WHO chief: Herd immunity strategy ‘unethical’ for tackling pandemic

  • The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that trying to reach herd immunity by allowing COVID-19 to spread is “scientifically and ethically problematic.”
  • “Allowing a dangerous virus that we don’t fully understand to run free is simply unethical,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.
  • His comments, at a press conference on Monday, came days before it emerged the White House was warming to a herd immunity strategy.
  • The WHO estimates that less than 10% of the global population has been exposed to the virus, meaning that the vast majority of people are at risk.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that allowing COVID-19 to spread freely in the hope of achieving herd immunity is “simply unethical.”

WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that herd immunity — where a large portion of a community becomes immune to a virus, limiting its spread — must come through a vaccination, and cannot be achieved by allowing people to become infected. 

His comments, made at a press briefing on Monday, came days before senior US officials said the White House was warming to the herd immunity strategy.

Tedros said that “herd immunity is achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it.”

“Never in the history of public health has herd immunity been used as a strategy for responding to an outbreak, let alone a pandemic. It is scientifically and ethically problematic.”

Too little is known about COVID-19 immunity to be sure if herd immunity can even be achieved, he said, referring to documented cases where people have been infected with the virus for a second time.

The most recent example of a reinfection came on Tuesday, when a man from Nevada tested positive for COVID-19 twice. He suffered worse symptoms the second time around.

Tedros also pointed out that many people experienced long-term health problems after COVID-19 infection. 

“Allowing a dangerous virus that we don’t fully understand to run free is simply unethical,” he said. “It’s not an option.”

The WHO encourages using systems to track, test, and isolate cases of the virus before they spread. 

Less than 10% of the global population has been exposed to the virus, the WHO estimates, meaning that the vast majority of people remain susceptible.

The coronavirus has killed over one million people worldwide and infected more than 37.5 million.

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Upcoming home improvement show at Expo Center to meet spike in projects during pandemic

ROYAL PALM BEACH — Taking advantage of this prolonged stretch at home to make some changes to your surroundings? 



a group of people standing in front of a store: The Expo Center at the South Florida Fairgrounds, seen here during an Antiques Festival in 2009, will play host to the Home Improvement and More Show on Oct. 23-25.


© Palm Beach Post File Photo
The Expo Center at the South Florida Fairgrounds, seen here during an Antiques Festival in 2009, will play host to the Home Improvement and More Show on Oct. 23-25.

You’re not alone, and the staff of the South Florida Fair wants to help.

The Home Improvement and More Show is Oct. 23-25 at the fairgrounds’ Expo Center, 9067 Southern Blvd. The event features more than 60 vendors across 35 categories related to home improvement, said Tim Pachis, corporate sales manager for the South Florida Fair.

More: No stickball in Wellington this year, but Wycliffe league has terrific plan for $60 dues

The show will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23 and Saturday, Oct. 24 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25. Admission and parking are free. 

The expo comes as recent surveys show a spike in home improvement projects in the U.S. since the country essentially shut down in late March because of the novel coronavirus pandemic. 

A Porch.com study released in July found that nearly 80% of homeowners in the U.S. plan to launch a home improvement project in the next year.

More: This Wellington business opened during the pandemic — and it’s thriving

Most home shows since the pandemic were canceled, Pachis said, making the Home Improvement and More Show a rare standout.

While keeping an eye on the increase of demand for home improvement services and products, organizers have the coronavirus in mind for other reasons.

Attendees are required to wear masks, and social distancing is encouraged in the Expo Center, said Vicki Chouris, president and CEO of the South Florida Fair and Palm Beach County Expositions. 

More: Coronavirus has made cancer treatment even lonelier. Here’s how you can help.

Aisles are wider, and vendors are spaced farther apart, she said. 

“We didn’t fill the building to capacity as we really wanted to,” Chouris said. 

There will be hand sanitizer stations throughout the Expo Center, plus the usual soap and water in the restrooms, she added.

“We’re encouraging people just to be smart, be safe,” Chouris said. 

This marks the first time the fair staff has produced a home improvement show, she said. 

The shift last month to Phase 3 of the state’s reopening plan didn’t change the measures event organizers are taking at the Expo Center, Chouris said. 

