This Interior Designer Turned Her Cookie-Cutter Town House Into a Personal Art Gallery

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.
“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.

Tiffany couldn’t touch the exterior or overhaul its interior, thanks to a homeowners’ association and a limited budget, but she could reimagine its white walls. She pictured a theme of timeless and cozy beauty, punctuated by details that were functional yet exciting upon a closer glance. Tiffany considered her canvas for a year, figuring that it was best to take her time on “making this home feel like me.” And when she was ready, she landed primarily on a black-and-white palette. “It’s amazing how these two colors bring a sense of balance to a space,” Tiffany says. “There’s also so much greenery outside that the black-and-white palette grounded my home and makes the backdrop of the outdoors feel and look even more intense.”

“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was painted in Tricorn Black by Sherwin-Williams. The coffee table and floor lamp are from CB2, and the chrome Wassily side chairs were found on Chairish. The framed artwork was created by Julian and the masks are vintage.
“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was
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This Tiffany Thompson Turned Her Cookie-Cutter Town House Into a Personal Art Gallery

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.

Tiffany couldn’t touch the exterior or overhaul its interior, thanks to a homeowners’ association and a limited budget, but she could reimagine its white walls. She pictured a theme of timeless and cozy beauty, punctuated by details that were functional yet exciting upon a closer glance. Tiffany considered her canvas for a year, figuring that it was best to take her time on “making this home feel like me.” And when she was ready, she landed primarily on a black-and-white palette. “It’s amazing how these two colors bring a sense of balance to a space,” Tiffany says. “There’s also so much greenery outside that the black-and-white palette grounded my home and makes the backdrop of the outdoors feel and look even more intense.”

“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was

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More time at home means more opportunity for you to design your personal kitchen, bath :: WRAL.com

Every year we consider the colors and styles homeowners are gravitating towards when personalizing their new home kitchen and baths. The 2020 season, more so than ever, has given us the most poignant glimpse into how everyday living can affect our design choices. 

The global pandemic we continue to experience has resulted in families spending more time at home, altering both their needs and wants with regards to aesthetics, technology, innovative design options and energy-saving features.  

Buyers may have also found a little extra time to spend on Pinterest or watching HGTV to get inspired on the design of their new home.

“I have buyers that come in after months of being stuck at home with social distancing/COVID restrictions and they have learned what they don’t like,” said Rachel Anne Phelps, design consultant for Drees Homes.  “Through staying home, COVID has helped buyers learn how they truly function at home and that carries over to their choices they make with me.”

So, in the spirit of how form and function merge to create a space that your family desires to spend a lot of time in, let’s take a look at what homeowners are currently asking for in their kitchen and bath design!

Lighting

As evenings may include more home-based activities like menu planning, reading, board games or puzzles, proper lighting is of the utmost importance. Undercabinet lighting and stacked cabinetry lighting remain popular in the kitchen as well as the classic look of clear glass options in the bathroom.

Other lighting must-haves include exposed bulbs, sconces everywhere, and drop-down pendants, especially in the ever-popular black and chrome.

“We are also seeing larger pendants and linear lights over the islands in the kitchen,” said Phelps. “A lot of homebuyers see lighting as the jewelry of the home and in main living spaces they want something that makes a statement.”

Fixtures

Many homeowners are opting for their accent pieces to help them achieve a more modern look so they pair up brushed nickel and matte black features with their cabinetry of choice resulting in a wonderful contrast. Supporting that more modern look is the decision to forego dual-handle bathroom faucets, choosing rather the single-handle option.

Appliances

We all seem to be cooking more these days, dusting off recipes and discovering what our kitchens are really capable of doing for us!

As buyers work with their builders to layout their dream kitchen, designers are receiving requests for hidden microwaves, vent hoods with a cooktop, oversized ranges, and of course the tried and true double wall oven or microwave/oven combination. 

While stainless steel still ranks supreme (especially fingerprint-resistant stainless steel), black stainless continues to gain popularity in that modern and edgy department. However, an even fresher look of matte white with gold or rose gold handles and accents is being considered by homeowners who desire an open and airy feel in their kitchen.

Tile

Whether it is the view from soaking in

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At Home: Dorm decor pairs space savers, personal style – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

Washburn University freshman and art education major Ella Prengel may have moved away from home and into the dorms this fall, but she took pieces of home with her and incorporated them into her dorm décor.

