Buttigieg says White House is “still in denial about” COVID-19 pandemic as VP debate looms

The coronavirus pandemic will play a central role in Americans being able to “really see the difference” between the Biden-Harris campaign and the Trump White House, said former Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg as both campaigns make final preparations for the October 7 vice presidential debate.

Buttigieg, who was seen Monday in the lobby of a hotel where Senator Kamala Harris is preparing for her debate against Vice President Mike Pence, accused the White House of not wanting to “face reality” in the COVID-19 pandemic.

President Trump returned to the White House after three days at Walter Reed where he was treated for COVID-19. As virus-related fatalities in the U.S. soared above 210,000, Buttigieg said the White House “seems to still be in denial” about the pandemic. 

Kamala Harris will have to contrast that messaging by showing it knows “what it will actually take to confront this pandemic that’s now killed more than 200,000 Americans,” Buttigieg  said on “CBS This Morning” Tuesday.

While the former South Bend, Indiana mayor side-stepped a question on reports that he was acting as Pence in Harris’ debate practice, he did warn the vice president is “a very effective debater.” Vice President Pence served as Indiana governor from 2013 through President Trump’s inauguration in 2017.

“I’ve seen him debating for governor and debating for vice president as well. He has an ability to deliver lines with a high degree of confidence, whether they’re true or not,” Buttigieg said. “But of course, saying something with a straight face doesn’t make it true.” 

He said it was up to Wednesday evening’s moderator, USA Today Washington bureau chief Susan Page, to fact-check the vice president if he wanders from the truth so Harris could “focus on getting out the message about how this country’s going to move forward.” 

Doubts over the Trump administration’s honesty and lack of transparency is leading to an erosion in trust among Americans that Buttigieg called “an incredibly dangerous thing.” 

That lack of trust is the subject of Buttigieg’s new book, “Trust: America’s Best Chance,” in which he argues that trust in each other and U.S. institutions is critical to getting through the tumultuous years he predicts lie ahead. 

He held up Americans’ reactions to the coronavirus pandemic as an example of why trust is critical amid uncertain circumstances.

“Right now researchers are racing against the clock to develop a vaccine, and yet there is polling indicating as many as half of Americans would hesitate to get one,” Buttigieg said. “It’s just one example of how a concept that sounds very theoretical, like social trust, that’s a life and death issue.”

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Interior Design Influenced by a Pandemic

Michelle Harrison-McAllister

With home design heavily relying on functionality, every pandemic has left its mark. Infectious diseases such as typhoid, tuberculosis and cholera have long influenced the way we view and design our homes and COVID-19 is no different. Signs of how designers responded to these diseases have become standard practice in homes today, but not many people even realize it. Changes happening today will continue to evolve over the next decade. Here’s a look at pandemic influences you might not even be aware of and a look into the future.              

The History of Design

References of the impact infectious diseases have had on interior design can be seen as early as mid-19th century London when the outbreak of cholera resulted in certain textiles being perceived as collecting germs, so materials went from textured to smooth. The Victorian era was also impacted by typhoid. The opulent fabrics and wall-to-wall carpets of this time were found to be a breeding ground for dust and disease, causing the shift towards surfaces like linoleum for flooring and white subway tiles that show dirt easily to the naked eye. The early 20th century saw the introduction of the half-bath which was a result of offering a place for delivery workers and guests to wash their hands. By the mid-1920s, coat closets began replacing bulky furniture like armoires that were difficult to move and collected dust.

Looking Toward the Future

Jefferson at Carmel Mountain Ranch. Image courtesy of Michelle Harrison Design

COVID-19 is the latest infectious disease to impact the way we design our homes. Apart from once again bringing awareness to the importance of cleanliness, this pandemic has helped us realize how important our relationship with the outdoors is and the role our home décor plays in our overall happiness, health and spirit. Over the next decade, I predict home design will be focused on our relationship with the outdoors, and improving our health, vitality and mindfulness.

In general, we will begin to see a more organic and holistic approach to our home, paying closer attention to materials, artwork and the incorporation of greenery and plants. Our recent appreciation for the outdoors will be reflected through décor that resembles outdoor living, constructed from natural materials such as wood, marble, brass and rattan, all in their natural finish.