This isn’t the first event held at the indoor venue since March, and the events that have taken place have been successful in terms of safety and customer service, she said. 

Very few people who have come to events have balked at wearing masks, Chouris said. 

“We just tell them, it’s for the safety of everyone right now,” she said.

History on the Rocks

Coming up in November: The second History on the Rocks event at Yesteryear Village at the South Florida Fairgrounds. 

The event, 6 to

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Home Improvement Market Sees Surge During Pandemic

Financialnewsmedia.com Market Commentary

PALM BEACH,  Fla., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Analysts expect home improvement spending to reach $439.9 billion in 2020 – In the time of a global pandemic, there is indeed no place like home. As millions of Americans practice social distancing while working and learning remotely, the home has become the focal point of our lives. The desire to make residences safer, more comfortable and more enjoyable has led to a home improvement boom.   Mentioned in today’s commentary includes:  NeoVolta (OTCQB: NEOV), Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA), Home Depot (NYSE: HD) and Lowe’s (NYSE: LOW).

The Home Improvement Research Institute predicts Americans will spend $439.9 billion on home improvement products in 2020. The online home remodeling platform Houzz reports that demand for kitchen and bath remodeling was up 40% year over date in June 2020, while home additions increased 52% and fencing projects jumped 166%. Pool and hot tub installations are seeing a wave of strong demand across the country. 

Home renewable energy is also seeing a surge as storage batteries are being installed in more households. According to the U.S. Energy Storage Monitor, the energy storage industry saw record-breaking deployments during the second quarter of 2020, and rapid expansion is expected to continue. A total of 168 MW and 288 MWh of energy storage was deployed in the quarter, second only to Q4 2019 as the highest on record, according to the joint report by Wood Mackenzie and the U.S. Energy Storage Association.

With Americans nesting like never before, four of the companies active in-home improvement are: NeoVolta (NEOV), Tesla (TSLA), Home Depot (HD) and Lowe’s (LOW).

NeoVolta (OTCQB: NEOV) – San Diego based NeoVolta, whose stock is trading around $4 per share, is the only pure-play energy storage company on this list. Recently NeoVolta announced an exclusive distribution agreement with Nevada-based PMP Energy. In exchange for making minimum purchases of up to $15 million, PMP Energy can secure specific geographic exclusivities for distribution over the three-year term of the agreement.

NeoVolta has significantly expanded its distribution network in recent months. In addition to Southern California, installations are now available in Northern California and Nevada. The company has doubled its production in 2020 and plans to quadruple capacity by the end of this year. NeoVolta’s NV14 storage system was named one of Solar Power World’s Top Solar Storage Products of 2019.    

Read more about NEOV and recent news developments by visiting: https://www.neovolta.com/news/

Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) – Tesla, the carmaker whose stock is trading about $415 per share, is also a major player in home energy storage. Since its 2015 launch, the Powerwall has been Tesla’s flagship residential storage product. It has a lithium ion battery and a storage capacity of 13.5 kWh. The Powerwall can be added to a system with a backup generator connected through an external automatic transfer switch (ATS) or manual transfer switch (MTS). Because the Powerwall and generator are not directly integrated, the Powerwall cannot

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Community garden provides refugees with support and comfort through pandemic

A community garden in Seattle, Washington is providing a place for immigrants and refugees to come together and find community while growing food from their home countries.

Once a neglected parking lot, the garden, known as Paradise Parking Plots, is now a place for people to gather and tend to their plants.

Community members bond while growing their own food in the garden. (Hannah Letinich)
Community members bond while growing their own food in the garden. (Hannah Letinich)

“We have de-paved over 50,000 square feet of asphalt and put in garden beds,” said Tahmina Martelly, a program manager for World Relief Seattle, which founded the garden. “We have 44 in-ground beds and six handicap access beds. We have people from 23 countries growing culturally appropriate foods and making friends with each other.”

Martelly, who immigrated to the United States from Bangladesh and has worked in refugee resettlement for more than two decades, said that the space has only become more important amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Signs show the different regions that plants and their growers come from. (Adam Kaufman)
Signs show the different regions that plants and their growers come from. (Adam Kaufman)

“We see gardeners in this garden who are coming in the middle of a pandemic and growing their food,” Martelly said. “Often, I’ll have gardeners tell me, ‘My plants don’t know there’s a pandemic. We expect to have food, because we put the work in.’ Having the power to grow your own food, a virus can’t take that away.”

