Designers reimagine New England ski house decor to create a modern ‘man cave’ up north

Josh E. Linder and Thomas Henry Egan III liken reaching Rangeley, Maine, to a trek to the North Pole. The designers, principals of Boston-based Evolve Residential, drove up in Linder’s hybrid right before the pandemic to install the finishing touches on a client’s new home. “It was a long, slow ascent up a mountain on black ice with fresh powder on top,” Linder said. “We didn’t see any other cars, just a tractor carrying logs barreling at us.”



a living room filled with furniture and a fireplace: evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom


© Sean Litchfield
evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom

It turns out there is a less precarious route; reassuring given the region gets an annual snowfall of 200-plus inches. Linder and Egan’s clients, a Cambridge family of five, purchased the four-bedroom home last year, primarily to take advantage of the snowmobiling trails that crisscross the area, which also boasts a series of lakes. “The views are showstopping,” Egan said. “There are towering pines, and everything is covered in snow.”

The house, however, was nothing special. Although nestled in the trees on a hill, the structure itself was essentially charmless. “It was a 1980s developer house in the most pristine natural setting,” Linder said. The first step was to remove the unsightly pressure-treated wood deck, which wrapped from front to back. To replace it, Egan designed a wide, covered front porch inspired by the Adirondack-style cottages that dot the area. “It needed a defining architectural feature,” he explained. “Now it looks homey and warm.”

The revamped façade, now stylish and welcoming, set the tone for the interior scheme. While the whole family convenes here from time to time, the husband, teenage sons, and their friends visit most often. The directive was that the rooms feel relaxed. The décor was not to echo that of the stylish summer home the firm designed for the family on Massachusetts’ South Coast. “We had to reinvent the concept of a ‘man cave,’ ” Egan said.

The question became how to infuse their signature vibrancy into spaces that felt laid back and approachable. “It had to be tamer overall — less colorful and not too primped,” Linder said. The solution was to embrace the color blue and lean into natural materials, including fir, birch, leather, and jute. “Navy can go in many directions, but at the end of the day, it’s a masculine color,” Egan said. “The house had to be comfortable for men from the moment they entered.”

Knowing everyone would enter from the side door, the designers turned the mudroom area into a cozy place to hang out. Two George Smith chairs that came from the wife’s parents are at the ready in front of a cast-iron wood stove against a new stacked-granite wall. The storage — baskets and hooks and a live-edge wood bench — happens behind them. “You can relax on the chairs while you warm your feet; it’s not just a repository for wet clothing and shoes,” Egan said.

In addition to dressing up the space with local stone and woodwork painted Benjamin Moore’s “Hale Navy,” the designers

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Kitchen fire burns apartment building on Syracuse’s North Side

Syracuse, N.Y. — Residents of a North Side apartment building escaped injury after a fire this afternoon in a first-floor apartment.



a group of people on a boat in the water: Firefighters on the scene of a fire at 100 Pond Street on Syracuse's North Side. Sept. 29, 2020.


© Jacob Pucci | [email protected]/Jacob Pucci/syracuse.com/TNS
Firefighters on the scene of a fire at 100 Pond Street on Syracuse’s North Side. Sept. 29, 2020.

Firefighters were called to 100 Pond Street around 12:32 p.m. after a passerby saw smoke coming from the building.

When firefighters arrived, they found an active fire in the kitchen of a downstairs apartment—one of five units in the building, Syracuse Deputy Fire Chief Bob Cussen said.

Four children were in the apartment at the time, but all made it outside safely.

Around 15 people lived in the building, Cussen said. No injuries were reported.

The fire was largely contained to the one apartment, Cussen said, but the first and second floors both sustained smoke damage. Cussen said he believes the building had working smoke detectors at the time of the fire.

It took firefighters around 15 minutes to extinguish the flames.

The exact cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Contact Jacob Pucci at [email protected] or find him on Twitter at @JacobPucci.

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Minister doesn’t know whether it’s legal to meet a friend in a pub garden in locked down North East England

A MINISTER caused confusion this morning after she was unable to say if new laws banning people from meeting friends from different households would apply outside.

In a chaotic interview today Gillian Keegan said she didn’t know whether people were still allowed to meet up with others outside from tomorrow, when the locked down North East faces an even tougher crackdown.

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Gillian Keegan today couldn't confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

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Gillian Keegan today couldn’t confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

Parts of the North East of England including Sunderland, Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland will be outlawed from popping around to visit a friend for a cup of tea, or seeing their parents for lunch out in any public setting, Matt Hancock said yesterday.

