President Obama’s White House photographer breaks down his photojournalism career (video)

Pete Souza, American photojournalist and former Chief Official White House Photographer for U.S. Presidents Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan, takes us through his illustrious career. From capturing Reagan’s reaction to Space Shuttle Challenger’s explosion to photographing President Obama’s Cabinet in the situation room during the raid on Bin Laden, Pete breaks down some of his most iconic images. ‘The Way I See It’ is in theaters now and will be broadcasted on MSNBC beginning this Friday, October 16th. See the complete video here.

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How to watch documentary on White House photographer Pete Souza, ‘The Way I See It’

The Way I See It is a documentary about former Chief Official White House Photographer Pete Souza that makes its TV debut on MSNBC tonight, Friday, October 9, at 10 p.m. ET following The Rachel Maddow Show. You can also watch it on FuboTV, Sling or Hulu + Live (free trial).

Pete Souza was the Chief Official White House Photographer to both President Obama and President Reagan. One of Souza’s most iconic photos is of Obama bending over for a 5-year-old boy who asked him, “Is my haircut just like yours?” Obama let the young boy feel his hair, and Souza got a shot of this precious moment.

In the role of White House photographer, Souza had unprecedented access behind-the-scenes to both presidents’ administrations, documented in his books “Obama: An Intimate Portrait,” and “Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents,” in which he compares Obama to President Donald Trump. In The Way I See It, you’ll get access to see the Obama and Reagan administrations through the eyes of Souza.

What channel is MSNBC on?

You can find which channel MSNBC is on by using the channel finders here: Verizon Fios, AT&T U-verse, Comcast Xfinity, Spectrum/Charter, Optimum/Altice, DIRECTV and Dish.

Where can I watch The Way I See It if I don’t have cable?

You can live stream it on FuboTV (7-day free trial, then $59.99/month). FuboTV is a streaming service that offers access to your favorite TV shows, live sports events and much more. You can also watch it on Sling with their Blue package, or on Hulu + Live (free trial).

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This photographer found a fortune in an abandoned house



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Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article


According to Dave, the home’s story starts at the turn of the 20th century, when a Polish family moved to Ontario and set up home in the property. They reportedly made their living selling fruit from the orchard at a roadside stand, which was well known amongst locals. However, they abruptly upped sticks and left in 1985, leaving the home frozen in time.



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From the piles of belongings and family photos scattered around the property, it’s clear that the family left in a rush, leaving behind precious mementos like this one. But why did the previous residents leave in such a hurry?



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As told to Freaktography’s Dave by relatives of the family, the story goes that the couple had three children, but their eldest son is said to have developed a drinking problem as he grew older. One day in 1979, he purportedly hit a pregnant woman and her two-year-old child while driving drunk, sadly killing them both. As punishment, he was put behind bars for three years, which devastated the family.



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Look back at Obama and Reagan through the eyes of their White House photographer

The new documentary The Way I See It looks at former presidents Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan through the eyes of Pete Souza. During his time as an official White House photographer, Souza captured the profound, intimate, funny and dignified moments of two of the most iconic presidents in modern history. The Way I See It is directed by Dawn Porter, who also made the wonderful and inspiring documentary John Lewis: Good Trouble.



a man standing in front of a crowd: Dawn Porter's new documentary, The Way I See It, looks at the presidencies of Barack Obama and Ronald Regan through the eyes of official White House photographer Pete Souza (seen holding a camera). Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images


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Dawn Porter’s new documentary, The Way I See It, looks at the presidencies of Barack Obama and Ronald Regan through the eyes of official White House photographer Pete Souza (seen holding a camera). Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images



Pete Souza wearing a suit and tie: Dawn Porter's new documentary The Way I See It sees the presidencies of Barack Obama and Ronald Regan through the eyes of official White House photographer Pete Souza (seen holding a camera).


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Dawn Porter’s new documentary The Way I See It sees the presidencies of Barack Obama and Ronald Regan through the eyes of official White House photographer Pete Souza (seen holding a camera).


Both Porter and Souza were my guests on CNET’s I’m So Obsessed podcast. During our conversation, Porter explained why she was compelled by Souza and his perspective working for Regan and Obama. When Souza started photographing Obama, the future president was still a senator.

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“He [Souza] was thinking, ‘Who is this man?'” said Porter. “And that’s what I was thinking about with Pete. How did he come to be? What has influenced Pete?”