Gardeners include Prem Adhikari, a Bhutanese refugee who grows mustard greens and long sod beans and has been working in the garden for over three years.

“It’s very difficult to go to market and buy the vegetable … (but) we have a garden, like a life to meet other people,” Adhikari said. “… It’s a lot of fresh, green, without chemical vegetables.”

Immigrants and refugees grow foods from their home countries that might be unavailable in the United States. (Hannah Letinich)
Immigrants and refugees grow foods from their home countries that might be unavailable in the United States. (Hannah Letinich)

In recent years, the garden’s mission has grown. Martelly said the organization now offers a summer academy where children learn about science in the garden. Even amid the pandemic, children have been able to get outside and learn about the world around them. Those classes are taught by interns like Risa Suho, who immigrated from the Philippines in 2008.

“As an immigrant, it’s super important, especially for these younger children, to see someone who kind of looks like them and can relate to their experience,” said Suho, who primarily teachers kindergarten and first grade-age students. “… Not to make my head sound super big, but I think it’s slightly inspirational if kids look up to teachers. They are leaders to kids. I couldn’t imagine what it would be like for me if I was younger, if I saw someone who was like me in a leadership position.”

Children learn at a community summer camp in Paradise Parking Plots. (Hannah Letinich)
Children learn at a community summer camp in Paradise Parking Plots. (Hannah Letinich)

Martelly said that the garden is a place for immigrants to form friendships and other close connections.

“Many of these countries are in conflict with each other, and people will say, ‘Our

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Durham Fire Department notes increase in kitchen fires during COVID-19 pandemic

DURHAM, N.C. (WTVD) — The aftermath of a fire can be shocking.

“It’s more than just you burn up your favorite pan and have to throw it in the trash. And it can happen really, really quickly,” said Elaine Towner, Durham Fire Department life safety educator.

That’s why every October, the Durham Fire Department tries educate residents about fire safety before it’s too late.

This year is all about safety in the kitchen. Durham firefighters said they have seen an increase in kitchen fires during the pandemic.

“There are a lot of distractions going on in people’s’ homes because that’s where they are all the time and it’s really easy to lose track of what’s going on in your kitchen,” Towner said.

RELATED: Raleigh family escapes fire tragedy thanks to 4-year-old child’s quick thinking

Towner says the number one way to prevent a kitchen fire-don’t leave your stove unattended if you’re cooking and don’t leave anything on the counter that could catch on fire. If you’re cooking with grease, keep a pot lid nearby.

“If it flares up, put the lid on it and turn the stove off,” Towner said.

During fire prevention month, firefighters usually spend a lot of time talking to school groups to spread their safety messages, but the pandemic put those presentations on pause. For now, they’ve gone virtual by creating educational videos on their Durham Fire and Life Safety Facebook page.

Towner said firefighters are still answering calls for help.

“It does take a little bit longer to get all that PPE on and get into the home but they’re still coming. We’re still running calls,” Towner said.

If you would like to share those educational videos with your family, click here.

SEE MORE: Fire escape planning with your family

Durham Fire Department said teachers can request virtual fire prevention classes and virtual field trips for their students. For more information, visit the Durham Fire Department website and submit a community service request.

Copyright © 2020 WTVD-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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How Kolkata’s Chowman launched two new restaurants and a cloud kitchen amidst the pandemic

Bengal and Bengalis can go on for years debating over Mohun Bagan and East Bengal, CPIM and Trinamool, and Ilish and chingri. But one thing that all bengalis seem to agree on is Chinese food and music. And Kolkata-based Debaditya Chaudhury seems to have made it to the heart of Bengalis through both. 