As The Sun exclusively revealed, it means they will face fines for breaking the rules, and possibly get a criminal record.

But Ms Keegan was today unable to say whether friends could meet up in a pub garden, or other outdoor settings such as a park.

She told Radio 4’s Today programme: “Sorry I can’t answer that question, I don’t represent the North East… I didn’t want to make a mistake”.

The Chicester MP said: “I’m sorry, I can’t clarify that.

“I just don’t have the details of those seven areas.”

The Department of Health confirmed to The Sun today that people will only face fines if they meet with others in indoor settings.

The North East’s guidance says that people should not socialise with people they don’t live with in any public space – meaning pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops or elsewhere.

The household mixing rules will be put into law as of 00.01 tomorrow.

The level of fines is not yet clear.

 

People in the North East will be fined for visiting others in their own homes, Matt Hancock reveals

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How a little garden north of Seattle brought an island’s community together

Hat Island is a tiny island with a yearlong population of about 60 – and when COVID-19 was getting them down, they came together to create something amazing.

HAT ISLAND, Wash. — Hat Island is a tiny island about seven miles on the water from Everett. It’s a private island that feels worlds away, with about sixty yearlong residents. That feeling is magnified in our current, quarantined world – Hat Island has closed off to most visitors, making it even more distant than before. And the residents were starting to feel that.

“People were getting a little testy from the COVID isolation, and this gave people an outlet to get something done,” says Hat Island resident John Holte.

Thus, the Hat Island Volunteer Garden was born. A group of residents dreamed up the garden as a way to pull the community together and grow something for the island – literally. 

“It gave the community a beautiful focus to have a shared goal to see developing month after month,” says Merry Shropshire, one of the garden’s founders.

“Its’ just been a healing, growing thing I think everybody needed,” says Lori Christopher, another garden founder.

Pretty much everything about the garden, from the realistic dock to the driftwood signposts to the colorful sign, painted by Lori, was either donated, self-funded, or made by volunteers. 

While you can’t visit the Hat Island garden unless you live on Hat Island, you can help them continue their efforts to grow. In order to support the garden, volunteers sell tee-shirts, tote bags and their very own wine label online! Just email [email protected] to find out more.

The garden is truly a community effort. Even the plant sprouts were hand-grown by residents.

“Broccoli, cabbage, kale, beets, onions, all these starts began in their windowsills and under grow lights in their homes,” Shropshire says. “So it makes it especially wonderful that all of the fruits and vegetables you see were grown by islanders.”

Volunteers are the backbone of the garden. Residents sign up to water, weed and harvest every week.

“We have watering twice a day, and we have a list that’s always filled up with people willing to help,” Christopher says.

And when harvest day comes around every Saturday, those same dedicated volunteers collect and distribute the fruits and vegetables. It’s a bounty born from a strange, scary time, but the residents of Hat Island plan to continue growing and growing.

“It’s a place that we want to do the very best we can for,” says Christopher.

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What happens in North Carolina has ramifications for control of the White House, Senate and Supreme Court

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — By Sunday morning, less than two days after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the signs were already stapled to telephone poles in this liberal college town. “VOTE!” they read, above an Uncle Sam-style image of the iconic feminist jurist.

Not that voters here needed a reminder of the stakes in this election.

North Carolina, where the changing demographics reflect America as much as the urban-rural divisions mirror its polarization, was already a crucial bellwether. The state is critical to President Trump’s re-election bid, particularly as he has slipped in the industrial Midwest and come under more pressure to retain the rest of his 2016 map.

With competitive races for president, Senate and governor and control of the State Legislature up for grabs, voters are being deluged by advertisements: More money has been spent on television commercials here than in any other state.

And now, Justice Ginsburg’s death has made North Carolina even more important. If Mr. Trump and Senate Republicans try to hastily push through a new justice before or immediately after the election, it could doom three senators in states where they were already trailing, and where Joseph R. Biden Jr. appears well-positioned: Maine, Colorado and Arizona.

That makes North Carolina not just a bellwether but a linchpin, with the fate of Senator Thom Tillis’s re-election campaign a key factor in deciding which party will control the Senate. And Mr. Tillis’s early pronouncement that he would support whomever the president selects to replace Justice Ginsburg underscored the way the future of the White House, the Senate and the Supreme Court have all become entwined with North Carolina politics.

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The White House, Senate and Supreme Court Could All Hinge on North Carolina

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — By Sunday morning, less than two days after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the signs were already stapled to telephone poles in this liberal college town. “VOTE!” they read, above an Uncle Sam-style image of the iconic feminist jurist.

Not that voters here needed a reminder of the stakes in this election.

