White House physician says Trump oxygen level dropped twice

  • White House physician Sean Conley admitted at a Sunday press briefing that President Trump was given supplemental oxygen on Saturday, which he declined to acknowledge the day before.
  • “I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, over his course of illness, has had,” Conley said.
  • Conley’s statements would back up White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, who expressed concerns about Trump’s condition on Saturday.
  • Since Friday, Trump has received a second dose of the antiviral drug remdesivir, along with a dose of dexamethasone, to fight the coronavirus.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

White House physician Sean Conley admitted at a Sunday briefing that President Trump was given supplemental oxygen on Saturday, which he declined to acknowledge at yesterday’s briefing.

“I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, over his course of illness, has had,” he said. “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so, came off as if we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true. He is doing really well and…if everything continues to go well, we’re going to start discharge plans back to the White House.”

This revelation would support statements made by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows the day before, on Saturday, regarding Trump’s condition as he battles the coronavirus.

Meadows said that Trump experienced a “very concerning” period on Friday when his blood oxygen level dropped and he developed a high fever, and faced a “critical” 48-hour period at the Walter Reed Military Medical Center, according to The Associated Press. He also said that Trump was “not on a clear path yet to a full recovery.”

At one point, Trump’s oxygen levels dropped to 93%, according to the doctors, below the 95% figure that is cited as the lower limit for normal blood-oxygen saturation.

 

Late Saturday, Conley said that the medical team overseeing Trump was “cautiously optimistic” but that the President was “not yet out of the woods.”

Dr. Brian Garibaldi said Trump also received a second dose of the antiviral drug remdesivir, along with a dose of dexamethasone.

Garibaldi said that Trump is “up and well” and that the medical team wanted him to remain active on Sunday.

Trump has been at Walter Reed since Friday after he and First Lady Melania Trump announced that they had contracted the coronavirus, and the medical team said that he could be discharged as early as Monday if his condition warrants a release.

LoadingSomething is loading.

Source Article

Read more

White House Physician Says Trump Had Been Given Supplemental Oxygen and Dexamethasone

“The president has continued to improve. As with any illness, there are frequent ups and downs over the course, particularly when a patient is being so closely watched. Over the course of his illness, the president has experienced two episodes of transient drops in his oxygen saturation. We debated the reasons for this, and whether we’d even intervene. It was the determination of the team based predominantly on the timeline from the initial diagnosis that we initiate dexamethasone. I’d like to take this opportunity now, given some speculation over the course of the illness the last couple of days, update you on the course of his own illness: Thursday night into Friday morning, when I left the bedside, the president was doing well with only mild symptoms and his oxygen was in the high 90s. Late Friday morning, when I returned to the bedside, the president had a high fever and his oxygen saturation was transiently dipping below 94 percent. Given these two developments, I was concerned for possible rapid progression of the illness. I recommended [to] the president we try some supplemental oxygen [and] see how he’d respond. He was fairly adamant that he didn’t need it. He was not short of breath. He was tired, had the fever and that was about it. And after about a minute on only two liters, his saturation levels were back over 40 — over 95 percent.” “Today he feels well. He’s been up and around or plan for today is to have him to eat and drink, be up out of bed as much as possible to be mobile. And if he continues to look and feel as well as he does today, our hope is that we can plan for a discharge as early as tomorrow to the White House where he can continue his treatment course.” “Dr. Conley, you said there were two instances where he had drops in oxygen. Can you walk us through the second one?” “Yeah, yesterday there was another episode where he dropped down, about 93 percent. He doesn’t ever feel short of breath. We watched it, and it returned back up.” [crosstalk] “Why did it take until today to disclose that the president had been administered oxygen?” “That’s a good question. Thank you. I was trying to reflect the upbeat attitude that the team, the president, that his course of illness, has had. I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction. And in doing so, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true. And so I have, here I have it. He is — the fact of the matter is is that he’s doing really well.”

Source Article

Read more

Trump given supplemental oxygen on Friday: White House doctor

White House physician Sean Conley on Sunday disclosed that President TrumpDonald John TrumpJaime Harrison debates Graham behind plexiglass shield Doctors, White House staff offer conflicting messages on president’s health Trump given second dose of Remdesivir ‘without complication’, ‘not yet out of the woods’, Conley says MORE had received supplemental oxygen following his coronavirus diagnosis, a day after the doctor sidestepped questions about whether the president had received oxygen over the course of his treatment.

