Post noted. One woman, who said her spouse was a mail carrier in Pennsylvania, demanded to know “WHY IN GOD’S NAME ARE THEY DELIVERING UNESSENTIAL MAIL to EVERY HOUSE in a HIGHLY INFECTED AREA!!!!”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBarr criticizes DOJ in speech declaring all agency power ‘is invested in the attorney general’ Military leaders asked about using heat ray on protesters outside White House: report Powell warns failure to reach COVID-19 deal could ‘scar and damage’ economy MORE has repeatedly questioned the broad agreement among experts that masks work to slow the spread of the virus.

He has rarely worn one himself and has spoken at rallies with hundreds of largely maskless attendees.

The U.S. has recorded almost 200,000 deaths related to the coronavirus, along with more than 6.6 million cases, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Updated at 1 p.m.

Source Article

Read more

White House abandoned plan to deliver 650 million face masks across U.S., report says

A USPS mail worker wearing a mask poses in his truck while it rains as the state of New Jersey continues Stage 2 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on August 13, 2020 in Ventnor City, New Jersey.

Alexi Rosenfeld | Getty Images

The U.S. Postal Service had drafted a press release announcing plans to send 650 million masks out across the U.S. early in the coronavirus crisis, but the White House ultimately abandoned the plan, The Washington Post reported Thursday.

The plan would have sent a pack of five reusable masks to every residential address in the country, the Post reported, citing one of thousands of internal post office documents obtained by watchdog group American Oversight.

“Our organization is uniquely suited to undertake this historic mission of delivering face coverings to every American household in the fight against the COVID-19 virus,” then-Postmaster General and CEO Megan J. Brennan said in the scrapped news release, which was dated to be released in April.

Brennan was succeeded in the summer by Louis DeJoy, whose drastic cost-cutting measures at the government agency have sparked controversy in advance of the 2020 election.

The idea to have USPS ship out personal protective equipment came from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Post reported. The reported plan was to start distributing masks in April, with Covid-19 hot spots getting first priority.

The newly uncovered documents suggest the government had initially intended to utilize the Postal Service in early pandemic response plans. The distribution program would have come at a time when President Donald Trump largely resisted wearing a mask.

The White House ultimately canceled the program, senior administration officials told the Post.

“There was concern from some in the White House Domestic Policy Council and the office of the vice president that households receiving masks might create concern or panic,” one administration official told the newspaper. Trump had told journalist Bob Woodward in March that he sought to downplay the virus because he didn’t want to create a panic, according to recently released recordings.

HHS later launched Project: America Strong, a $675 million program to distribute face masks across the country. An HHS spokesperson told the Post around 600 million masks have been distributed out of the 650 million set aside.

The USPS declined to comment on the reports. HHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Source Article

Read more

Garden Grove Unified reverses plan to reopen schools for in-person instruction

GARDEN GROVE, Calif. (KABC) — Garden Grove Unified School District has reversed its plan for reopening schools.

According to the Orange County Register, the county’s third-largest school district announced Wednesday that it’s no longer planning to return to in-class learning in October.

The district says more parents than expected want to continue with distance learning, and school officials needs more time for planning and to obtain additional technology for students.

RELATED: Huntington Park business gets creative, builds space-saving desks for students doing distance learning in tight quarters

The district, which includes about 41,000 students, initially planned to reopen elementary schools on Oct. 5 and middle and high schools on Oct. 12. Most campuses planned a hybrid with some in-person learning and some online instruction due to physical distancing requirements.

It is unclear when the district will reopen campuses.

In the meantime, the district says it’s working to expand its on-site supervision programs to help parents.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Source Article

Read more

Interior design tricks that brought calm to a chaotic open floor plan

Marta and Scott Dragos built their Winchester home with an open floor plan. Not just because that’s how today’s families live, but because Scott, a former NFL player, is a pretty big guy. “We eliminated walls so my husband wouldn’t feel like he was living in a dollhouse,” Marta says.

However, with three young children and a puppy, the first floor felt chaotic. Everyone congregated in the great room, and the television was often left on during meals at the adjacent dining table. Meanwhile the formal living room sat empty, and never mind the mess in the playroom, which was the first thing people saw when they walked in. “The synergies of the rooms were off and not suited to our life,” Marta says.