The musician-turned-entrepreneur is the founder and Managing Director of Kolkata’s leading chain of Chinese restaurants, Chowman. Starting as a small restaurant in Kolkata in 2010, today Chowman has 15 outlets spread across the city. It has also extended its wings and recently launched a cloud kitchen in Bengaluru

“My aim was to create a human character, similar to KFC and McDonald’s. I wanted to go with Mr Chow in Town, but we were not able to get registration for that name. I then decided on Chowman, which sounds similar to Chowmein — the first thing Indians think of when they think Chinese,” Debaditya tells SMBStory

Chowman claims to have recorded a ten-fold increase in its delivery and takeaway services during the pandemic, and has also managed to retain its set of loyal customers. 

Chowman

Debaditya Chowdhury, Founder and Managing Director of Chowman

Love for food and music 

After completing his graduation from St Xavier’s College, Kolkata, Debaditya went on to pursue MBA from IISWBM. However, his mind and heart was always towards music and food. 

“Growing up in a house next to Kim Wah (a popular Chinese restaurant in Kolkata), my passion for Chinese food started at a tender age. I dreamed of opening a restaurant in my hometown since my college days,” says Debaditya, who is also the founding member and keyboardist of Bengali rock band Lakkhicchara.

His love for the cuisine was almost innate and it took physical form in 2010. Debaditya invested Rs 15 lakh and started Chowman as a 20-seater restaurant in South Kolkata’s Golf Gardens. 

Along with his brother, Shiladitya Chaudhury, Debaditya has also founded Oudh 1590, a period dining Awadhi restaurant. 

Chowman

Debaditya is the founding member and key guitarist of Bengali rock bank Lakkhicchara | Image Source: Team Chowman

Swimming through hurdles 

 “My goal with Chowman was to democratise fine dining and make the five-star quality experience available at affordable prices,” Debaditya says. 

When he first started the restaurant chain, he sourced all the raw materials — spices, sauces, and even chopsticks from various parts of Hong Kong and Thailand. “Even the decor at our outlets were designed by craftsmen from China,” he says. 

However, with expansion, Debaditya made a shift and now sources all the raw materials from various parts of India in order to “support farmers in our country,” he adds. 

Chowman

Even the décor at Chowman’s outlets are designed by craftsmen from China | Image Source: Team Chowman

The Chinese restaurant chain initially faced challenges in terms of finding the right neighbourhood to set up the restaurants. Since most of Chowman’s restaurants are located at key locations across Kolkata, neighbouring

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Haunted house attractions in the pandemic: What you’ll see in 2020

(CNN) — It feels like 2020 has provided more than enough scares. But for people still seeking an extra jolt of fear and adrenalin, it’s the time of year for those shocking haunted house attractions.

While the Covid-19 pandemic has curtailed a lot of long-distance travel, especially by plane, these Halloween-themed attractions around the world usually draw a more local crowd. So they shouldn’t be hurt by people making more short-haul trips this year.

They do face other hurdles, though.

In the carefree nights of 2019, the big questions on these attractions were: Which ones are the best? How scary are they?

In the cautious nights of 2020, we have different questions: Are haunted house attractions even opening this year? And if they are, is it safe to go?

With cases of Covid-19 again on the rise, medical experts advise a careful approach.

A mix of openings and closings

The results: Seven are open this year. Three have decided to shutter for 2020. The seven that are open are:

The Bates Motel is taking reservations in 2020.

The Bates Motel is taking reservations in 2020.

Christopher Brielmaier/Rogues Hollow Productions/Bates Entertainment Group

— Bates Motel, 1835 Middletown Road, Glen Mills, Pennsylvania 19342; +1 610 459 0647
— The Dent Schoolhouse, 5963 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45248; +1 513 445 9767
— Erebus, 18 S Perry St.., Pontiac, Michigan 48342; +1 248 332 7884
— Haunted Overload, 20 Orchard Way, Lee, New Hampshire 03861; +1 855 504 2868
— Netherworld Haunted House, 1313 Netherworld Way, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30087; +1-404-608-2484
— Scream Town, 7410 US-212, Chaska, Minnesota 55318; +1 888 317 7308
— The 13th Gate: 832 St Philip St, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70802; +1 225 389 1313

Citing safety concerns because of Covid-19, three of 2019’s top 10 decided not to reopen. They are Freakling Bros. Trilogy of Terror in Las Vegas, the Haunted Trail of Balboa Park in San Diego and Scared by the Sound (at Playland Park) in Rye, New York.

