Exclusive: White House Moves Forward on Two More Arms Sales to Taiwan – Sources | World News

By Mike Stone, Patricia Zengerle and David Brunnstrom

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House is moving forward with more sales of sophisticated military equipment to Taiwan, telling Congress on Tuesday that it will seek to sell MQ-9 drones and a coastal defensive missile system, five sources familiar with the situation said.

The possible sales, which are likely to anger China in the run-up to the Nov. 3 U.S. election, follows three notifications first reported by Reuters on Monday.

China considers Taiwan a wayward province that it has vowed to reunite with the mainland, by force if necessary.

Reuters broke the news in September that as many as seven major weapons systems were making their way through the U.S. export process as the Trump administration ramps up pressure on China.

The pre-notification to Congress for the MQ-9 drone case is the first after President Donald Trump’s administration moved ahead with its plan to sell more drones to more countries by reinterpreting an international arms control agreement called the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR).

The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations and House of Representatives Foreign Affairs committees have the right to review, and block, weapons sales under an informal review process before the State Department sends its formal notification to the legislative branch.

(Reporting by Mike Stone, Patricia Zengerle and David Brunnstrom in Washington; Additional reporting by Matt Spetalnick in Washington; Editing by Matthew Lewis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Brookshire brings community kitchen to Acadiana to help feed those affected by Hurricane Delta | News

Brookshire Grocery Co., the company that owns Super 1 Foods, is deploying a community kitchen and a team of employee-partners to serve free hot meals to people who have been affected by Hurricane Delta in Acadiana, according to a statement from the company.

Starting Sunday, a team will serve sausage biscuits for breakfast and hamburgers and hotdogs for lunch and dinner in the Super 1 Foods parking lots listed below, while supplies last at each location.

Sunday

11:30 a.m. — 215 W. Willow St. in Lafayette

5 p.m. — 924 Rees St. in Breaux Bridge

Monday

8 a.m. — 939 S. Lewis St. in New Iberia

11:30 a.m. — 939 S. Lewis St. in New Iberia

5 p.m. — 2210 Veterans Memorial Drive in Abbeville

Tuesday 

11:30 a.m. — 1800 W. Laurel St. in Eunice

5 p.m. — 2418 S. Union St. in Opelousas

Wednesday

8 a.m. — 2418 S. Union St. in Opelousas

Despite widespread damage and outages, a sigh of relief that Delta wasn’t worse in Acadiana

Hundreds of thousands still without power in Louisiana, more than 20k in East Baton Rouge

Lafayette, Vermilion school districts opt to cancel school early next week after Hurricane Delta damage

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CapFed Best News: Jong’s Thai Kitchen opens with customers’ needs in mind – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

Banjong Jongthep has always dreamed of owning her own restaurant. After working at Tuptim Thai and co-owning A-Hann Thai, she has branched out and decided to run her own kitchen.

JongThep, along with co-owners Nimm and Derek Ragsdale, has opened Jong’s Thai Kitchen at 800 S.W. 12th St. Many will recognize the Thai restaurant’s new home as the former location of Cafe Holliday and, for a short time after that, La Casita Cafe.

While small inside, the restaurant offers customers a warm and inviting feel. Large windows at the front of the restaurant are framed by trees and offer a nice view of the park located across the street.

The restaurant, which opened Sept. 21, specializes in Thai dishes that are handcrafted by Jongthep herself.

Jong’s Thai Kitchen is open 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 8 p.m. Saturday. Reservations are strongly encouraged.

The dishes are packed with flavor and Jongthep will cater to her customers’ needs. If someone comes in and wants an item that isn’t on the menu and she has time, she will cook it.

“A lot of people say, ’Banjong, I don’t know what to eat or what I want.’ I say, ’OK,’ ” Jongthep said. “I want you to come here and get what you want and make you happy.”

Her ultimate goal is to make sure her customers leave happy and serve them unique and fresh food.

The menu items are meals that the three owners like to eat and Jongthep has adapted them.

Melissa’s Chicken is stir-fried chicken breast marinated in a house seasoning with a touch of white rum, bell pepper, mushrooms, onion and basil in a brown sauce.

Ross’ Curry is made with a Thai red curry paste, coconut milk, bell pepper, Thai egg plant, bamboo shoot, peppercorn, krachai and Sriracha.

Linda’s Sweet Chili Noodle, which has been named after Derek Ragsdale’s mother, is pan-fried noodles with egg, mushrooms, onion and bell pepper with a Thai sweet chili sauce and Sriracha.