Enter Liza Kugeler and Laura Ogden of Realm Interiors, who reconfigured and redecorated. Not only did they bring order to the home, they incorporated Marta’s stylish aesthetic in a way that works for an active family. All without undertaking renovations. “Open floor plans can be overwhelming with their multipurpose natures,” Ogden says. “Our goal was to define each space while also connecting them using low-impact modifications.”

The designers started by reassessing what the family needed from each room. They completely reassigned some spaces, while simply tweaking the furniture layout in others. For example, moving the dining table out of the bay window into the center of the great room did wonders. It now anchors the open floor plan and divides the kitchen from the living area. Plus, there’s a clear circulation path around the Scandinavian-style table commissioned from furniture maker Saltwoods, and a new vignette in the bay window. The results are far-reaching, as it’s also a worthy focal point from the entry. “We love the dance between the light wood and pops of black,” Kugeler says.

Reworking the tiny, indistinct kitchen island solved multiple issues, too. Kugeler and Ogden replaced the white marble top with a slab of leathered black granite in a much larger size, adding legs for support, and painting the base in Farrow & Ball Pigeon. The island now makes a statement and serves as a more comfortable place to eat. They also updated the cabinetry with matte black knobs and pulls, put in fashion-forward lighting, and detailed the hood with oak trim.

The most significant change was swapping the living and family rooms. The living space on the other side of the dining table from the kitchen had become the default spot for pretty much everything. Out went the TV along with facing sofas, which made the room much too conducive to comings and goings and also blocked the sliders to the yard. The designers lined the walls with a neutral grass-cloth covering for texture and warmth (the treatment continues into the entry, tying the spaces together), and reoriented the furniture to invite conversation. “The kids can run through and use it — the sofa and chairs are upholstered in family-friendly fabrics — but it’s cozy,” Kugeler says. “You feel embraced.”

Read more

Bipartisan House group releases $1.5 trillion coronavirus relief plan

The 50-member, bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus on Tuesday released a $1.5 trillion COVID-19 aid package that they hope will help push congressional leaders and the White House toward a similar compromise.

The measure also gives the caucus members, many of whom are considered vulnerable for reelection this cycle, an opportunity to tell voters they offered a compromise and deflect blame for potential inaction on a new aid bill before the elections.

In arriving at $1.5 trillion, the Problem Solvers plan is almost exactly halfway between the $3.4 trillion bill the House passed in May and a $300 billion proposal Senate Republicans offered on the floor last week. Their proposal, however, includes automatic triggers based on hospitalization rates and progress towards vaccine development that could increase the cost by as much as $400 billion or reduce it by up to $200 billion.

The caucus officially endorsed the proposal, which requires support from at least 75 percent of its members, equally divided between Democrats and Republicans. Problem Solvers co-chairmen Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., and Tom Reed, R-N.Y., kept party leaders apprised of the group’s work, but top Democrats at least have already made their displeasure known.

An unusual joint statement from several House Democratic committee leaders Tuesday afternoon said the bipartisan plan “falls short of what is needed to save lives and boost the economy.”

Source Article

Read more

White House press secretary mocks CNN reporter’s basic question about Trump’s healthcare plan and tells her to ‘come work here at the White House’ if she wants information



Sarah Bush holding a sign: Kayleigh McEnany takes a question from CNN's Kaitlan Collins on Wednesday. Screenshot/Fox News


© Screenshot/Fox News
Kayleigh McEnany takes a question from CNN’s Kaitlan Collins on Wednesday. Screenshot/Fox News

  • The White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, on Wednesday dismissed a CNN reporter’s questions about which administration officials were working on a long-delayed healthcare plan.
  • “I’m not going to give you a readout of what our healthcare plan looks like and who’s working on it,” McEnany told the reporter. “If you want to know, come work here at the White House.”
  • President Donald Trump claimed on Tuesday night that his healthcare plan was “all ready” to be revealed, but it’s unclear when that will happen. The US election is 48 days away.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, on Wednesday refused to say which administration officials were working on a healthcare plan that President Donald Trump has long promised to unveil and recently said was “all ready.”

Loading...

Load Error

During the White House press briefing, CNN’s Kaitlan Collins pointed out that three top healthcare officials in the Trump administration had said during testimony before a Senate committee that they were unaware of Trump’s Obamacare replacement plan.

