Snowfall alerts issued for mountain passes in B.C.’s Southern Interior



a train covered in snow: Weather conditions at the Pennask Summit on the Okanagan Connector on Tuesday morning.


© DriveBC
Weather conditions at the Pennask Summit on the Okanagan Connector on Tuesday morning.

Snowfall warnings have been issued for several mountain passes in B.C.’s Southern Interior.

Sent out by Environment Canada on Tuesday morning at 10:42 a.m., the warnings say drivers should be on the lookout for adverse weather conditions and take safety precautions.

The national weather agency says a strong frontal system is moving across the province, and that freezing levels have fallen in advance of the system.

Read more: Snow and wind warnings in place for much of B.C. Tuesday

It added that 10 to 15 centimetres of snow is expected Tuesday, with an additional 10 to 15 centimetres possible in the evening and overnight.

The national weather agency also issued special weather statements, including for:

Highway 3 (Paulson Summit to Kootenay Pass)

Highway 97C (Okanagan Connector, Pennask Summit)

Highway 1 (Eagle Pass to Rogers Pass)

Yoho Park / Kootenay Park.

For the Coquihalla, Environment Canada says snow has changed to rain but is expected to switch back to flurries near the summit overnight.

For the Pennask Summit and Kootenay Pass, snow is predicted to taper off Tuesday afternoon, with 15 centimetres expected.

Read more: Cool B.C. temperatures spark annual crush of swapping to winter tires

Elevations:

Town of Hope: 41 metres (134 feet)

City of Kelowna: 344 metres (1,128 feet)

City of Revelstoke: 480 metres (1,574 feet)

Town of Merritt: 605 metres (1,984 feet)

Eagle Pass, Highway 1: 550 metres (1,804 feet)

Coquihalla Highway Summit: 1,210 metres (3,969 feet)

Rogers Pass, Highway 1: 1,330 metres (4,363 feet)

Paulson Summit, Highway 3: 1,446 metres (4,744 feet)

Pennask Summit, Okanagan Connector: 1,717 metres (5,633 feet)

Kootenay Pass, Highway 3: 1,781 metres (5,843 feet)

For the latest road conditions, visit DriveBC.

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Bill to expand support for community addiction treatment passes House

A bill that would establish a $25 million fund to support organizations specializing in addiction treatment and support for family members of those suffering from addiction is heading to the Senate after passing the House last week.

The Family Support Services for Addiction Act, introduced by a bipartisan group of lawmakers including Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMeeting Trump Supreme Court pick a bridge too far for some Democrats Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for SCOTUS confirmation hearings before election Sunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election MORE (D-N.Y.) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoHillicon Valley: Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives | Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 | Democrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference GOP senators call on Trump to oppose nationalizing 5G Congress must finish work on popular conservation bill before time runs out MORE (R-WV) in the Senate as well as Reps. David TroneDavid John TroneUS Chamber of Commerce set to endorse 23 House freshman Democrats Preventing the opioid epidemic from getting worse requires attacking it at the source Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers MORE (D-Md.) and Dan MeuserDaniel (Dan) MeuserMORE (R-Pa.) in the House, passed the lower chamber via voice vote on Thursday.

Under the bill, local and national groups under a wide umbrella of addiction-related services would be allowed to apply for grants under a fund established to provide $25 million in grants over half a decade. Applicable groups include addiction support groups for both those with addictions and their families, education and training organizations, as well as “systems navigation” services which help families find addiction treatment centers.

“Addressing the addiction crisis in our state requires supporting families who are impacted by the crisis every day. Families are often quickly thrown into a world of addiction and substance use disorder that they know little about, without the resources they need to support their loved ones,” Gillibrand said in a news release in February.

“This key step will support people living with substance use disorder and will encourage their recovery,” she added.

Rates of addiction and substance misuse have risen across the U.S. amid the coronavirus outbreak, which has forced millions out of work and deepened economic woes for many Americans. A survey earlier this year by the Addiction Policy Forum found that 20 percent of Americans reported themselves or a family member increasing their use of recreational drugs or alcohol since the pandemic began.

A separate study last year before COVID-19 reached the U.S. found that nearly half of U.S. adults knew a family member with substance abuse issues.

The lawmakers’ bill is supported by a number of national and local groups focused on battling stigmas around addiction treatment, including the Center on Addiction and Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which operates Drugfree.org.

One supporter of the bill pointed to the expansion of family support services as a key step in battling the

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Coronavirus live updates: House passes $2.2 trillion COVID-19 stimulus bill

The House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus relief bill late Thursday night, with a close 214-207 vote.