Derek Ragsdale said that since opening, business has been good.

“The community is really supportive and we’ve got people that kind of follow Jong’s cooking,” Derek Ragsdale said. “Family and friends definitely come in a lot.”

While Jongthep is excited to see her dream become reality, it makes her happier to see others enjoying her food.

Nimm Ragsdale said it also makes them happy when customers return after their first visit.

“I’m happy if you like my food. When the customers clean up their food, that’s when I’m happy,” she said.

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Midtown-Hell’s Kitchen, NY Coronavirus Updates & News For October 10



Upper East Side, NY |
17h

Covid Patient Meets His Plasma Donor | Art Week Underway | VP Debate Lights Up Building | Hospital Marks 1,000th Birth

UES Race Turns Turbulent | Upper East Side Week In Review
(Nick Garber/Patch / Liz Fine / NewYork-Presbyterian / Campaigns of Patrick Bobilin, Rebecca Seawright, Lou Puliafito)

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — Miss any headlines on the Upper East Side this week? Patch’s week in review has you covered for the neighborhood’s top news…. Read more



New York City, NY |
17h

Closures Hit COVID-19 Hotspots | Schools Shuttered | Students Choose Remote Learning | Murders Hit High

NEW YORK CITY — Here’s a roundup of the top citywide headlines from New York City this week…. Read more



New York City, NY |
18h

As the U.S. still reels from the pandemic’s economic fallout, the state’s billionaires all vastly increased their wealth, Forbes found.

NEW YORK – Everyday New Yorkers might be struggling from record unemployment or fearing for the future of their jobs as the coronavirus continues to ravage the country, but the city’s billionaires are doing just fine…. Read more



New York City, NY |
19h

Social distancing actions largely stopped and warnings to noncompliant businesses dropped in September, 311 data shows.

NEW YORK CITY — Flare ups of coronavirus cases in Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods followed weeks of declining enforcement actions by city agencies, 311 data shows.But complaints over social distancing and reopening businesses breaking safety measures fell as well, indicating New Yorkers as a whole grew more lax and less vigilant when it came to the virus.The dips in enforcement and watchfulness started in August and continued… Read more



New York City, NY |
20h

First responders and essential workers have been putting their lives on the line during the coronavirus pandemic.

From CBS New York:

October 8 2020

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — First responders and essential workers have been putting their lives on the line during the coronavirus pandemic.

But now, some of them are getting recognition.

Read more at CBS New York Read more



New York City, NY |
17h

The positivity rate in “red zones” in Brooklyn, Queens and elsewhere in the state stands at 6.6 percent, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

NEW YORK CITY — Increased focus on coronavirus clusters in Brooklyn and Queens hasn’t yet yielded a decline in cases, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said…. Read more



Park Slope, NY |
19h

The Diocese and several Jewish organizations contend the state violated their First Amendment rights with coronavirus hotspot restrictions.

NEW YORK, NY — The Brooklyn Diocese and several Jewish organizations have taken their fight against renewed coronavirus restrictions in New York city hotspots to the courts. … Read more



New York City, NY |
23h

For your coronavirus stress baking, head to a pumpkin patch near NYC and make a perfect from-scratch pumpkin pie.

NEW YORK CITY – The past several months have kindled new interest in baking as Americans spend more time hunkering down at home to avoid the coronavirus. Buying a pumpkin for a

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At Home: Dorm decor pairs space savers, personal style – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

Washburn University freshman and art education major Ella Prengel may have moved away from home and into the dorms this fall, but she took pieces of home with her and incorporated them into her dorm décor.

“When I was deciding how I was going to decorate my dorm room, I definitely thought about how my room was at home, so I have a lot of my art stuff, pictures of my friends and stuff that reminds me of home,” she said.

Prengel lives in a suite, which consists of two sleeping spaces that house two students each, with an adjoining shared bathroom, a configuration that many universities are adopting as they remodel dormitories built in the 1950s and 1960s to meet the needs of modern students.

After being quarantined for the first two weeks of the school year, Prengel said she and her suitemates were eager to get settled into their new space and decorate.

“Decorating was about reflecting my personality — bright colors, butterflies on the ceiling,” she said. “I want my side of my room to be something I can go back to and feel comfortable in.”

Prengel isn’t alone in her desire to create a space that feels like home away from home. Dorm design, furniture and accessories are big business for retailers each August, and new trends emerge every year for the hottest items in dorm living. 2020 is no exception.