“Today on Capitol Hill, the three top medical experts in this administration said they have no idea of any kind of plan that’s being formulated,” Collins said. “So who is it that is working on the healthcare plan that’s going to be introduced before the election?”

McEnany responded that “a wide array” of White House officials and “multiple stakeholders,” including the Domestic Policy Council, were working on the plan.

Dismissing Collins’ follow-up questions, the press secretary told the reporter she should come work at the White House if she wanted to find out who specifically was involved in the effort to replace the Affordable Care Act.

“I’m not going to give you a readout of what our healthcare plan looks like and who’s working on it,” McEnany said. “If you want to know, come work here at the White House.”

Describing the nonpublic plan as “the president’s vision for the next five years,” McEnany ticked off a vague list of its tenets.

“In aggregate, it’s going to be a very comprehensive strategy, one where we’re saving healthcare while Democrats are trying to take healthcare away, where we’re making healthcare better and cheaper, guaranteeing protections for people with preexisting conditions, stopping surprise medical billing, increasing transparency, defending the right to keep your doctor and your plan, fighting lobbyists and special interests, and making healthier — and finding cures to diseases,” she said.

The president has falsely claimed dozens of times that he has protected Americans with preexisting conditions. In reality, his administration is battling in court to overturn Obamacare, which protects those Americans; overturning the law would strip millions of people of healthcare.

The Republican Party failed to repeal and replace Obamacare — despite promising for years to do so — when it controlled both the Senate and the House in 2017 and 2018.

During a town hall on Tuesday night,

Read more

Bipartisan Plan for Stimulus Checks ‘Very Meaningful,’ White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows Says

In a sign that Congress may be able to agree on another round of relief, the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus put forth a stimulus package of their own—a move that could be encouraging to the White House.



Mark Meadows wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to members of the press outside the West Wing of the White House on August 28, in Washington, D.C. On Wednesday, Meadows said the proposal put forth by the Problem Solvers Caucus was "very meaningful."


© Alex Wong/Getty
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to members of the press outside the West Wing of the White House on August 28, in Washington, D.C. On Wednesday, Meadows said the proposal put forth by the Problem Solvers Caucus was “very meaningful.”

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows told reporters on Wednesday that it was “very thoughtful” and “very meaningful” to see Republicans and Democrats coming together to put forth a stimulus package. Unveiled on Tuesday, the package provides funding for a number of measures included in the bipartisan CARES Act, such as unemployment and another round of stimulus checks.

HEROES vs. HEALS Act: How Stimulus Packages Differ Ahead Of Second Coronavirus Relief Aid

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

While it may seem like an indication of the two sides of the political aisle coming together for relief after weeks of stalled talks, Meadows wasn’t confident it was reflective of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s position. However, if it serves as the foundation for a real desire to get a deal done, “we’re encouraged by that.”

On Tuesday, Pelosi told CNBC that the House will remain in session until legislators can agree on another round of relief that “meets the needs of the American people.” During a conference call that morning, she told House Democrats they had to stay in Washington, D.C, “until we have a bill.”

Meadows called Pelosi’s willingness to stay in session “another encouraging sign,” but added that his experience in Congress taught him “promises on air don’t necessarily provide real fruit behind closed doors.” Conversations he’s had on Capitol Hill gives him the “growing sense” that there are “real needs that need to be addressed.”

The Problem Solvers Caucus’ plan provides $100 billion for testing and health care, $240 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program, and $145 billion for schools and child care. It also allocates about $500 billion for state and local aid, including $130 billion from the CARES Act.

When asked what the sticking point was in the proposal, Meadows said the “biggest obstacle” remains the amount of money afforded for state and local governments.

“But there was a caveat there that was based on real revenue losses, and that caveat gives me hope that if we’re willing to look at real facts and real losses that hopefully we can get to something that actually makes sense,” Meadows said.

The package allows for a reduction of $130 billion to state and local aid based on COVID-19 hospitalization metrics and vaccine progress.

Along with reducers, the package allows for boosters if conditions take a turn for the worse. If unemployment remains a significant problem in February, three months of enhanced benefits will automatically kick in. Depending on the situation in March, people could

Read more