Materials

When we look at materials, not all are treated equally. In fact, some even have antimicrobial properties. Copper, brass and bronze have long been proven to destroy a wide range of bacteria and microorganisms within two hours of exposure, making them the perfect materials to introduce into your home. Apart from their hygienic properties, these metals are also a great way to introduce warmth whether it be through faucets or hardware.

For countertops and other surfaces throughout the home, quartz is one of the most durable materials and is completely nonporous, making this material stain and scratch resistant, as well as antimicrobial. We will also begin to see people embracing wood paneling, in various pattern designs,

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This 95-year-old Peninsula company found a sweet spot during the pandemic: Your kitchen

By Alicia Wallace | CNN Business

When the Covid-19 pandemic hit the US, some businesses held fast and hunkered down. Torani, the 95-year-old company that makes those colorful bottles of flavored syrup at your local coffee shop, didn’t have that luxury.

Torani needed to follow through on a plan that had been years in the making: a relocation of its headquarters and manufacturing operations from South San Francisco to a brand new building across the Bay. The Covid-19 pandemic, however, turned what was already an ambitious and expensive undertaking into a dramatic exercise in operational gymnastics.

Torani was slated to start its move in March to a spacious, 327,000-square-foot San Leandro building that would house its offices and state-of-the-art production lines. It also would serve as a Willy Wonka-esque, tourist-friendly “Flavor Factory” with a coffee-making “receptionista,” a “customer play area” to try some of the 150-plus flavors, and a speakeasy that could be accessed via a secret passageway behind a bookshelf.

But then the shelter-in-place orders came down, and restaurants and cafes were ordered to temporarily close their doors. Torani entered into pandemic planning mode and conducted a financial analysis to determine if it could weather sales drops of 20%, 30% or even 50%.

The company had borrowed around $40 million in loans to invest in its Flavor Factory.

“Could we make it? Could we hold onto everybody?” Torani CEO Melanie Dulbecco told CNN Business. “Could we pay off these loans we just borrowed? Could we keep the business running for our customers and make it?”

The privately held company, which got its start in San Francisco’s “Little Italy” neighborhood of North Beach, has been accustomed to double-digit annual revenue growth for decades. It now was projecting a 40% sales drop for the month of April and bracing for the worst.

Coffee shop sales tanked during that time. According to survey of more than 5,000 shops by payment processor Square, median revenue tumbled 55.4% between March 1 and April 30.

When April was said and done, Torani did have a sales decline on its books, but only 20%.

“And then business came back like crazy,” Dulbecco said.

What happened was that sales of Torani’s syrups started spiking at the retail store level. Americans working remotely during the pandemic had brought their coffee shop habits home with them.

And as the homebound turned to homemaking, Torani syrups and sauces were landing in concoctions such as mixed drinks, kombucha batches, and even sourdough starters, Dulbecco said.

The pickup in store sales also meant that Torani had to increase supplies of its 375-milliliter flip-cap bottles often found at retail. Coffee shops typically buy the bottles that are twice that size.

“We had to shift a lot around in our supply chain to have all the packaging materials,” Dulbecco said.

Torani, which makes syrups used in coffees and Italian sodas, completed a move of its headquarters and manufacturing facility during the pandemic.(Torani) 

Happening in the background of this was the move from

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$800K Loan To Help Hesed House Winterize Shelter During Pandemic

The Daily Beast

Who Actually Declares the Winner of This Election?