Textures in pillows, rugs and bedding are very popular this year. Shag and fur pillows adorn extra-long twin beds, and velvet has made a comeback in the college scene in the form of comforters and curtains.

On the color front, ombre gradients and retro mini-appliances like microwaves and refrigerators in bright colors saw a surge in sales, along with the industrial look popping up in student desks, chairs and lamps made with industrial pipe and pipe fittings.

Succulents, both real and faux, are making appearances in textile designs and artwork but also provide an easy-care option for students who want to bring a little nature indoors.

By far, the biggest dorm design trend of 2020 has been the boho chic movement, which incorporates natural elements, colors, patterns and textures. Macramé is back in a big way, and not just to hold plants. The distinctive texture is being used in comforters and pillows. Wicker, fur, feathers and live edge furniture like desks and end tables are showing up on campuses across the country.

Because of the space limitations and other challenges that dorm design brings, it can be easy to become overwhelmed with the choices available, but the truth is, functionality and versatility should be at the center of design decisions.

Start with an inspiration piece. A bedspread or comforter, artwork, rug or color palette provides a starting point for design inspiration. Use your inspiration piece to build your room, pulling in colors or designs to coordinate.

One large, oversized rug has a bigger impact than smaller throw rugs, tying the design concept together and providing

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Coronavirus live news: WHO daily cases set new record at more than 350,000 | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

Updated





What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

Updated





Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

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Why Won’t White House Say When Trump Last Tested Negative? | Political News

By JILL COLVIN, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — It is a basic, crucial question and one the White House refuses to answer: When was President Donald Trump’s last negative test for the coronavirus before he tested positive last week?

“Yeah, I’m not going to give you a detailed readout with timestamps every time the president’s tested,” White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters last weekend.

“I can’t reveal that at this time,” echoed Alyssa Farah, the White House director of strategic communications. “Doctors would like to keep it private.”

“I don’t want to go backwards,” said Dr. Sean Conley, the president’s physician.

The answer could help fill in vital details about the course of the president’s illness as well as when he may have been contagious and whom else he may have exposed. And the White House refusal to answer makes it hard not to wonder what they’re hiding, given other details they’ve shared.

“At this point it’s just so strange that they’re unwilling to give us the information,” said Michael Joseph Mina, a physician and professor of epidemiology at Harvard’s school of public health. “It makes people start thinking things like, ‘Was the president the super-spreader?’… If there was no nefarious activity going on, then they should have no problem answering this question.”

The information is also key to tracking who else may have been exposed to the virus so their contacts can be traced to prevent new clusters of infection.

“Then you can get an idea, potentially, of when he was infected, how long his incubation period was, and also then evaluate who may have been exposed to him over that time frame,” said Benjamin Pinsky, medical director of the clinical virology laboratory at Stanford Health Care. While there is considerable variability between cases, he said, Trump was most likely infectious several days before he tested positive — a period during which he traveled and had close contact with dozens of people.

Senior White House staff and those who are in direct contact with the president are tested for the virus daily. The White House originally gave the impression that Trump, too, was tested every day, with McEnany claiming in July that Trump was “the most tested man in America” and tested “multiple times a day.” But Trump contradicted her, saying, “I do probably on average a test every two days, three days.”

The current White House line is that Trump is tested “regularly.”

Here’s what is known: On Wednesday, Sept. 30, during a trip to Minnesota for a fundraiser and rally, one of the president’s closest aides, Hope Hicks, began feeling ill. She isolated herself aboard Air Force Once during the trip home, but the White House appears to have taken no further action.

The next morning, Hicks was again tested for the virus. This time, the results came back positive, just as the president was about to leave for a fundraiser at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey. A frantic effort was made to

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Inmates cook up a storm in Changi catering kitchen as part of training, rehab programme, Courts & Crime News & Top Stories

SINGAPORE – When father-of-two Faruk was sentenced to seven years and 10 months’ jail in 2017 for drug-related offences, he did not expect to find a passion for decorating cakes or learning how to fold pastries while behind bars.

The 38-year-old, who declined to give his full name, spends six days a week in a kitchen as part of his work programme during his incarceration in the Changi Prison Complex.

While his family has yet to try his creations, the former mechanic hopes to make his sons, aged 12 and 13, their favourite strawberry cheesecake, when he is released.