Since hanging up his White House camera, Souza, as his Instagram profile states, has become a citizen of Earth. Over the last three years, the former photojournalist gained attention for having his own opinions about the current occupant of the White House. He registered his distaste as only a photographer can, by posting photos as a juxtaposition. The idea wasn’t to be political but to remind the world of the dignity and empathy needed to be the president.

“I had a unique voice having worked for not only a Republican and a Democratic president, but what’s arguably the most iconic Republican president and the most iconic Democratic president of certainly my generation. I could come at this with a nonpartisan view that this wasn’t because Donald Trump’s a Republican. It had nothing to do with it. He was not fit for office,” said Souza. “For three years, we saw what it means to have someone who’s ill-prepared and is not empathetic. What it means when you’re faced with a global pandemic and trying to bluff your way through it. Tying to do everything that makes you look good, and not what’s best for the country. So it wasn’t really that difficult decision for me to make to start speaking out.”

Over a lively 30 minutes, Porter and Souza discuss why empathy is important for a leader to have, the passing of John Lewis, the significance of professional athletes protesting the shooting of Jacob Blake and what it’s like having Obama officiate your wedding.

Listen to my entire conversation with Porter and Souza on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. The Way I See It opens Friday in

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What Would a Biden Presidency Look Like? Obama’s White House Photographer Picks Six Photos That Offer Clues

For years, Pete Souza, the former chief official White House photographer of President Barack Obama, stayed behind the camera. But in The Way I See It, a new documentary from filmmaker Dawn Porter, the lens is trained squarely on him. The film, in select theaters on Sept. 18 and premiering on MSNBC on Oct. 9, focuses on his work during the Obama administration as well as the years he spent photographing President Ronald Reagan. “What I was trying to do was look for these authentic moments,” Souza tells TIME about his tenure in both administrations. “The fleeting moments that not only reflect what’s happening in front of you, but that reveal what the president is like as a human being.”

What Would a Biden Presidency Look Like? Obama’s White House Photographer Picks Six Photos That Offer Clues

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In recent years, Souza has become more outspoken, particularly about his own feelings on President Trump, on his Instagram account, where he has more than 2 million followers. There, he shares photographs from his time in the White House, many of which are accompanied by snarky captions that compare the current president to the previous one. The popularity of his account led to the 2018 publication of his most recent book Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents. He goes even further in The Way I See It, revealing more of his personal life onscreen. “This puts me in a more public footing, which is a little uncomfortable for me,” Souza tells TIME. “But at the same time, I couldn’t not agree to do this film. I feel so strongly about the institution of the presidency and how it’s being ripped to shreds by this guy.”

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Souza hopes that viewers of the film can draw connections between both Reagan and Obama through their appearance in photographs. “Whether you agree with their politics or policies, they’re decent human beings and they’re empathetic,” Souza says. “They know the presidency is about us and not about them.” Throughout the documentary, he discusses what it was like to have such unfettered access to Barack Obama and how he was able to showcase the former president’s humanity through pictures. In seeing authentic moments of a person exercising their capacity for empathy, we can understand what type of leader they are, Souza says.

Given the time he spent in the Obama White House, Souza also had a high level of access to the current Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, when he served as Vice President alongside Obama. TIME asked Souza to choose photographs he took of Biden during that time to discuss what he thinks voters can glean about Biden as a leader, and what a Biden presidency might look like.

Reaching out across the aisle



Barack Obama, Mike Lee, Sheldon Whitehouse sitting at a table: President Barack Obama talks with Rep. Rual Labrador as Vice President Joe Biden talks with Sen. Mike Lee following a meeting with bipartisan Members of Congress to discuss criminal justice reform, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, on Feb. 24, 2015. Official White House Photo by Pete Souza


© Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
President Barack Obama talks with Rep. Rual Labrador as Vice President Joe Biden talks with Sen. Mike Lee following a meeting with bipartisan Members of Congress

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‘The Way I See It’ shows how Obama White House photographer Pete Souza saw it

Pete Souza has had two stints as White House photographer: 5½ years working for Ronald Reagan, then eight for Barack Obama. Talk about camera-ready bipartisanship. It’s working for Obama that’s the main concern of “The Way I See It.” The documentary opens Friday at the Kendall Square and several suburban theaters. It will also be broadcast Oct. 9 on MSNBC, which produced the film.

Souza, 65, was born in New Bedford and discovered photography as an undergraduate at Boston University. He went to Kansas for a master’s degree, worked for a couple of small papers there, then was hired by the Chicago Sun-Times. This led to that first White House job. Souza makes plain that while he didn’t share Reagan’s politics he liked and respected him. Which makes all the more striking his disgust with Donald Trump (we’ll get to that, the documentary certainly does).

President Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan waved to the crowd in Dixon, Ill., in February 1984.
President Ronald Reagan and Nancy Reagan waved to the crowd in Dixon, Ill., in February 1984. Pete Souza/Focus Features

At Nancy Reagan’s request, Souza was asked to be official photographer at her husband’s funeral. That’s hard to top as a vote of confidence. He was working for the Chicago Tribune at the time. When Obama was elected to the Senate, Souza was assigned to document his first year in office. The two men hit it off. “I wasn’t with him every day,” Souza recalls, “but I got to know him pretty well professionally.” Four years later, the offer came to work for Obama. “We’re going to have some fun,” the president-elect told him.

Fun may not have been quite the right word. “Imagine trying to take a sip of water from a fire hose that never shuts off,” Souza says of the job. “If you really want to document the presidency for history, you have to be there all time.” It’s hard to imagine a more demanding job — there’s no Camp David for the White House photographer — but it’s also hard to imagine a more exhilarating one. That exhilaration very much comes through in the documentary. Looking at the various photographs and film clips, we are there. Imagine what it was like for Souza, being there all the time.

On May 1, 2011, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, along with members of their national security team, received an update in the White House Situation Room on the mission against Osama bin Laden
On May 1, 2011, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, along with members of their national security team, received an update in the White House Situation Room on the mission against Osama bin Laden Pete Souza/Associated Press

“The most interesting part of my job was seeing him in all these different compartments of his life,” Souza says of Obama. We see those compartments: chief executive, politician, husband, father, national consoler, even basketball player and coach. Also matchmaker. There are many good anecdotes in “The Way I See It,” but the best may be how Obama “badgered” Souza — that’s how the photographer puts it — into marrying his longtime girlfriend. The wedding was held in the Rose Garden, with Obama officiating. No, Souza didn’t take the wedding photos.

Souza has

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Former White House Photographer Looks Back at His Years Covering Joe Biden

David Lienemann From left: President Barack Obama, Dr. Jill Biden and Vice President Joe Biden

David Lienemann, who photographed Joe Biden’s eight years in the White House with President Barack Obama, wants people to learn more about the man now seeking that high office — and has some of his stories to tell about his time with the former vice president.

In his just-released photography book, Biden: The Obama Years and the Battle for the Soul of America, Lienemann shares memories and photos of Biden as a man with empathy informed by loss — and who, yes, really loves ice cream as much as the memes suggest.

It’s a first-hand contrast to a bitter campaign season in which Biden is challenging President Donald Trump, who has assailed Biden as enfeebled and extreme.

Lienemann has a different view of his old boss.

“In meetings, he would say, ‘How is this going to affect people in my old neighborhood in Scranton? How is this policy going to affect them? How are we making their lives better?’ ” the photographer says. “I think he’s much more concerned about those people than the machinations in D.C.”

After spending almost a decade capturing the most intimate and most public moments, Biden’s former official White House photographer also saw how he was changed by the 1972 death of wife Neilia Hunter Biden and their baby daughter, Naomi, and the 2015 death of oldest son Beau.

(Biden raised sons Beau and Hunter with his second wife, former Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden, with whom he also shares daughter Ashley.)

“He did something that I don’t think I would be able to do, and I haven’t really ever seen anyone else do,” Lienemann tells PEOPLE.

“Instead of wallowing in the tragedy,” Lienemann says, “[Biden] really pushing himself to do more. President [Obama] announced the Cancer Moonshot initiative to drive cancer research and make huge leaps forward in treatment and research. And the vice president and Dr. Biden led that initiative while they were still grieving over their son.”

David Lienemann Joe Biden (second from right) celebrating re-election with President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, in Chicago on Nov. 6, 2012.

David Lienemann Joe Biden (right) made an unannounced trip to Afghanistan in 2011 to meet with Afghan leaders and U.S. service members. The agenda included a side trip to Forward Operating Base Airborne in Wardak Province, just southwest of Kabul, to present the Bronze Star to Staff Sgt. Chad Workman.

During his time in the White House, Lienemann perfected the art of not being seen and captured nearly a million photographs. One of his favorites is a photo he took of the Bidens with Beau, then attorney general of Delaware, at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.

Just before they were supposed to walk on stage, Beau leaned over to fix his dad’s tie.

“It was just such a personal moment and such a loving moment,” says Lienemann. “It’s something that

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