By Amy Dacey, The ConversationWith the U.S. presidential election rapidly approaching at a time of extraordinary political and social disruption, the possibility of an unclear or contested result is coming under scrutiny.Unlike many other countries, where the president or prime minister is chosen by direct popular vote, in the U.S., a candidate may win the popular vote and still not be elected to the nation’s highest office. The U.S. also differs from most other democracies in that it has no independent electoral commission to certify the final vote count.So who actually confirms the winner? Step 1: Before Election DayAmerican democracy has many elected officials—state, local and national—and many processes for getting into office.I have been working on election campaigns since I was 8 years old, when my dad ran for school board and I went door to door asking people to vote for him. I’ve also worked on local, congressional, senate and presidential races and now direct an academic research center on politics.What’s striking is that every race is different, from deadlines and filing process to certification. Here, I’ll focus here on the presidential race.The unusual and complicated presidential election certification process in the U.S. entwines all 50 states and the District of Columbia, the Senate, House of Representatives, the National Archives and the Office of the Federal Register. It also involves the Electoral College—a uniquely American institution that convenes in 51 separate locations once every four years to pick the president.This four-month process was custom designed as a compromise by the Founding Fathers, who did not believe the American people should directly choose the president and vice president but did not want to give Congress the power of selection, either.What if Trump Won’t Leave the White House?The Constitution declares that American presidential elections occur on the first Tuesday in November, every four years. But the federal election process actually begins in October, when the Archivist of the United States—a presidential appointee responsible for maintaining the government’s most important official documents—sends a letter to the governor of each state.The document outlines their responsibilities regarding the Electoral College, which is not a place but a process by which electors—people who are chosen by their party—vote for their party’s presidential candidate.The machinery of the Electoral College is complicated, but in short Americans vote for electors and the electors vote for the president. Then, the winner is  Step 2: After Election DayNot quite.Once a final tally of voters’ in-person, mail-in and provisional ballots has been concluded, all 50 governors prepare their state’s Certificate of Ascertainment, a document listing their electors for the competing candidates.Each state completes that process at its own rate. This year, because of the pandemic, finalizing the electoral vote count will likely take a lot longer. Once completed, copies of the Certificate of Ascertainment are then submitted to the U.S. Archivist.After the governor submits names to the Archivist, each state’s Electoral College electors meet in the state capital—D.C.‘s meet

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Kitchen fatigue: Here’s how to beat pandemic weariness and spice up your meals

Chanterelle mushrooms, basil, pasta and fresh parmesan: it’s a great time to turn for some seasonal comfort photo. (Alex Wilkie/Submitted by Andie Bulman)

The early days of this pandemic were terrifying. I spent the first week glued to my screen. I watched every news conference, obsessed over case numbers and signed up for three different streaming services.

Through my social media feeds, I could see that friends and family were doing the same, but gradually things changed.

Fear was replaced with sourdough, banana bread and pitch-perfect flaky pie crust. Anxiety was channelled into impressive kitchen projects. The kitchen became a source of joy.

Well, that has passed.

Most people are back to making the same five dishes on rotation and trying to pass off cleanup duty to their roommates and partners.

We can do better. Here are my tips for fighting kitchen fatigue during a pandemic:

Use an old tool in a new way

Use a tool that’s been gathering dust, or use an everyday tool in a new way. I use my box grater daily for cheese or lemon zest, but I never grate horseradish and I never grate ginger. This week I’m going to make a horseradish mayo and those tiny holes are going to transform the rhizomes of my ginger into a beautiful paste for a cake recipe that I plan to take to the next level. You can use the box grater to make carrot latkes and potato boxtys. There’s so much potential in each kitchen tool.

Turn to comfort foods

A chill in the air is coming, which means we can put a ban on the herb-laced quinoa salads of summers. Now is not the time for heath and wellness, it’s the season of long-simmering stews, homemade apple butter and from-scratch macaroni and cheese. Embrace the foods that bring you warmth.

My personal favourite comfort food is a rich ginger cake. A pulpy mystery novel, a hot cup of tea and a big slice of this cake are my ideal rainy-day fall combination. 

Ginger cake is good at any time of the year, but especially on rainy autumn days with a good book. (Alex Wilkie/Submitted by Andie Bulman)

Get inspired with cookbooks & online resources

Most libraries are now offering pick-up and drop-off services. Spend an hour or two perusing through a collection of cookbooks — but don’t just check a book out! Commit to creating at least two recipes contained within the tome.

I just borrowed Magnuss Neilson’s Nordic Cooking (Phaidon Press, 2015). Admittedly, I’m not going to make his recipe for puffin soup (very frowned upon and illegal here in Newfoundland), but I am going to challenge myself to break out of my rut and recreate two whole recipes.