“My family was surprised that I could bake cakes. I could see from their faces that they are happy I’m learning because I have never done this kind of thing before,” said Faruk in a phone interview on Wednesday (Oct 7). “(In the kitchen,) I learnt how to be patient, relax, and come up with more ideas to decorate (the cakes).”

He hopes to work in a pastry shop after his release.

About 30 or so inmates are chosen every year to work in The Changi Tearoom, after they have attended correctional programmes that support their rehabilitation.

They are chosen based on interest or prior experience working in the food and beverage sector. Other programmes include tailoring workshops and working in call centres.

Located in the prison complex, the catering kitchen serves as an industry-standard training ground for offenders.

It is managed by YR Industries, a subsidiary of the Yellow Ribbon Singapore. While the public can usually order catering services from the kitchen, it currently serves only prison staff in the light of Covid-19 safety measures.

Another offender, who wanted to be known only as Michael, said he refined his skills in The Changi Tearoom kitchen.

He is serving a 5½ years’ jail term for drug-related offences. The 29-year-old had previously worked as a chef for a decade before his incarceration in 2018.


Singapore Chefs’ Association chef mentor Dexter Lim (left) plating a course created with Michael. PHOTO: SINGAPORE PRISON SERVICE

He said: “I feel very lucky and very blessed to have this opportunity because there are only so many of us and (I am) able to gain something during this time.”

Michael plans to cook his family and friends a three-course feast after his release. “They deserve everything since I put them through so much and they’ve stood by me, so I want to do what I can for them.”

Faruk, Michael and the other chefs are in the midst of rolling out six-course meals for an online silent auction on Oct 22.

Four sets, each enough to feed four, will be delivered to the highest bidders, with all proceeds going to the Yellow Ribbon Fund.

The menu includes main course options of chicken roulade served with carrot mash and confit asparagus, or seared salmon with butter glazed vegetables, roast potatoes and oriental celery pesto. Dessert will be a florentine blueberry vanilla cheesecake.

They are being mentored by the Singapore

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Trump Maps Return to Campaign Trail After White House Says COVID-19 Treatment Complete | Top News

By Jeff Mason and Steve Holland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican President Donald Trump on Friday prepared to return to the campaign trail with a pair of weekend rallies after his COVID-19 diagnosis sidelined him for a week in the race against Democratic nominee Joe Biden for the White House.

Trump, who announced he had been infected with the coronavirus on Oct. 2 and spent three nights in a military hospital receiving treatment, said late on Thursday he was feeling “really good” and, with a doctor’s blessing, aimed to campaign in Florida on Saturday and in Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Trump’s illness has kept him from crisscrossing the country to rally support and raise cash in the final weeks before the Nov. 3 election. A return to in-person events would be aimed at convincing voters he is healthy enough to campaign and to govern.

While Trump has released several videos on Twitter, he has not appeared in public since he returned home from the hospital on Monday. Biden has continued to campaign, with events scheduled on Friday in Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines say people who are severely ill with COVID-19 might need to stay home for up to 20 days after symptoms first appear.

Biden, who has sharply criticized Trump’s handling of the pandemic, is beating the Republican in national polls, though that lead is narrower in some of the swing states that may determine the election’s outcome.

White House physician Sean Conley said in a memo released on Thursday that Trump had completed his course of therapy for COVID-19, remained stable since returning home from the hospital and could resume public engagements on Saturday.

Sounding hoarse and occasionally pausing and clearing his throat, Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview late on Thursday that he was likely to be tested for the virus on Friday. The White House has declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

“I feel so good,” Trump said.

The president is expected to host a “virtual rally” on Friday by appearing on conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh’s radio program.

The Trump and Biden campaigns sparred on Thursday over a televised debate that had been planned for next week. Trump pulled out after the nonpartisan commission in charge said the Oct. 15 event would be held virtually with the candidates in separate locations because of health and safety concerns after Trump contracted COVID-19. Biden’s campaign arranged a town hall-style event in Philadelphia instead.

Trump’s White House and campaign have experienced an outbreak of the virus in the last week, with multiple top aides, including the president’s press secretary and campaign manager, testing positive.

Trump and his staff have largely eschewed wearing masks, against the guidance of health professionals, and held rallies with thousands of people in indoor and outdoor venues despite recommendations against having events with large crowds.

Trump’s health will remain in the spotlight even if he begins holding events again.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason and

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Coronavirus live news: doctor clears Trump to return to public events on Saturday; record global case rise | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

Updated





What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

Updated





Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

Read more