North Carolina, where the changing demography reflects America as much as the urban-rural divisions mirror its polarization, was already a crucial bellwether. The state is critical to President Trump’s re-election, particularly as he has slipped in the industrial Midwest and come under more pressure to retain the rest of his 2016 map.

With competitive races for president, Senate and governor and control of the State Legislature up for grabs, voters are being deluged by advertisements: More money has been spent on television commercials here than in any other state.

And now, Justice Ginsburg’s death has made North Carolina even more important this year. If Mr. Trump and Senate Republicans try to hastily push through a new justice before or immediately after the election, it could doom three senators in states where they were already trailing, and where Joseph R. Biden Jr. appears well-positioned: Maine, Colorado and Arizona.

That makes North Carolina not just a bellwether but a linchpin, with Senator Thom Tillis holding perhaps the deciding seat in who controls the Senate. The White House, the Senate and the Supreme Court, then, could hang in the balance here.

“We have more of an ability to shape the future of the state, nation and world than anybody else,” said Josh Stein, the state’s Democratic attorney general who is also on the ballot and has used that line to rally supporters at drive-in church services and other Covid-era gatherings.

It is not just Democrats who see the looming Supreme Court battle as an opportunity to rouse their supporters.

“No one believes we can keep a Senate majority unless we win North Carolina,” Mr. Tillis said on Saturday at a rally with Mr. Trump in Fayetteville, N.C., shortly before the president took the podium and announced his plans to pick a female justice as early as this week.

“The president has the responsibility and the authority to nominate a justice,” said Mr. Tillis, before citing the list of potential Supreme Court justices Mr. Trump released earlier in the month. “He’s going to nominate one of those justices, and I’m going to vote for their confirmation.”

Mr. Tillis is calculating that the president will win North Carolina again, and that the court

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North and interior parts of the State to experience thunderstorms for two days

Rainfall activity may remain largely subdued over the State except for pockets in north and interior parts of the Tamil Nadu till the weekend.

The east-west shear zone over the Andhra Pradesh region and convective activity will bring only isolated rainfall for the next two or three days, noted meteorologists. Besides northern districts, one or two places such as Salem, Erode, Nilgiris and Ariyalur would get light to moderate rainfall.

Officials of the Meteorological department said light rains are likely in some districts such as Theni, Dindigul, Sivagangai, Pudukottai and Ramanathapuram till Saturday.

S.Balachandran, Deputy Director General of Meteorology, Chennai, said there may not be much intense rainfall over the State for the next few days. The east west shear zone would be the main weather phenomenon to influence thunderstorms over the State.

Thunderstorms may continue in some places of Chennai too particularly during evening or night hours, which is typical in September, he said.

On the low pressure likely to develop over the Bay of Bengal around September 20, he said the system is being monitored and it may not have much impact on the State.

During the past 24 hours ending 8.30 a.m. on Thursday, nine rain gauges in various districts, including Pandalur taluk office (Nilgiris district), Namakkal district, Alandur, Meenambakkam and Chembarambakkam near Chennai received the day’s highest quantity of 2 cm of rainfall.

While the other reservoirs except the one in Chembarambakkam did not receive any rainfall, officials of the Water Resources Department noted that Krishna water from Kandaleru reservoir in Andhra Pradesh would be released on Friday for Chennai’s requirement.

The Meteorological Department forecasts a generally cloudy sky and light rains in some areas till Saturday in Chennai. The city is likely to record a maximum temperature of 33 degree Celsius for two days.

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North Carolina poll shows close races for White House, Senate

Biden notched a 3-point lead in a CNN/SRSS poll published Tuesday, a 2-point lead in a Monmouth University poll published Sept. 3, and a 4-point lead in a Fox News poll published Sept. 2.

According to a RealClearPolitics average of North Carolina surveys conducted from Aug. 29-Sept. 14, Biden remains 0.9 percentage points ahead of Trump in general election polling.

Trump won North Carolina’s 15 Electoral College votes by 3.8 percentage points in 2016. The state has flipped between backing Democratic and Republican presidential candidates in previous election cycles.

Former President Barack Obama carried North Carolina in 2008, but lost there in 2012 to former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

The latest Suffolk University/USA Today survey also shows Democratic Senate candidate Cal Cunningham with a narrow edge over Republican incumbent Sen. Thom Tillis.

The closely watched race is one of a handful in which endangered Senate Republicans are battling for reelection, and it could decide whether the GOP maintains control of the chamber.

Cunningham leads Tillis by 4 percentage points among likely voters, 42-38 percent.