Play with a newtoyou flavour

If new cookbooks and old equipment can’t bust you out of the depths of kitchen fatigue, try playing with a new flavour. How about bakeapples? A rare yellow berry found in the bogs and barrens

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Tripura’s ‘pandemic kitchen’ provides food to needy amid Covid-19 crisis





© Provided by Hindustan Times


A social organisation has started a ‘langar’ or community kitchen in Tripura to provide free food to the needy, including orphans and old-age home veterans, amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

The ‘langar’ has been named ‘Mohamarir Heshel’ which means ‘pandemic kitchen’ or ‘kitchen during pandemic’.

Sourav Bhattacharjee, a theatre student of Rabindra Bharati University in West Bengal, got the idea to open a community kitchen from langars at Jadavpur in Bengal during the first lockdown in March. He came back to Khowai district of Tripura, his hometown, during Unlock 2.0 and started the pandemic kitchen along with nearly 30 people from different professions.

The organisation comprises graduate and postgraduate students, teachers, advocates, writers, media persons, movie directors, among others. It was started in October with an aim to provide cooked food, once a week, to children living in orphanages and veterans of old-age homes in and around the capital city.

Also read: Donald Trump’s condition had been worse than revealed, confirms White House

They provide rice, dal, vegetables, chicken and a citrus fruit in the meal to children who sit by maintaining social distance.

“Many people lost their source of livelihood during the Covid-19 lockdown. Food is most necessary in this period. So, we are trying to provide meals to the poor at least once a week now,” said Sourav.

The organisation is also looking to open its pandemic kitchen in slums, bordering villages and other areas.

The state has reported 26,552 Covid-19 patients so far, of whom 290 have died. Another two patients died by suicide. Total 21,387 patients have recovered from the disease.

The state has 5.79 lakh poor families including 4.70 lakh priority group and another 1.09 lakh Antodaya Annapurna Yojana (AAY) families, according to state government record. Nearly 1,969 migrant workers are living in the state and among them, many have returned during different Unlock phases.

During the first lockdown in March, the urban development department started community kitchen and provided free meals to the homeless people.

The state government had also requested different non-government organisations and self-help groups to provide food to the homeless.

Earlier, the state government provided Rs. 1,000 to each 8,666 identified hawkers, vendors and others who are engaged in menial jobs. The state also provided free ration to AAY and Below Poverty Line (BPL) families and subsidised ration for Above Poverty Line (APL) families amid the pandemic.

The pandemic kitchen, three days back, provided food to an orphanage located at Aralia in the outskirts of the capital city.

“The Mohamarir Heshel came to our orphanage and provided food to the children. They are doing a very good job,” said Kalyan Dasgupta, one of the founders of the orphanage.

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Trump’s COVID diagnosis thrusts coronavirus pandemic back to forefront of White House race

While Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden heads to the crucial battleground state of Florida on Monday, President Trump is hospitalized at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

After months of mocking the former vice president for his light in-person campaign schedule amid the coronavirus pandemic and ridiculing him for “hiding in his basement” at his home in Delaware, it’s now Trump’s who is sidelined and forced to postpone events, with a month to go until Election Day on Nov. 3, and with millions of Americans already casting absentee ballots or early voting at polling stations.

LIVE UPDATES FROM FOX NEWS ON TRUMP’S HOSPITALIZATION FOR CORONAVIRUS

And with the clock ticking — and the president trailing Biden in the latest public opinion polls in many of the key battleground states that will decide the White House winner — the spotlight in the presidential election has dramatically shifted once again.

Just two weeks after the death of trailblazing Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg rocked the race for the White House, giving the president an opportunity to rally Republicans by moving to quickly confirm a conservative justice to succeed the liberal-leaning Ginsburg on the high court, the focus of the campaign has been upended again.

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is at second from left. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, on Marine One helicopter after he tested positive for COVID-19. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows is at second from left. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The president’s confirmation early Friday morning that he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 instantly put the focus of the White House race firmly back on the coronavirus and the Trump administration’s efforts to fight the pandemic. That was further heightened hours later when Trump was admitted to Walter Reed.

“It’s not good news for the president in that the focus is now going to be on Covid-19, and when the focus is on Covid-19 Biden has a 10, 11, 12-point advantage,” veteran Republican pollster and communications consultant Frank Luntz said on Fox News’ “The Daily Briefing with Dana Perino.”

Luntz stressed that “the economy is Donald Trump’s strength, and the fact that he can’t get out there now is going to be a challenge for the campaign.”

