Belarusian opposition politician Tsikhanouskaya wanted by Russia: interior ministry database

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Belarusian opposition politician Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya is listed as wanted by Russia in connection with a crime, according to a database of Russia’s interior ministry.

It was unclear when Tsikhanouskaya’s name was added to the database, but Russian media outlets first reported it on Wednesday.

Tsikhanouskaya fled to neighbouring Lithuania shortly after a disputed Aug. 9 election and has since met with European political leaders and called for President Alexander Lukashenko to leave power.

(Reporting by Anton Zverev and Gabrielle Tétrault-Farber; Writing by Alexander Marrow; Editing by Alison Williams)

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Opposition politician takes over Kyrgyzstan Interior …

BISHKEK, Oct 6 (Reuters) – Kyrgyz opposition politician and former senior security official Kursan Asanov has taken over as acting interior minister, a ministry spokesman said on Tuesday, indicating President Sooronbai Jeenbekov could be losing control over the country.

Police have been ordered to ensure citizens’ safety and prevent clashes and looting amid protests, the spokesman said, adding that incumbent Interior Minister Kashkar Junushaliyev has not shown up for work on Tuesday. (Reporting by Olga Dzyubenko; Writing by Olzhas Auyezov; Editing by Christian Schmollinger)

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Kyrgyzstan: Opposition politician takes over interior ministry, pres. ‘in control’

Kyrgyz opposition politician and former senior security official Kursan Asanov has taken over as acting interior minister, a ministry spokesman said on Tuesday, indicating President Sooronbai Jeenbekov could be losing control over the country.

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Police have been ordered to ensure citizens’ safety and prevent clashes and looting amid protests, the spokesman said, adding that incumbent Interior Minister Kashkar Junushaliyev has not shown up for work on Tuesday.

Kyrgyzstan’s pro-Russian president insisted he was in control of the country Tuesday despite protesters capturing the seat of government and freeing his predecessor and nemesis following violent clashes with police.

Sooronbay Jeenbekov’s office said in a statement that the president was “in control of the situation and expresses confidence that all political forces will put the interests of the country above their own.”

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Last Update: Tuesday, 06 October 2020 KSA 09:01 – GMT 06:01

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House GOP leaders rally opposition to Democrats’ scaled-down COVID bill

House Republicans are rallying members to oppose a new scaled-down coronavirus relief package from Democrats.

The GOP effort comes as negotiations between Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiAirline industry applauds Democrats for including aid in coronavirus relief package Democrats unveil scaled-down .2T coronavirus relief package Trump tax reveal roils presidential race MORE (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinDemocrats unveil scaled-down .2T coronavirus relief package Households, businesses fall into financial holes as COVID aid dries up Centrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote MORE showed signs of progress Tuesday on a COVID-19 aid bill after a weeks-long impasse.

Democrats unveiled their $2.2 trillion slimmed down proposal on Monday evening, which could come to the floor for a vote before the end of the week if a bipartisan agreement isn’t reached. The price tag is significantly lower than the $3.4 trillion HEROES Act passed by House Democrats in May.

But House GOP leaders on Tuesday rejected the new legislation.

“This bill recycles the same socialist wish list that was offered in the Heroes Act, which House Republicans overwhelmingly rejected,” House GOP Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseGinsburg becomes the first woman to lie in state in the Capitol House GOP slated to unveil agenda ahead of election House panel details ‘serious’ concerns around Florida, Georgia, Texas, Wisconsin elections MORE wrote in a memo sent to members urging a “no” vote on the legislation.

“Costing approximately $2.2 trillion, this is nothing more than a messaging exercise intended to appease the far-left base by included progressive policies that have nothing to do with the COVID-19 pandemic. Neither this bill nor anything like it will ever become law and Republicans should remain unified against this partisan power grab,” he added.

Congressional Republicans have expressed strong reservations about a number of provisions in the new bill from Democrats, including “subsidized Obamacare” for those receiving unemployment, the process in which the $600 a week in unemployment insurance would be extended, the potential for undocumented immigrants to receive stimulus payments and language calling for the release of certain federal prisoners.

The GOP memo noted that conservative outside groups — including Heritage Action, National Taxpayers Union, Americans for Prosperity, Americans for Tax Reform, Numbers USA, the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), Taxpayers Protection Alliance  and the Eagle Forum — have come out strongly against the Democratic measure.

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White House worried about Republican opposition to Trump controversial Fed pick

The White House is worried about opposition from Senate Republicans to Judy Shelton, President Trump’s nominee for a spot on the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors, according to people familiar with the matter.

“Her nomination is imperiled right now,” said Stephen Moore, an outside economic adviser to Trump.

“The White House is really not sure they have the 50 votes in the Senate to confirm her,” Moore told the Washington Examiner. Moore met with Trump and multiple senior White House officials on Wednesday.

Shelton is not expected to get support from any of the 47 senators who are Democrats or independents. Now, there are concerns that she does not have enough support from Republicans to garner the 51 votes necessary for confirmation.

Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the Republican whip, told reporters Tuesday that Shelton doesn’t have the votes needed for confirmation. Yet Trump’s National Economic Council director, Larry Kudlow, said Thursday at an event hosted by the Economic Club of New York that Trump remains firmly behind her nomination. Kudlow added that he thinks the White House can get the 50 Senate votes for her confirmation.

Republican Sens. Susan Collins, from Maine, and Mitt Romney from Utah said they would vote against her nomination in July. Moore said the White House is worried about other Republicans also voting against her, including Colorado’s Cory Gardner, who is up for reelection this year, and Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski.

Gardner and Murkowski did not respond to requests for comment.

An individual familiar with the matter said that Kudlow has been key in keeping Shelton’s nomination afloat.

“I was told she’s toast and the White House has to find somebody else to nominate,” a former senior administration official said. “But then, later in the day, she wasn’t toast anymore. Kudlow is her biggest supporter, and he will fight for her to the death.”

Shelton has generated opposition for her pointed criticisms of the Fed and her advocacy for a return to the gold standard as a monetary system.

In the past few months, her nomination faced several challenges after multiple Republicans and Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee indicated her views made her unsuitable for a seat on the Fed’s board of governors.

She has raised concerns on both sides of the aisle for her view that the Fed should have less power and independent discretion and instead have closer ties to the White House.

Nevertheless, the Senate Banking Committee narrowly approved her nomination in a 13-12 party-line vote in July. Her nomination has now moved on to the full Senate. Trump formally nominated Shelton to the post in January of this year.

Moore, who is also an Washington Examiner opinion columnist, said the new opposition to Shelton is due to Democrats putting pressure on Republicans such as Gardner and Murkowski.

“The Left is really out to get her. They don’t want any independent thinkers on the Fed who are going to challenge the way the empire does business,” Moore said.

He

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