“When I was deciding how I was going to decorate my dorm room, I definitely thought about how my room was at home, so I have a lot of my art stuff, pictures of my friends and stuff that reminds me of home,” she said.

Prengel lives in a suite, which consists of two sleeping spaces that house two students each, with an adjoining shared bathroom, a configuration that many universities are adopting as they remodel dormitories built in the 1950s and 1960s to meet the needs of modern students.

After being quarantined for the first two weeks of the school year, Prengel said she and her suitemates were eager to get settled into their new space and decorate.

“Decorating was about reflecting my personality — bright colors, butterflies on the ceiling,” she said. “I want my side of my room to be something I can go back to and feel comfortable in.”

Prengel isn’t alone in her desire to create a space that feels like home away from home. Dorm design, furniture and accessories are big business for retailers each August, and new trends emerge every year for the hottest items in dorm living. 2020 is no exception.

Textures in pillows, rugs and bedding are very popular this year. Shag and fur pillows adorn extra-long twin beds, and velvet has made a comeback in the college scene in the form of comforters and curtains.

On the color front, ombre gradients and retro mini-appliances like microwaves and refrigerators in bright colors saw a surge in sales, along with the industrial look popping up in student desks, chairs and lamps made with industrial pipe and pipe fittings.

Succulents, both real and faux, are making appearances in textile designs and artwork but also provide an easy-care option for students who want to bring a little nature indoors.

By far, the biggest dorm design trend of 2020 has been the boho chic movement, which incorporates natural elements, colors, patterns and textures. Macramé is back in a big way, and not just to hold plants. The distinctive texture is being used in comforters and pillows. Wicker, fur, feathers and live edge furniture like desks and end tables are showing up on campuses across the country.

Because of the space limitations and other challenges that dorm design brings, it can be easy to become overwhelmed with the choices available, but the truth is, functionality and versatility should be at the center of design decisions.

Start with an inspiration piece. A bedspread or comforter, artwork, rug or color palette provides a starting point for design inspiration. Use your inspiration piece to build your room, pulling in colors or designs to coordinate.

One large, oversized rug has a bigger impact than smaller throw rugs, tying the design concept together and providing

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Atlanta activist spent $200G in Black Lives Matter donations on house, personal expenses: FBI

The FBI has arrested the founder of a Black Lives Matter group in Atlanta on fraud and money laundering charges.

Atlanta activist spent $200G in Black Lives Matter donations on house, personal expenses: FBI

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Sir Maejor Page, 32, was accused Friday of misappropriating $200,000 in donations he solicited through Facebook on behalf of Black Lives Matter of Greater Atlanta, Fox 5 Atlanta reported Friday.

Page was released on bond after appearing before a judge via video. He did not immediately return messages Saturday from Fox News.

LOUISVILLE OFFICER WHO CRITICIZED BLACK LIVES MATTER AND ANTIFA IN EMAIL RELIEVED OF COMMAND, TO RETIRE

The FBI opened an investigation last year after a cooperating witness submitted a fraud complaint against Page, whose real name is Tyree Conyers-Page, FBI agent Matthew Desorbo said in the complaint.

Page founded Black Lives Matter of Greater Atlanta in 2016 and this year took in more than $466,000 in donations in June, July and August, Desorbo said.

“In sum, Page has spent over $200,000 on personal items generated from

donations received through BLMGA Facebook page with no identifiable purchase or expenditure

for social or racial justice,” he said.

The FBI said Page pledged to use those donations “for George Floyd” but instead used the money make purchases related to food, dining, entertainment, clothing, furniture, a home security system, tailored suits and accessories.

According to the bureau, Page also used $112,000 of the donated money to purchase a house for himself in Toledo, Ohio. The transaction took place last month.

Black Lives Matter

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Should You Get a Personal Loan for Home Improvement or Renovation?

Ever since you stepped across the threshold at the first open house, you’ve been in love with your cozy, turn-of-the-20th-century Craftsman. Your spouse loves its sheltered porch; you can’t get enough of the ageless walnut woodwork. You don’t regret buying an older house, but you have no illusions that the place is perfect. Lately, you’ve begun to realize your growing family needs a bigger, more modern space.