A longtime Las Vegas favorite, Freaking Bros. Trilogy of Terror decided not to open for the 2020 season.

A longtime Las Vegas favorite, Freaking Bros. Trilogy of Terror decided not to open for the 2020 season.

Edison Graff www.stardustfallout.com

In a message to fans on its website, Freaking Bros. in Nevada said, “Current regulations will not allow us to present our horror shows with the intensity that we are famous for, nor can we guarantee a way to protect our patrons or our valued employees and volunteers properly during this pandemic.

“After months of deliberation and careful assessment, we’ve regretfully had to acknowledge that the only responsible way to handle this is to put safety first, and close for the 2020 season.”

The venues that are opening are emphasizing Covid-19 safety.

The 13th Gate is where folks in Louisiana find their thrills.

The 13th Gate is where folks in Louisiana find their thrills.

13th Gate

For example, the 13th Gate in Louisiana has an entire page devoted to Covid-19 measures. Visitors to amusement parks this past summer will find this all quite familiar.

13th Gate’s measures include mandated masks for guests and actors, virtual queues, reduced capacity, temperature screenings and new setups to maintain

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Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?

With fiscal second-quarter sales growth of 23.4%, it’s safe to say Home Depot (NYSE: HD) has performed quite well during the coronavirus pandemic. As an essential business, the home improvement behemoth was able to keep its doors open to serve the needs of millions of shoppers.



a close up of a newspaper: Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?


© Provided by The Motley Fool
Is Home Depot a Safe Bet During the Pandemic?

Its stock price has risen 30% so far this year, driven by impressive results from the do-it-yourself (DIY) segment. But for Home Depot to position itself for long-term success, its Pro business is the key.

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Pandemic-fueled growth

From fiscal 2009 through fiscal 2019, Home Depot’s sales increased at a compound annual rate of 5.2%. The company has largely left its store growth unchanged with less than 50 net additions in that 10-year period, but management introduced initiatives like the One Home Depot strategy to boost efficiency within its existing store network. The company has reported positive comparable-sales growth for 10 years running.

Then, the coronavirus pandemic took hold earlier this year, closing down large swathes of the U.S. economy and at the same time creating an advantageous environment for Home Depot. With Americans stuck inside their homes, many chose to prioritize home improvement projects over other leisure and entertainment spending that has not been available in 2020.



a close up of a newspaper: coronavirus headlines sitting on top of 100 dollar bills


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coronavirus headlines sitting on top of 100 dollar bills

In the quarter ended Aug. 2, the company generated record-breaking sales of $38.1 billion. Supported by government stimulus measures, including deposits of $1,200 made to most Americans’ bank accounts, Home Depot’s DIY segment outpaced its Pro segment in the quarter. The money not spent on dining out and travel instead went toward fixing up the home.

Professional customers

The success with the DIY customer is promising for Home Depot, but its future relies on the Pro segment. In 2017, the company began a multiyear, $11 billion program to bolster its digital offerings and to improve its Pro customer experience. These customers are vital to Home Depot as they provide the retailer an opportunity to build long-term, mutually beneficial relationships with professional contractors and property developers that lead to repeat business.

The Pro customer usually makes larger and more frequent purchases, and Home Depot has the opportunity to generate more revenue from this relationship over time. The company sees a significant market opportunity with the Pro segment and has built a comprehensive ecosystem to serve its specific needs. This includes inventory management, volume discounts, best-in-class sales teams, and online business solutions. Pro customers currently represent about 45% of the company’s top line.

Although the Pro market has lagged DIY in recent months, revenue did grow double digits year over year in the fiscal second quarter. Property owners were reluctant to undergo major projects during the pandemic since safety was the main focus: Allowing outsiders into the home to complete renovations or other upgrades did not seem prudent.

However, Ted Decker, executive vice president for merchandising, said during the most

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How Two Music Industry Professionals Launched A New Business During A Pandemic

When the pandemic hit the U.S. in March, married couple “Zito” and Christin Zito were trying to figure out next steps. Zito, who spent the past 20 years on the road most recently serving as production manager for Steve Aoki, and Christin, a celebrity hair and makeup stylist, weren’t sure what to do.

