SVA Interior Design Faculty Join NYCxDESIGN’s ‘Ode To NYC’ Poster Campaign

Jack Travis’ poster, We Keep From Goin’ Under, a reference to a lyric by Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five, the seminal South Bronx hip-hop group. “It was important to me to celebrate an iconic message expressing the love for my beloved city, created by one of the most beloved NYC designers, with another iconic message from my most beloved borough,” Travis says. “You cannot stop NYC. Love you, NYC, Miss you, Milton Glaser!”

 

NYCxDESIGN’s “Ode to NYC” posters are available for sale on Poster House’s website, with proceeds going to the Black Artists + Designers Guild (BADG), a nonprofit aimed at creating a more inclusive and equitable art and design world.

 

“The local designers we tapped have created poignant, inspiring posters that illustrate the resiliency, strength and rebirth of our beloved city,” says Valerie Hoffman, program director, NYCxDESIGN.

“As a collective of independent Black artists, makers and designers striving towards creating inclusive art and design environment through equity and representation, we are gratified and excited to be a part of this wonderful initiative, put forth by the efforts of so many talented New York-based creatives,” Malene Barnett, founder of BADG, says.

 

For more information on the “Ode to NYC” poster designers, locations and sale, go to NYCXDesign.

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Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew of ALFIE’S BAR & KITCHEN in Hell’s Kitchen, NYC

Chef Spotlight: Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew of ALFIE'S BAR & KITCHEN in Hell's Kitchen, NYC

Dublin-born chef Darren Pettigrew was trained in London at the Da Vere Grand Connaught Rooms and grew up working in the kitchens of New York. Throughout his career he has donned the stove at countless established restaurants in New York honing his skills in the kitchen and continually pushing the envelope with more creative takes on everyday dishes. He previously owned seafood restaurant Stella Maris at the South Street Seaport for five years. He also spent a number of years working with famed restaurateurs Peter and Harry Poulakakos at their Financial District properties. Now he serves as the Executive Chef for the SRP NYC restaurant group, developing innovative menus for their various concepts.

Alfie’s Bar & Kitchen, the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood favorite that just celebrated its eight-year anniversary, spotlights a brand-new and refreshed New American Gastro Pub menu from new Executive Chef Darren Pettigrew. The restaurant is owned by seasoned restaurateur, Sean Hayden, whose career spans 25 years and serves as a partner of the SRP NYC restaurant group that operates Valerie, Dalton’s, and Jasper’s Tap House & Kitchen. Hayden saw a need to create a true restaurant experience for the community and was the first to bring a more sophisticated American kitchen to the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood. Now Chef Pettigrew will be providing Alfie’s beloved customers with an inspired dining experience complete with elevated New American dishes, spotlighting locally sourced organic ingredients.

Broadwayworld.com had the pleasure on interviewing Chef Pettigrew about his career and Alfie’s Bar & Kitchen for our “Chef Spotlight.”

What was your earliest interest in cooking?

My earliest interest in cooking was making apple pies as a kid with my mother. Playing with dough made with lard and helping to peel Irish crab apples. The native crab apple grows wildly amongst the wild hedge rows and woodlands of Ireland. Probably the most bitter fruit I’ve ever tasted but makes for a great pie!

Who were some of your career mentors?

I’ve been very fortunate to have had many real mentors and talented people to help guide me throughout my career. Starting with Chef Cormac Healy at the National Yacht Club of Ireland. Chef Eric Lind; Chef Ebhenhart Mullers my left hand man, formerly of Lutece. Most recently, Master Chef Rich Rosendale.

What culinary styles have influenced your career?

I’m classically trained, so certainly French, Italian and Spanish, but a recent trip to Japan has turned the way I think about food on its head. Japanese food is very simplistic and pure in essence, but extraordinarily difficult to execute. I trained with a great group of Japanese chefs in rural Japan at the dream lab. Their dedication, technique and precision was something to be admired.

What do you consider the most distinguishing feature of your work as a chef?