Your search for a larger, new construction home in your area, but the market is way too hot, and post-World War II housing stock just doesn’t have the same charm. So you settle on a compromise: finishing your current home’s cinder-block basement. At about $15,000, it won’t be cheap, but it’ll definitely be more affordable than a bigger house.

There’s just one problem. You’d have no problem dipping into your personal savings to cover the down payment on another house since you’d recoup the funds once you sold your current house. You’re aware that a finished basement will probably boost your home’s resale value in the long run, but you won’t see that boost anytime soon. After all, the whole point of this project is to keep your family in the home for years to come. And because you used a low-down-payment FHA loan to purchase the property, you lack the requisite equity to draw on a home equity line of credit (HELOC).

Are you out of options? Not necessarily. If you have decent credit, you may qualify for an unsecured personal loan with few strings beyond the obligation to make monthly installment payments. For homeowners without sufficient equity, a major home improvement project is a legitimate reason to get a personal loan – one that may be more fiscally responsible than using a personal loan to pay for a vacation or wedding, for instance.

How Home Improvement Loans Work

A home improvement loan, through a company like Credible.com, is a personal, usually unsecured loan that’s intended to finance expenses related to home improvement projects. In practice, a home improvement loan is identical to personal loans taken out for other permissible purposes, such as debt consolidation, medical expenses, or business startup expenses.

Personal loan rates and terms generally don’t vary by loan purpose. Instead, they depend on the borrower’s creditworthiness, non-credit factors such as the borrower’s debt-to-income ratio, the lender’s underwriting standards, and prevailing benchmark interest rates.

Borrowers with excellent credit (FICO scores above 720 to 740) can expect personal loan offers with:

  • Low origination fees, if any (likely below 2%)
  • Low annual percentage rates (below 10% to 12% APR, including any origination fee)
  • Longer terms (five to seven years)
  • High borrowing limits (up to and including the lender maximum, often $35,000 to $40,000)

Borrowers with good credit (FICO scores above 660 to 680) can expect to qualify for personal loans with:

  • Moderate origination fees, if any (likely below 4%)
  • Moderate rates (below 15% APR, including any origination fee)
  • Moderate terms (three to five years)
  • Moderate borrowing limits (variable by lender)

If they

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Home Improvement Loan or Personal Loan

Personal Loan or Home Improvement Loan? That is the question.

We love decorating our houses.

And there are phases in our lives when maybe we've spent too much time watching Food Food or TLC and thus have built castles in the air of visions of turning our kitchen into a chef's paradise. Or perhaps our master bath is just one shower away from a disaster. For we really do love Italian tiles on our bathrooms.

And if so, then cheers, you're not alone. Recently, the Joint Center of Housing Studies for Harvard University has investigated and reported that the home improvement industry should continue post record-level spending in 2016. For many people, this means borrowing money to pay for the well planned home improvements and home decorating schemes .

Now, one is ought to face a tough and difficult and perhaps hypothetical question.

So, which home improvement loan is right for you?

Many homeowners and homemakers look to tap the equity in their homes. But home equity loans or home equity lines of credit may not be possible or very practical for some borrowers. In that case, one should consider using a personal loan.

While it is known that one can use a personal loan for a variety of reasons, there are a few reasons why a personal loan can have advantages over home equity loans when it comes to a renovation loan, to be specific.

The application process for a personal loan is usually quite simple and quite straightforward. Your own financial situation-for example, your credit history and earning power; This is often the main deciding factor for whether or not you will be able to get a loan, for how much, and if so, at what interest rate. Some personal loans even boast of having no origination fees.

However, home equity loans or home improvement loans on the other hand, are akin to applying for a mortgage (in fact, home equity loans are sometimes called second mortgages). How much you can borrow depends on several factors, including the value of your home. Because you can only borrow against the equity you already have (ie the difference between your home's value and your mortgage), you may have to arrange – and pay for – a home appraisal.

Let's now see this case in the case of a home improvement loan. With a home equity loan or a home improvement loan, you can only borrow against the equity you have – which, as a new homeowner, is probably not much. You maybe have not had enough time to chip away at your mortgage and the market has not yet elevated your home's price. A personal loan lets you start home improvements regardless of how much equity you have. So, that is one benefit of availing a Home Improvement Loan.

With a home equity loan, you use your home as collateral, which means an inability to repay could result in your home going into foreclosure. While failing to pay your personal …

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