On Easter Sunday the couple was planning a cheat meal for their diet and Zito had a sourdough starter already made. While brainstorming what to make with it, they settled on sourdough cinnamon rolls. Having previously baked sourdough bread during Covid-19, the Zitos immediately knew there was something special about the sourdough cinnamon rolls. When Christin posted a photo on Instagram of their cheat meal, the outpouring of comments from people wanting a roll for themselves got them thinking. Soon, the couple began selling cinnamon rolls in their subdivision in Tennessee and the first weekend they sold 63 rolls, the following weekend 83 and by the third weekend they baked and sold over 120 sourdough cinnamon rolls.

MORE FROM FORBESCole Swindell Returns To The Stage With Fireplay’s Virtual Crowd

“By the fourth week we had over 200 orders,” Zito tells me. “[I thought] ‘OK, I think we’re onto something here.’ So how can we scale it? How can we grow it? And how can we move it towards a business that can sustain us during this time?”

Logistically minded, his day job as a production manager for the past 21 years had Zito responsible for all aspects of a touring show including hiring the lighting and sound team, video crew and trucking. Zito then took these organizational skills into the kitchen. Zito’s logistics know-how combined with Christin’s expertise with a social media management company she launched during the pandemic had the pair merging their strengths to form Rock N Rollz Nashville.

“It was the perfect marriage. As [the company] grew, it told us what needed to happen for the business,” Christin says. “At the time we were just week by week, trying to figure it out.”

Since the end of May, the Zitos have made 14,300 rolls and now average orders of 1400 rolls a week. Every sourdough cinnamon roll is rolled by hand and hand frosted with salted vanilla buttercream, the very same frosting the couple made for themselves on Easter Sunday.

For every roll purchased, 50 cents goes to MusiCares, a non-profit that helps music industry professionals in times of need. The decision to give back to the music community was made early on in the formation of Rock N Rollz Nashville as the Zitos explain that

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Mason jar shortage is because of more pandemic cooking and canning

The increase in the number of people cooking and trying recipes during the pandemic has led to a surge in canning — because experienced canners are doing it more and novices want to give it a try.



a close up of food on a counter: Jars used for canning foods are in short supply this year.


© Shutterstock
Jars used for canning foods are in short supply this year.

And that surge has led to a shortage in Mason jars and lids.

“There’s so many more people canning this year than have ever canned. We have seen a big upswing in new people trying to can,” said Nellie Oehler, the coordinator for Oregon’s statewide food preservation hotline, who added she’s been answering lots of calls from around the nation about the lack of supply.

Marie Bregg, the owner of Mason Jar Merchant, a canning jar supplier, said she started seeing a huge increase in demand in the middle of August.

“Our sales basically went up 600% that week and haven’t dropped since,” she said.

Most of the demand is for the two-part lids necessary for canning, because they are single-use, whereas the glass jars can be used over and over. The lids have a disc that sits on the mouth of the jar with a ring that screws on around it, but after one use, the seal around the disc breaks down and can’t safely be used again.

The reasons behind the shortage

Bregg and Oehler said they attribute the demand to the amount of extra time people had at home since the pandemic started. And people who haven’t canned very much, or at all, are getting in on the trend.

“I call it ‘Sourdough 2.0’ — it was the next craze of what people are doing in the kitchen because they have extra time,” Bregg said. Back in the spring, baking sourdough bread was all the rage as everyone exercised new cooking skills — and for a long while, it caused a shortage of yeast.

During lockdown, people also planted bigger gardens than they normally would have and then had to figure out how to preserve what they grew.

The boom in gardening “meant that people for the first time are going to have either their first-time crops or bigger crops than they’ve had before. They’re going to have to do something with it,” said Joel MacCharles, who writes about canning and co-founded the website Well Preserved.

What this has meant for suppliers

Those are the same reasons given by Newell Brands, which manufactures the leading brands of canning jars like Ball and Kerr.

“Consumers staying home over the last few months due to the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in shifts in demand for food storage containers like Ball canning jars and lids,” a company spokesperson said in a statement.

“As more consumers prepare their meals at home, Ball brand canning products and the entire canning industry have experienced an unprecedented demand. The demand has resulted in supply constraints, extended lead times and recently limited product availability at stores and online.”

Newell said it’s working “rapidly” to

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