Conley said that he recommended the president be given supplemental oxygen on Friday. He indicated it was possible Trump also received supplemental oxygen on Saturday.

“Late Friday morning, when I returned to the bedside, the president had a high fever and his oxygen saturation was transiently dipping below 94 percent,” Conley told reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Sunday.

Conley also said that Trump has experienced two episodes of transient drops in his oxygen levels since he was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus late Thursday evening. The second episode, which the doctor said occurred Saturday morning, lead doctors to begin treating Trump with dexamethasone, a steroid that is used to reduce inflammation.

Conley disclosed the new information after dancing around questions on Saturday about whether the president had received supplemental oxygen during his first briefing about the president’s COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment.

Asked why it took him so long to disclose that Trump had been given supplemental oxygen, Conley said that he was trying to “reflect the upbeat attitude” that the team and president have had over the course of his illness. Conley denied that he was trying to conceal any information.

“In doing so, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessary true,” Conley told reporters. “The fact of the matter is that he is doing really well.”

The president’s team of doctors continued to offer a positive assessment of Trump’s condition, saying that his symptoms have improved and that he could be discharged as soon as Monday.

Even as Conley disclosed more specific information about the president’s treatment, he avoided answering questions about what X-rays and CT scans had revealed and whether Trump’s lungs had been damaged.

Asked whether Trump is being held in a negative pressure room, Conley declined to “get into the specifics of his care.”

Conley also said that he didn’t know whether Trump had received another dose of supplemental oxygen on Saturday, the second time he experienced a drop in his oxygen level, adding that he would need to check with the president’s nurses.

Sunday’s briefing came as the White House faced a mountain of questions on the president’s condition after offering conflicting messages over the weekend.

In his first briefing with reporters about the president’s health on Saturday, Conley conveyed that Trump was doing “very well,” that his symptoms of a mild cough, nasal congestion and fatigue were improving, and that he had been fever-free for 24 hours.

But Conley sidestepped questions on the president’s condition and treatment and misstated

Read more

Trump’s physician hopeful he could return to White House as soon as tomorrow despite two drops in oxygen levels

President Donald Trump’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, said Sunday morning that the President has had at least two concerning drops in oxygen levels, but is doing well and he is hoping Trump could be discharged as early as tomorrow from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.



a man talking on a cell phone: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Some seven months into a pandemic that has killed more than 209,000 Americans, the nation is now facing a grave governing crisis with its commander in chief hospitalized — his condition hinging on his progress over the coming days — as the White House events of the past week serve as a textbook example of how not to handle a deadly virus.

Late Saturday night, the public learned new details about why Trump was airlifted to the hospital Friday, when chief of staff Mark Meadows said during an interview with Fox News that Trump had a fever on Friday morning and his oxygen level had “dropped rapidly.” Meadows added that Trump has made “unbelievable improvements from yesterday morning.”

A memo from Trump’s physician earlier Saturday night said that Trump had “made substantial progress” since his diagnosis but “is not yet out of the woods.”

Speaking from a White House that already has a huge credibility problem with the public, Meadows’ statement capped a 24-hour period that served as a master class in opacity and contradiction that raised major questions about the President’s health — and renewed questions about this administration’s ability to tell the truth.

Trump has been watching and critiquing coverage of his hospitalization from the presidential suite at Walter Reed and has been agitated at what he claims are exaggerated descriptions of his condition, people familiar with the matter said.

Those people told CNN that Trump seemed particularly upset when he saw a quote saying he was displaying “concerning” symptoms on Friday attributed to a person familiar with his health but later assigned by the New York Times and Associated Press to Meadows.

The comment about the President’s vitals hinted that his condition was more worrisome than his doctors let on. But the President’s aversion to appearing weak and sick is now what is driving the effort to project resolve, including a video he tweeted from Walter Reed on Saturday, the photos released by the White House of him working and the multiple accounts of phone calls where he sounded strong by his allies and family members.

For much of this year, Trump has spun an alternate reality about the dangers of coronavirus — disputing science and the efficacy of masks, downplaying the risks to the American people, and making false statements about how 99% of coronavirus cases in America are

Read more

Trump received oxygen at the White House before heading to Walter Reed, sources say

 

White House official says Trump received first rapid test on Thursday night

A White House official told CBS News that Mr. Trump received a rapid test Thursday night after he returned from an event at his club in Bedminster, New Jersey. The White House learned of Trump adviser Hope Hicks’s positive test on Thursday, “minutes” before the president was supposed to leave for New Jersey. Several staff members were then pulled from the trip at that time. 