The RealClearPolitics average of polling for the North Carolina Senate race, which includes surveys from Aug. 29-Sept. 14, shows Cunningham ahead of Tillis by 3.5 percentage points.

Tillis is widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable Senate Republicans competing for another term in November, along with Maine’s Susan Collins, Colorado’s Cory Gardner and Arizona’s Martha McSally.

The Suffolk University/USA Today poll was conducted Sept. 11-14, surveying 500 likely voters in North Carolina.

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Vegetables From North GA’s Garden Feed Lumpkin County Students

DAHLONEGA, GA — As school nutrition director at Lumpkin County Schools, Julie Knight-Brown learned some surprising news about elementary school children.

“The little kids love radishes,” Knight-Brown said. “One of the parents thanked the café manager at Long Branch Elementary for introducing her children to radishes. She said, ‘They loved them.'”

Fresh radishes, tomatoes, onions, and an assortment of herbs were a few items the University of North Georgia supplied the school system this summer and into the fall. The vegetables and herbs were grown and harvested from the gardens at the Vickery House and Appalachian Studies Center on University of North Georgia’s Dahlonega Campus. The fresh produce was delivered to Lumpkin County Schools and has been integrated into school lunches.

“We started in July and harvested on a weekly basis,” said David Patterson, associate professor of biology who spearheaded the project.

Knight-Brown said some produce such as cherry tomatoes and radishes have been a “featured” vegetable at a school or offered as a side dish in the cafeteria. Other items such as onions were incorporated into other meals while herbs were used for their flavor.

A portion of the summer produce was frozen for future use, which helped the school’s finances this academic year. Knight-Brown explained the school nutrition program’s budget has suffered because of the COVID-19 pandemic. She said the donations from the University of North Georgia’s gardens happened at an optimal time.

“All school nutrition programs are facing the same financial dilemma,” Knight-Brown said. “We will happily take any donated fresh produce.”

Lumpkin County Schools is not the only beneficiary of the Hometown Harvest program. University of North Georgia students in need of service-learning hours can get their hands dirty in the gardens. Patterson said between five and 10 students helped harvest the produce this summer.

Two more students, Amelia Arthur and Zach Pilgrim, have been involved in a precision agriculture research project funded by University of North Georgia’s Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities. The primary objective was to test the impact of a precision agriculture system in small-scale gardens as a means for increasing food production for students in need.

“They took the garden from seed to production,” Patterson said. “They also collected the data, which we are analyzing now.”

In the meantime, the gardens have been turned to produce fall vegetables for Lumpkin County Schools. Leafy greens and broccoli seeds have been sown. The only missing element this fall is more volunteers.

“The gardens at the Vickery House have always been viewed as an heirloom garden,” Patterson said. “But now we have determined how to integrate consistent food production with seed-saving techniques. Now we need more University of North Georgia and community involvement.”

He said some volunteer opportunities could be as simple as watering the garden or turning over the compost. Pulling weeds may take a little more effort and knowledge, Patterson said.

“Some students may have trouble knowing the difference between an onion stem and a weed, but we are there to

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Alma Cocina Latina moves to Station North, will share space with Mera Kitchen Collective

Venezuelan eatery Alma Cocina Latina has announced it’s found a new home in Station North.



Irena Stein et al. posing for a picture: Emily Lerman, left, founder of the Mera Kitchen Collective, and Irena Stein, owner of Alma Cocina Latina, will share a cooking space in Station North.


© Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Emily Lerman, left, founder of the Mera Kitchen Collective, and Irena Stein, owner of Alma Cocina Latina, will share a cooking space in Station North.

The restaurant, which shuttered its location in Canton’s Can Company late last month, is set to reopen at 1701 N. Charles St. in mid- to late October. The 5,300-square-foot space was formerly occupied by the Pen & Quill, which closed in July. The restaurant will join a block occupied by the Charles Theatre and Orto, among various other businesses.

Alma Cocina Latina will share the space with Mera Kitchen Collective, the Baltimore group founded by former aid worker Emily Lerman. The two businesses had previously collaborated to prepare meals for World Central Kitchen, the food relief organization founded by celebrity chef José Andrés.

Through their newly formed partnership, Alkimiah, Alma Cocina Latina and Mera Kitchen Collective plan to continue to prepare free meals for community members through a combination of grants and donations, said Alma Cocina Latina owner Irena Stein.

“In this location we can do a lot more meals, and that’s wonderful,” said Stein. The atmosphere will remain consistent with the tropical, airy vibe of the Canton location, said Stein, and the menu under new executive chef David Zamudio will keep its trademark arepas and small plates.

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