In some last-minute drama, 18 Democrats voted no on the bill. Many who were against the bill are moderates who are very unhappy with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and leadership for staging what they call a “show” vote on a bill that will never become law.

The Republican-led Senate is not expected to take up the measure.

The House bill is largely symbolic and puts on the record what Democrats have been calling for for months; economic relief for those impacted by the pandemic.

The bill would restore the $600 federal unemployment benefits that expired in July and would include another round of direct checks to Americans at $1,200 per taxpayer and $500 per dependent.

It would also extend the Paycheck Protection Program to help small businesses, a benefit that expired in early August.

A bipartisan COVID-19 relief bill is still possible. Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are still having discussions. Pelosi announced late Thursday that she and Mnuchin have exchanged paper and are still deep in negotiations.

“We made a lot of progress over the last few days, we still don’t have an agreement, but we have more work to do. And we’re going to see where we end up,” Mnuchin told reporters Wednesday.

ABC News’ Mariam Khan contributed to this report.

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U.S. House passes Democratic COVID-19 aid plan after bipartisan deal proves elusive

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday approved a $2.2 trillion Democratic plan to provide more economic relief from the coronavirus pandemic, as a bipartisan deal continued to elude House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the White House.

Objections from top Republicans are likely to doom the House Democrats’ plan in the Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has called the $2.2 trillion price tag “outlandish,” although Democrats have reduced the cost of their proposal by over a trillion dollars since May. The House vote was 214-207.

No Republican voted for the Democratic plan, although 18 Democrats voted no, many of them moderates from swing districts who have been urging Pelosi to bring a bipartisan proposal to the House floor.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Representative Abigail Spanberger, one of the Democrats who voted no, said.

Republican President Donald Trump’s negotiating team has suggested a $1.6 trillion response, and the White House on Thursday dismissed Democrats’ $2.2 trillion plan as not serious.

Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have talked every day this week, including a 50-minute phone call Thursday, in an effort to negotiate a bipartisan aid package to respond to the economic fallout from a pandemic that has killed more than 207,000 Americans and thrown millions out of work.

Congress and the White House approved more than $3 trillion worth of coronavirus relief measures earlier this year, but Mnuchin, as well as members of Congress from both parties, have argued more stimulus is needed.

Asked if there would be a resolution to her negotiations with the administration on Thursday evening, Pelosi told reporters, “No.” She gave no details of their talks but said: “Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language.”

In the absence of a deal with the White House, and with lawmakers preparing to leave Washington for the remaining weeks of the 2020 presidential and congressional campaign, the Democratic-majority House went ahead and passed the Democrats’ proposal.

“Frankly if we had reached a bipartisan agreement…we wouldn’t have this bill on the floor,” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said. “But we also want to let the American people know where we stand.”

Pelosi and Mnuchin differed over aid to state and local governments, Democratic demands for a child tax credit and stronger worker safety protections, healthcare provisions and help for small businesses.

After Pelosi and Mnuchin’s phone call Thursday afternoon, Pelosi’s deputy chief of staff Drew Hammill wrote on Twitter: “The two discussed further clarifications on amounts and language, but distance on key areas remain.”

White House spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany dismissed the Democratic proposal as “not a serious offer.”

Pelosi said of the White House proposal on Bloomberg TV: “This isn’t half a loaf. What they’re offering is the heel of the loaf.”

Republican Senator Mike Braun told CNBC on Thursday that a deal worth over $1.6 trillion could be rejected by one-third

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House passes Democratic pandemic relief measure

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion Covid-19 relief bill Thursday night as negotiations between the administration and Democrats have failed to yield a bipartisan deal and the time to pass new relief measures ahead of November’s election ticks away.

The measure passed 214-207. No Republicans supported it and 18 Democrats voted against it. Nearly all of the Democrats who voted against the bill are locked in close re-election races.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., said in a statement about why she voted against it. “My focus remains on working with Democrats and Republicans to get relief to my district immediately, and partisan gamesmanship will not do it.”

The legislation, known as Heroes 2.0, is a scaled down version from the Heroes Act, which the House passed in May.

The vote occurred as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin continue to discuss a bipartisan agreement.

Late Thursday, Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol that she spoke to Mnuchin multiple times Thursday but that there was no deal yet.

Asked if one was possible, she said, “I don’t know. It just depends.”

She said that the details matter just as much as how many dollars are being spent, which is an indication that they could be further along in negotiations than they are letting on.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” she said.