Reforming totally new teams, learning to be more resilient and understanding how to constantly adapt to a forever changing landscape. In addition to learn how to handle all the other curve balls being thrown at us week in

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Two NYC Artists in Their Once-Bohemian Village Garden

Painters Pat Steir, 80, and Francesco Clemente, 68, have been neighbors for three decades and friends for even longer. They’re from a generation of artists who came into their own during the 1970s and 1980s and settled in then-raffish parts of town which have since become almost unbearably polished. Steir, who once wryly told the New York Times that she’d been “forgotten and rediscovered many times,” has a new documentary about her life and work. Clemente has had a steady and successful career. They live across from one another at the MacDougal-Sullivan Gardens, a courtyard in Greenwich Village that you can only access from the townhouses surrounding it. Inside, you’ll find a stone path looping around a lawn and very tall trees.

“When we moved in there in 1990, I sort of elbowed my way into controlling the garden,” Steir says. “So I planted, with the help of two other neighbors, shrubs and grass and we made it what we thought was beautiful.”

It’s one of those old New York spaces that seem like they should’ve disappeared years ago, and in some ways it already has. Condos are now adjacent to the historic townhouses (a few years ago, Anna Wintour, another famous resident of the Gardens, railed against them at a community board meeting) and the area has steadily changed from a Beat-era enclave — Bob Dylan and Alexander Calder were residents — into something much less bohemian.

As new residents have moved in, the fences around the private gardens have grown taller, and the plants more cookie cutter. Some residents hired professional landscapers and gardeners. Things became more “normal” looking, as Steir describes.

“They wanted privets, I wanted flowering shrubs,” she says. “I’m in a constant battle with the new tenants. I had to ward off people who wanted to plant fake grass. And I said, ‘No! It will kill your children. It will off-gas!’ They thought I was an old coot.”

Painter Francesco Clemente’s watercolor, titled 5-8-2020, is part of an exhibition at Lévy Gorvy, which includes over three decades of his work. Clemente works across many different mediums, and watercolor is one he returns to time and again because of his itinerant lifestyle.
Farzad Owrang; courtesy Lévy Gorvy

Meanwhile, life has become much quieter. The annual May Day dinner parties, which were once organized by Alexander Calder’s late daughter Mary, no longer take place. Clemente and his wife Alba, a costume designer, raised their family in the garden and recall days when all of the kids would just run around playing together. But now children aren’t as common.

The strangeness of this summer struck some residents as familiar: “When the pandemic started, all of a sudden Soho was all boarded up and looked exactly as it did when I moved to New York 50 years ago,” Clemente says. “So for me it was not a shock; it was a sense of tenderness and ‘oh the past is coming back.’ Now it’s not like that. But you

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De Blasio says Madison Square Garden, other NYC sports venues should pay more taxes

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that he supports calls to compel the owners of local sports stadiums, including Madison Square Garden and Yankee Stadium, to pay more taxes to aid the city’s bid to bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic.

De Blasio, a Democrat, was asked at his daily press briefing to respond to a letter last month from nine lawmakers on the New York City Council who called for the Garden, Yankee Stadium, the Barclays Center and Citi Field to pay property taxes. The mayor said he hasn’t seen the letter and was unfamiliar with the legal specifics, but supported the concept of requiring New York’s local teams to increase their contributions.

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“Let’s be clear – sports franchises have gained incredible value over the years,” de Blasio said. “They clearly have the resources. I think the history in this city and pretty much all over the country was stadium deals were not good deals for the public, by and large. Some of the more recent ones have been better, but mostly they haven’t been that good. Everything should be reevaluated especially at a point when the city is going to need resources for our recovery.”

Representatives for Madison Square Garden and Yankee Stadium could not immediately be reached for comment on de Blasio’s remarks.

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The letter from the New York City councilmembers included a specific call to end a tax break that has exempted Madison Square Garden from paying taxes since 1982. The lawmakers also want the city to renegotiate their Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) agreements with Yankee Stadium and other local venues to increase investments in their surrounding communities.

De Blasio said he also supports a local call to require the New York Yankees to pay fair market rent for their stadium to establish parity with local businesses. He called on the franchise to step up its efforts to support the Bronx during the pandemic.