The official told CBS News that Mr. Trump took the rapid test when he returned to Washington because of Hicks’ diagnosis. The rapid coronavirus test came back positive, which prompted the PCR test to confirm. When Mr. Trump called into “Hannity” on Thursday evening, he had already received the positive rapid test and was awaiting the PCR results. The results came late Thursday evening, and he tweeted them shortly after, the official said. 

The official said the president had not exhibited symptoms in New Jersey. The official noted he seemed “a little tired,” though the official chalked that up to the late returns to the White House the previous two nights. 

Asked repeatedly why the president had not taken a test prior to his departure to New Jersey upon the White House learning of Hope’s positive result, the official said they assumed the president had received a negative test earlier in the day, but was unable to confirm whether that was the case. The official noted the president has said in the past both that he is tested “regularly” and “daily.” 

 

McConnell says Trump “sounds well” after phone call

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell tweeted on Saturday afternoon that he had spoken to Mr. Trump by phone, and that the president “sounds well.”

“Just had another great call with @POTUS. He sounds well and says he’s feeling good. We talked about the people’s business — fighting the pandemic, confirming Judge Barrett, and strengthening the economy for American families. Let’s keep our President & First Lady in our prayers,” McConnell said.

McConnell announced earlier on Saturday that he would seek to obtain a consent agreement for the Senate to meet in pro forma sessions until October 19. However, he said that the Judiciary Committee would continue with confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett as planned.

 

Trump campaign launches “Operation MAGA” for surrogates to take to the trail

Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, who has tested positive for COVID-19, said in a statement that the campaign would launch “Operation MAGA” for surrogates to take to the campaign trail while the president is recuperating.

“Operation MAGA will fire up the entire MAGA universe to keep President Trump’s campaign at full speed until our Commander-in-Chief returns to the campaign trail,” Stepien said. “Vice President Mike Pence, the First Family, our coalitions, and our grassroots supporters will be out in full force to show the real enthusiasm behind the President’s re-election and to show we’re working as hard as he always

Read more

Donald Trump Is Taking Remdesivir, Doesn’t Need Supplemental Oxygen, White House Says

Late Friday evening, the White House announced that President Donald Trump did not need supplemental oxygen, and had started taking Remdesivir for his COVID-19.



a man standing in front of a building: President Donald Trump, shown here leaving the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, is beginning Remdesivir therapy.


© Drew Angerer/Getty
President Donald Trump, shown here leaving the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, is beginning Remdesivir therapy.

The White House released a statement from official presidential physician, Dr. Sean P. Conley at 11:34 p.m. on Twitter from the account of press secretary Kayleigh McEnany.

“This afternoon, in consultation with specialists from Walter Reed and Johns Hopkins University, I recommended movement of the President up to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for further monitoring. This evening I am happy to report that the President is doing very well. He is not requiring supplemental oxygen, but in consultation with specialists we have elected to initiate Remdesivir therapy. He has completed his first dose and is resting comfortably,” Conley wrote.

World Reacts To Donald Trump, First Lady Melania Testing Positive For Coronavirus

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Trump himself tweeted shortly before, at 11:31 p.m., in his second tweet since his diagnosis.

“Going welI, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!” the president wrote.

Trump’s other tweet Friday evening, posted at 6:31 p.m., was to announce that he was being admitted to Walter Reed in an 18-second video.

“I want to thank everybody for the tremendous support,” Trump said in the video. “I’m going to Walter Reed hospital. I think I’m doing very well but we’re going to make sure that things work out. The first lady is doing very well.”

“So thank you I appreciate it, I will never forget it,” he added.

Newsweek reached out to the White House for comment.

According to the White House, Trump has only shown mild symptoms, including fatigue and fever. Donald J. Trump Jr. told Tucker Carlson on Fox News Friday evening that the president had been taken to Walter Reed out of an “abundance of caution.”

In addition to the Remdesivir, Trump is being given an experimental antibody treatment from Regeneron. The treatment is called REGN-COV2, and though it is still in clinical trials, the drug is being is being administered to the president under the “compassionate use” provision of the Food and Drug Administration’s guidelines.

Conley said earlier Friday that Trump was also being given zinc, vitamin D, the acid reflux drug famotidine, sleep aid melatonin and aspirin.

In addition to Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis and Utah Senator Mike Lee have also tested positive for the coronavirus. White House aide Hope Hicks was the first to test positive for COVID-19 this week. All attended Saturday’s nomination ceremony for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more