According to two sources briefed on the negotiations earlier Thursday, Mnuchin has offered Pelosi a total spending level of $1.62 trillion, up from the $1.5 trillion he had previously suggested.

Inching closer to Pelosi’s demands, Mnuchin agreed to $250 billion more spending for state and local efforts — something President Donald Trump has previously objected to — as well as $150 billion more for the nation’s schools, $75 billion more for testing and tracing efforts, $60 billion for rent and mortgage assistance and $15 billion in food assistance. The details of the offer were first reported by Roll Call.

But on many issues, that offer was still short of what Democrats are demanding.

Mnuchin has also not agreed to re-upping the $600 per week in federal unemployment insurance, offering a level of $400 per week instead, creating a major sticking point for any deal.

“That’s why we not only have a dollars debate,” Pelosi said earlier Thursday, “we have a values debate. Still, I’m optimistic.”

Mnuchin’s proposals are largely similar to those made by the Problem Solvers caucus, a bipartisan congressional group. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., praised the move, saying, “to the extent Secretary Mnuchin has indicated that he will use the Problem Solvers proposal as a basis for any counteroffer actually brings us much closer to an agreement than we’ve ever been.

Even if a deal is reached between Pelosi and Mnuchin, it’s unclear what Senate Republicans would do with a bill or how it would

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House passes Democratic pandemic relief measure as bipartisan talks continue

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion Covid-19 relief bill Thursday night as negotiations between the administration and Democrats have failed to yield a bipartisan deal and the time to pass new relief measures ahead of November’s election ticks away.

The measure passed 214-207. No Republicans supported it and 18 Democrats voted against it. Nearly all of the Democrats who voted against the bill are locked in close re-election races.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., said in a statement about why she voted against it. “My focus remains on working with Democrats and Republicans to get relief to my district immediately, and partisan gamesmanship will not do it.”

The legislation, known as Heroes 2.0, is a scaled down version from the Heroes Act, which the House passed in May.

The vote occurred as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin continue to discuss a bipartisan agreement.

Late Thursday, Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol that she spoke to Mnuchin multiple times Thursday but that there was no deal yet.

Asked if one was possible, she said, “I don’t know. It just depends.”

She said that the details matter just as much as how many dollars are being spent, which is an indication that they could be further along in negotiations than they are letting on.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” she said.

According to two sources briefed on the negotiations earlier Thursday, Mnuchin has offered Pelosi a total spending level of $1.62 trillion, up from the $1.5 trillion he had previously suggested.

Inching closer to Pelosi’s demands, Mnuchin agreed to $250 billion more spending for state and local efforts — something President Donald Trump has previously objected to — as well as $150 billion more for the nation’s schools, $75 billion more for testing and tracing efforts, $60 billion for rent and mortgage assistance and $15 billion in food assistance. The details of the offer were first reported by Roll Call.

But on many issues, that offer was still short of what Democrats are demanding.

Mnuchin has also not agreed to re-upping the $600 per week in federal unemployment insurance, offering a level of $400 per week instead, creating a major sticking point for any deal.

“That’s why we not only have a dollars debate,” Pelosi said earlier Thursday, “we have a values debate. Still, I’m optimistic.”

Mnuchin’s proposals are largely similar to those made by the Problem Solvers caucus, a bipartisan congressional group. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., praised the move, saying, “to the extent Secretary Mnuchin has indicated that he will use the Problem Solvers proposal as a basis for any counteroffer actually brings us much closer to an agreement than we’ve ever been.

Even if a deal is reached between Pelosi and Mnuchin, it’s unclear what Senate Republicans would do with a bill or how it would be received

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House Passes $2.2 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Bill in Absence of Bipartisan Deal

WASHINGTON—The House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill Thursday as bipartisan negotiations with the Trump administration dragged on, with Democrats moving forward on their legislation in the absence of a deal with Republicans.

The vote had earlier been postponed to give House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin more time to agree on an aid package. But those conversations haven’t yet yielded a bipartisan agreement.

“We’re still far apart,” Mrs. Pelosi said Thursday. “Hopefully, we can find our common ground on this and do so soon.”

Mrs. Pelosi and Mr. Mnuchin spoke multiple times on Thursday. Mrs. Pelosi said Thursday evening she was going to review documents from Mr. Mnuchin, but no deal was likely Thursday evening.

The legislation passed 214-207, with 18 Democrats joining Republicans in opposition to the bill.