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“Of course, they should support the neighborhood right around them. And that’s a neighborhood, you’re right, that has gone through a lot over the years and deserves that support,” de Blasio said in response to a question at the briefing. “The Yankees should be good neighbors, reach out to those businesses, see how they can provide them financial support in this tough time.”

De Blasio has faced criticism in recent days for his handling of the pandemic. A group of more than 160 local business leaders, including executives from Citigroup, Jet Blue and Con Edison, called last week for de Blasio to address “quality of life” issues that arose in New York City in recent months, including public safety and cleanliness.

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MSG, other NYC sports venues should pay more taxes

Madison Square Garden and other local sports stadiums and arenas should pay more taxes to help the city through its COVID-19 recovery, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday.

“I can say as a question of right and wrong what they’re saying is the right direction,” de Blasio commented at a City Hall press briefing when asked by a reporter about a recent letter from council members calling for the state legislature to repeal at 1982 tax break on the Garden.

The nine local lawmakers, led by Queens Democrat Costa Constantinides, also want the city to renegotiate payments from Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, Citi Field in Queens and the Barclay’s Center in Brooklyn.

“Back when I was public advocate I was talking about the fact that Madison Square Garden should be paying more in taxes,” said de Blasio, speaking of the position he held from 2010 through 2013 before becoming mayor.

“I think the history in this city and pretty much all over the country was stadium deals were not good deals for the public by and large some of the more recent ones have been better, but mostly they haven’t been that good and everything should be re-evaluated especially at a point where the city’s going to need resources for our recovery,” de Blasio said.

“So I think it’s time to look at all of that,” he added.

Both Constantinides and state Sen. Brad Hoylman applauded the mayor’s remarks.

“It’s great to hear the Mayor is open to having our arenas finally do their part and I hope he’ll engage with them about this,” Constantinides told The Post.

“If the Rangers can pay Artemi Panarin $81 million over seven years, they can surely help make sure we still have subways that get fans to the Garden to see him play,” he said.

“Yes lets pass @BrianKavanaghNY’s bill to repeal Madison Square Garden’s tax breaks and use that money to pay for schools and rent relief,” Hoylman tweeted Monday about legislation authored by his fellow Democratic state senator Brian Kavanagh. 

De Blasio was also asked about a second recent letter from Cary Goodman, head of the local Business Improvement District near Yankee Stadium. Goodman asked de Blasio to renegotiate a sweetheart lease granted by former Mayor Michael Bloomberg that charges just $1 per year for rent on public land.

Goodman proposed requiring the Yankees to pay the same as local businesses — between $60 to $120 per square foot or $100 million a year for the stadium’s 1.3 million square feet.

The area mom and pop shops are struggling to survive without fans attending games, Goodman said.

“We all hope and pray that next year baseball will resume in person at some point in the year and the fans will come back and the businesses will thrive, but of course the Yankees should help them through and I assure you they have the money,” de Blasio said.

Reps for MSG and the Yankees did not immediately respond to requests for

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NYC kidnapping: NYPD search for man, 3-year-old after abduction at McCaffrey playground in Hell’s Kitchen

HELL’S KITCHEN, Manhattan (WABC) — Police are searching for the man they believe kidnapped a 3-year-old boy.

The NYPD believe the suspect Dale Smith got into a verbal argument with his ex-girlfriend at the McCaffrey Playground located at 9th Avenue and West 43rd Street in Hell’s Kitchen on Thursday.

He ended up leaving with her 3-year-old son Majesty Brown without her permission.

The kidnapped child is described as Black, 3’5″ tall, 45 pounds, with a medium complexion, brown eye and black hair braided in corn rows. He was last seen wearing a gray t-shirt with orange lettering, black jeans, yellow sneakers with “700” written on the sides.

Smith is described as a 20-year-old Black male, 5’8″ tall, with a light complexion, brown eyes, and black hair in braids. He has a tattoo that says “DALE” on his left arm and a tattoo that says “LOYALTY” on his right arm. Smith was last seen wearing a black baseball hat, white shirt, gray jeans and gray sneakers.

Smith is not the child’s biological father.

Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the CrimeStoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM, or on Twitter @ NYPDTips.

ALSO READ: NY to begin sending extra $300 per week in unemployment benefits to 2 million-plus New Yorkers

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