“Fox News Sunday” anchor Chris Wallace agreed that “the coronavirus and the president’s handling of it is going to the top of the agenda.”

Wallace, who moderated Tuesday’s first presidential debate between Biden and Trump, spotlighted on “America’s Newsroom” that the pandemic “becomes the most important issue. … The general feeling on some peoples’ part is that the president hasn’t been cautious enough and that Biden has been too cautious. That’s going to be an issue now going forward.”

The pandemic swept the nation in February and March. Two weeks ago, the nation passed another grim milestone, as more than 200,000 COVID-19-related deaths were recorded, with than 7 million infections confirmed across the country.

Over the past

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Royal Opera House to sell Hockney portrait in bid to survive pandemic



a person sitting in front of a building: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

The Royal Opera House is to sell a David Hockney portrait of its former chief Sir David Webster in a desperate bid to raise funds amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The painting will be auctioned at Christie’s this month and is expected to fetch between £11 million and £18 million, The Observer newspaper reports.

It depicts Sir David, who ran the opera house from 1945 to 1970, and was commissioned for the Covent Garden building in the 1970s.



a person sitting on a table: David Hockney's portrait of Sir David Webster it set to be auctioned at Christie's and should fetch between £11 million and £18 million in a bid to raise vital needed to survive the pandemic


© Provided by Daily Mail
David Hockney’s portrait of Sir David Webster it set to be auctioned at Christie’s and should fetch between £11 million and £18 million in a bid to raise vital needed to survive the pandemic



a couple of people that are standing in a wedding dress: Sir David Webster, who ran the Royal Opera House from 1945 to 1970, greets the Queen Mother as she arrives for a gala performance at the Royal Opera House, in Covent Garden, in 1963


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sir David Webster, who ran the Royal Opera House from 1945 to 1970, greets the Queen Mother as she arrives for a gala performance at the Royal Opera House, in Covent Garden, in 1963

‘This was a really tough call,’ Alex Beard, the ROH’s chief executive, told the Observer.

‘But we have to face the situation we are in and if we can remain viable and get through this, then we can get back to employing people in the future.

‘We are the biggest arts employer in the country and we knew we had to look at any assets we had.

‘And there is only really one of any note that stands out and that is this portrait.’

The sale is part of a four-pronged plan to protect the venue’s standing as the home of the Royal Ballet and of international opera in the face of the pandemic.

That strategy also includes staff redundancies and a major drive for donations, the paper said.

The Royal Opera House says the pandemic had an ‘immediate and serious financial impact’ and that they ‘lost £3 in every £5 of [their] income’ since lockdown forced them to close their doors.

Earlier this year, the Royal Opera House announced it had made an entire roster of casual staff redundant in an effort to stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic. 



a large building with Royal Opera House in the background: The Royal Opera House says the pandemic has cost them £3 of every £5 of their income


© Provided by Daily Mail
The Royal Opera House says the pandemic has cost them £3 of every £5 of their income



a man standing in front of a curtain: Sir David Webster, who served as General Administrator for 25 years, was instrumental in the establishment of the now world famous Royal Ballet and the Royal Opera companies


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sir David Webster, who served as General Administrator for 25 years, was instrumental in the establishment of the now world famous Royal Ballet and the Royal Opera companies

The ROH also confirmed chief executive, Alex Beard, had taken ‘a significant reduction in salary’ and the music director, Sir Antonio Pappano, had waived his salary since the beginning of the Covid-19 lockdown.

The opera house is not the only arts institution facing financial uncertainty due to the pandemic.

Last month, Lucy Noble, artistic and commercial director of the Royal Albert Hall and chair of the National Arenas Association, told the committee that the Government’s £1.57billion rescue package did not turn out to be ‘what it was hailed to be’.

She told the 

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House passes Democratic pandemic relief measure

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion Covid-19 relief bill Thursday night as negotiations between the administration and Democrats have failed to yield a bipartisan deal and the time to pass new relief measures ahead of November’s election ticks away.

The measure passed 214-207. No Republicans supported it and 18 Democrats voted against it. Nearly all of the Democrats who voted against the bill are locked in close re-election races.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., said in a statement about why she voted against it. “My focus remains on working with Democrats and Republicans to get relief to my district immediately, and partisan gamesmanship will not do it.”