Voters will have a chance to help shape the American economy when they go to the polls in November. WSJ’s Jon Hilsenrath breaks down where President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden stand on key economic issues. Photo Illustration: Carlos Waters/WSJ

The Democratic bill would give money to state and local governments, send another round of stimulus checks to many Americans, reinstate a $600 weekly supplement to unemployment benefits, and give assistance to airlines, restaurants and performance venues, among other measures. Republicans have panned the bill, giving it no chance of passage in the GOP-controlled Senate.

After Mrs. Pelosi put forward her $2.2 trillion plan this week, Mr. Mnuchin made a $1.6 trillion counteroffer, an increase from the $1.5 trillion that the administration had previously signaled it could support. The new offer from Mr. Mnuchin included $250 billion in funding for state and local governments, which has been a key disagreement in the talks. Republicans had earlier offered $150 billion for state and local governments.

The Democrats’ $2.2 trillion price tag marks a reduction from the $3.5 trillion bill House Democrats passed in May. Instead of the $915 billion for state and local governments Democrats originally sought, their new bill now seeks $436 billion for localities and municipalities.

Whether the two sides can close the remaining distance, though, is unclear. White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Thursday that Mrs. Pelosi should accept the administration’s new offer.

“It is a good proposal, but it is one she is not interested in,” she said of Mrs. Pelosi. She didn’t rule out a further revision to the White House position. “Right now, we have the $1.6 trillion number, and I’ll let you know if that number goes up,” she said.

Both the White House and House Democrats are renewing their attempts to reach a deal as the absence of another stimulus bill is beginning to visibly weigh on the economy. With no new aid in sight,

American Airlines Group Inc.

and

United Airlines Holdings Inc.

said they would go forward for now with a total of more than 32,000 job cuts.

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House passes revised coronavirus relief bill, but it’s unlikely to move in the Senate

The House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief bill on Thursday, as the prospects for a deal between Democrats and the White House seem to be fading.  But the bill is unlikely to move through the Republican-led Senate, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated that he would not support any legislation that has a price tag of more than $2 trillion.

The bill passed almost entirely along party lines, with only 18 Democrats voting against it. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters on Thursday that Democrats and the Trump administration were still far apart on issues including funding for state and local governments, and there is “a stark difference not just of dollars, but of values.”

After discussions with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in recent days, Pelosi said the two also remain “way off” on a child tax credit, which Democrats want to have included in any deal. But she also said that they’re “in the ballpark” on health care provisions and assistance for small businesses.

She said that she was “hoping” the House would vote on the revised HEROES Act on Thursday but still expressed some optimism that a deal could be reached with the White House.

“Hopefully, we can find our common ground on this and do so soon,” she said, but she reiterated her argument that a smaller relief bill is not better than no bill at all.

“People say, ‘Isn’t something better than nothing?’ No, there can be an opportunity cost,” Pelosi said in her press conference, giving the example of a tax cut which Republicans would like to include in a final proposal. House members could return to their districts to campaign as soon as Thursday evening, meaning that the window to pass any legislation is closing quickly.

The revised HEROES Act is a slimmed-down version of the $3.4 trillion relief bill the House passed in May. It would restore a popular benefit providing an additional $600 per week on top of unemployment benefits, deliver another round of direct payments and provide funding for schools and state and local jurisdiction.

Some of the more moderate Democrats in the House had pushed Pelosi to put another bill on the floor. The bipartisan House Problem Solvers Caucus introduced a bill that would cost around $2 trillion, and Mnuchin said on Wednesday that his $1.6 trillion counteroffer to Pelosi would be similar to that framework.

A House Democratic aide confirmed to CBS News that Mnuchin and Pelosi were expected to speak on the phone on Thursday afternoon to continue negotiations.

McConnell said Wednesday that “the thought that Senate Republicans would go up to $2.2 trillion is outlandish.”

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany also dismissed Pelosi as being “unserious” in negotiations. She praised the White House offer for a $1.6 trillion proposal, but said Democrats are refusing to budge.

“Nancy Pelosi is not being serious. If she becomes serious, then we can have a discussion here,” McEnany said at a press briefing on Thursday. She added

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House passes Democratic relief bill

U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi participates in a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. September 29, 2020.

Erin Scott | Reuters

The House passed a $2.2 trillion Democratic coronavirus stimulus plan on Thursday night even as Democrats and the Trump administration struggle to strike a relief deal. 

The chamber approved the legislation in a 214-207 vote. Eighteen Democrats voted against the measure as lawmakers in competitive districts grow wary of the ongoing impasse over aid.

The bill likely will not get through the Republican-held Senate and become law. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has opposed the legislation as his caucus resists spending trillions more on the federal response to the pandemic. 

The vote followed a Thursday conversation between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in which they did not forge an aid agreement but agreed to continue talks. They failed to bridge a gulf on a range of issues, including how much aid to send state and local governments and whether to establish a liability shield for businesses and schools. 

Earlier in the day, Pelosi downplayed the possibility that talks with Mnuchin this week offered the last, best chance to approve more relief before the Nov. 3 election. But it is unclear now what could make either side budge, as Democrats call for a sweeping package to boost the economy and health-care system and the GOP worries about injecting too much money into the response.

Congress has failed to pass new rescue funds for months as the country reports tens of thousands of new Covid-19 cases per day and massive corporations plan new layoffs and furloughs. The $600 per week supplemental unemployment benefit, federal moratorium on evictions and window to apply for Paycheck Protection Program loans set up to provide relief during the outbreak all expired weeks ago.

The Democratic bill would:

  • Reinstate the $600 per week enhanced unemployment benefit through January
  • Send a second $1,200 direct payment to most Americans 
  • Give $436 billion in relief over one year to state and local governments 
  • Authorize more money for a second round of Paycheck Protection Program loans for the hardest-hit businesses and industries 
  • Send $25 billion to airlines to cover payroll costs 
  • Inject $75 billion into Covid-19 testing and contact tracing efforts
  • Put $225 billion into education and $57 billion into child care 
  • Set aside billions for rental and mortgage assistance

Mnuchin countered the Democrats’ plan Wednesday with a $1.6 trillion proposal, NBC News reported. It includes $250 billion for state and local government relief, $400 per week in extra unemployment benefits, $150 billion for education, $75 billion for Covid-19 testing and contact tracing, and $60 billion for rental and mortgage assistance, according to NBC. 

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Olympics reform bill passes House after abuse scandals rocked sports

Born out of the sexual abuse scandal that rocked the gymnastics world and toppled the leadership at the USOPC, the Empowering Olympic, Paralympic, and Amateur Athletes Act empowers Congress to decertify individual sports’ governing bodies and dissolve the USOPC’s board of directors. It also calls for better athlete representation in governing bodies and more funding for the U.S. Center for SafeSport, a nonprofit charged by Congress with policing sexual abuse in Olympic sports. Rep. Ted W. Lieu (D-Calif.), co-sponsor of the House bill, called it a potential “sea change.”

“We know from the Larry Nassar scandal and other scandals that we have to make the entire Olympic system much more athlete-centered,” Lieu said in a telephone interview.

Lawmakers from both parties have said they hope Trump will quickly sign it into law. A White House spokesman this week declined to comment on the president’s plans.

The bill effectively means that Congress will keep close watch on Olympic organizations, receiving annual reports and audits, and will be poised to take further action, if needed.

“Laws are dead letter and worse than worthless if they are not effectively enforced,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a co-sponsor in the Senate, said in a phone interview. “So I want to make sure Congress continues its strong oversight. …If there’s a need for more reform, I will have no reluctance to advocate more measures. I have no illusions that this legislation is the end of the story or that it’s a perfect solution. We’ve done our best on this first set of reforms, and I think it’s designed to change the culture and character of these agencies, as well as the culture of sport.”

Some of the biggest potential changes might not be known for months or longer. The bill calls for the creation of a bipartisan commission that will conduct a top-to-to-bottom review of the USOPC and the complicated system of Olympic sports. The group will report its findings to Congress, which could result in a more substantial overhaul of the Olympic framework in the United States, scrutinizing everything from the economic model to the spiderweb of governance.

“It’s gonna send shockwaves through the system,” said Olympian Eli Bremer, a former pentathlete and outspoken critic of the USOPC. “I think there is going to be a lot of changes that come out of this, and some pieces will take a bit of time to understand their true impact.”

Bremer is part of the Committee to Restore Integrity to the USOPC, an advocacy group that worked with lawmakers on the text of the bill, which marks Congress’s most significant Olympic-related undertaking in years. The Amateur Sports Act was originally passed in 1978, empowering the USOPC, and was updated and expanded in 1998.

“The entire system back then was around $1 million, not really big,” Bremer said of the 1978 legislation. “Now it’s probably half a billion to a billion with all the [national governing bodies]. It’s time to start rethinking the system.”

Congress would appoint the

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