The legislation, known as Heroes 2.0, is a scaled down version from the Heroes Act, which the House passed in May.

The vote occurred as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin continue to discuss a bipartisan agreement.

Late Thursday, Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol that she spoke to Mnuchin multiple times Thursday but that there was no deal yet.

Asked if one was possible, she said, “I don’t know. It just depends.”

She said that the details matter just as much as how many dollars are being spent, which is an indication that they could be further along in negotiations than they are letting on.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” she said.

According to two sources briefed on the negotiations earlier Thursday, Mnuchin has offered Pelosi a total spending level of $1.62 trillion, up from the $1.5 trillion he had previously suggested.

Inching closer to Pelosi’s demands, Mnuchin agreed to $250 billion more spending for state and local efforts — something President Donald Trump has previously objected to — as well as $150 billion more for the nation’s schools, $75 billion more for testing and tracing efforts, $60 billion for rent and mortgage assistance and $15 billion in food assistance. The details of the offer were first reported by Roll Call.

But on many issues, that offer was still short of what Democrats are demanding.

Mnuchin has also not agreed to re-upping the $600 per week in federal unemployment insurance, offering a level of $400 per week instead, creating a major sticking point for any deal.

“That’s why we not only have a dollars debate,” Pelosi said earlier Thursday, “we have a values debate. Still, I’m optimistic.”

Mnuchin’s proposals are largely similar to those made by the Problem Solvers caucus, a bipartisan congressional group. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., praised the move, saying, “to the extent Secretary Mnuchin has indicated that he will use the Problem Solvers proposal as a basis for any counteroffer actually brings us much closer to an agreement than we’ve ever been.

Even if a deal is reached between Pelosi and Mnuchin, it’s unclear what Senate Republicans would do with a bill or how it would

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House passes Democratic pandemic relief measure as bipartisan talks continue

WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion Covid-19 relief bill Thursday night as negotiations between the administration and Democrats have failed to yield a bipartisan deal and the time to pass new relief measures ahead of November’s election ticks away.

The measure passed 214-207. No Republicans supported it and 18 Democrats voted against it. Nearly all of the Democrats who voted against the bill are locked in close re-election races.

“Today’s package is another partisan exercise that will never become law,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., said in a statement about why she voted against it. “My focus remains on working with Democrats and Republicans to get relief to my district immediately, and partisan gamesmanship will not do it.”

The legislation, known as Heroes 2.0, is a scaled down version from the Heroes Act, which the House passed in May.

The vote occurred as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin continue to discuss a bipartisan agreement.

Late Thursday, Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol that she spoke to Mnuchin multiple times Thursday but that there was no deal yet.

Asked if one was possible, she said, “I don’t know. It just depends.”

She said that the details matter just as much as how many dollars are being spent, which is an indication that they could be further along in negotiations than they are letting on.

“Even if we came to some agreement, nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. It’s the language,” she said.

According to two sources briefed on the negotiations earlier Thursday, Mnuchin has offered Pelosi a total spending level of $1.62 trillion, up from the $1.5 trillion he had previously suggested.

Inching closer to Pelosi’s demands, Mnuchin agreed to $250 billion more spending for state and local efforts — something President Donald Trump has previously objected to — as well as $150 billion more for the nation’s schools, $75 billion more for testing and tracing efforts, $60 billion for rent and mortgage assistance and $15 billion in food assistance. The details of the offer were first reported by Roll Call.

But on many issues, that offer was still short of what Democrats are demanding.

Mnuchin has also not agreed to re-upping the $600 per week in federal unemployment insurance, offering a level of $400 per week instead, creating a major sticking point for any deal.

“That’s why we not only have a dollars debate,” Pelosi said earlier Thursday, “we have a values debate. Still, I’m optimistic.”

Mnuchin’s proposals are largely similar to those made by the Problem Solvers caucus, a bipartisan congressional group. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., praised the move, saying, “to the extent Secretary Mnuchin has indicated that he will use the Problem Solvers proposal as a basis for any counteroffer actually brings us much closer to an agreement than we’ve ever been.

Even if a deal is reached between Pelosi and Mnuchin, it’s unclear what Senate Republicans would do with a bill or how it would be received

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