Drive-In movies coming to Cultura Beer Garden just in time for Halloween

Laredo film lovers have not had much to celebrate recently, with closures announced at two major Laredo theaters — the Alamo Drafthouse and Regal Cinema — and the delay of a number of big-budget movies. However, local nonprofit Laredo Film Society is doing all it can to keep the love of cinema alive in Laredo.

In partnership with Cultura Beer Garden, the organization is hosting a series of drive-in movies designed to give locals a safe, movie-going experience amid restrictions in place to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

In celebration of the Halloween season, the movies selected for the series are all designed to get Laredoans in a spooky mood.


On Saturday, October 17, a screening of 1985 Italian horror film “Phenomena”. Directed by horror master Dario Argento and starring a young Jennifer Connelly in the lead role, the film tells the tale of a teen girl who attempts to chase a serial killer after she discovers her psychic powers.

On Halloween night, the group will screen cult classic “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”.  The 1975 musical comedy horror film stars Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, and Barry Bostwick and is a musical tribute to the campy horror and science fiction B movies that populated theaters from the 30s to the 60s. The film’s plot centers around a young couple whose car breaks down, leading them to the wild world of Dr. Frank-n-Furter and company.

In addition to the film screening, Cultura’s food trucks will be in full operation, with many of the trucks offering special movie snacks for the locals in attendance. Note though, that outside food and drinks will be prohibited.

Tickets start at $10 for al fresco seating and are available to purchase at laredofilm.org/tickets. Tickets for the Halloween night screening will go on sale at a later date.

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Stream These Spooky Haunted House Movies

Note: Series’ availability on streaming platforms is subject to change, and varies by country. If you’re looking for more streaming recommendations, subscribe to the Times’s Watching newsletter.

The B-movie maestro William Castle lards “House on Haunted Hill” with one high-concept hook after another: A millionaire (Vincent Price) offers a $10,000 prize for anyone who can survive his “haunted house” party, complete with loaded pistols issued to guests in miniature coffins, and a burbling vat of acid on site. Part chiller, part whodunit, the film is like witnessing a deliciously macabre parlor game.

Four people are summoned to a creepy mansion for a paranormal investigation, but the house itself is the star — all creaky floorboards, pulsating walls and a doorknob turning back and forth. The awful 1999 remake turned Hill House into a C.G.I. light show, but Robert Wise’s original, shot in luxuriant black-and-white, burns on a slow wick of shadows and suggestion. There are haunted house movies of greater psychological complexity and invention, but “The Haunting” remains the gold standard.

Fresh from a stay in a mental institution, Jessica (Zohra Lampert) seeks refuge at an old Connecticut farmhouse, which happens to be the site where a woman drowned on her wedding day in 1880. As she, her husband, their friend, and a mysterious drifter settle into the place, the bizarre events that follow — and the sinister whispers and tension between the conspiratorial townspeople (all wearing bandages) and these hippie interlocutors — loosen Jessica’s tenuous grip on her sanity.

“The Belasco House” was named after an unspeakably perverse, six-foot-five millionaire who indulged in every vice imaginable, running the gamut from alcoholism and heroin addiction to incest, necrophilia, bestiality and cannibalism. “Bad vibes” don’t begin to describe the psychic energy on the premises, but four intrepid paranormal investigators poke around anyway, including a half-dazed Roddy McDowall as a man who visited the house before and barely lived to return. The libertine sexuality of early ’70s cinema gives “The Legend of Hell House” a sensual charge, but it’s equally blessed by the dry British humor that undercuts the horror.

Released at a time when “Scream” and its knockoffs were simultaneously deconstructing and reviving the slasher genre, “The Others” moved decisively in the other direction, introducing modern audiences to the classic (and good-for-all-ages) style of classic haunted house movies. Nicole Kidman’s haircut alone is a time machine, as are the atmospheric mysteries shrouding a Victorian home visited by ghosts.

In J.A. Bayona’s gothic Spanish frightfest, a woman and her husband buy the creepy seaside orphanage where she was raised with the intention of turning it into a home for sick children. What follows is a barrage of horror tropes: Children as ghouls in burlap masks, references to fairy tales like “Hansel & Gretel,” Super 8 home movies, the séance of “Poltergeist.” Rooted in the scares is the vulnerability of the young

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The Dramatic Downside of Home Decor Ideas in Movies

Movie sets make all kinds of fantastic home décor ideas seem possible, but many of these ideas would have major downsides in real life.

Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory
The chocolate factory is a big inspiration to kids everywhere. The pre-teen audience salivates at the sight of the chocolate river, teacup flowers, and trees with balloon-like candy fruit. Who wouldn't want a gigantic room where everything is edible? A reasonable adult with foresight-that's who wouldn't want the biohazard of such a playspace. First, there's the impossible task of fending off insects and replacing expired candy trees. Secondly, inviting any guests to enjoy would be as biologically risky as sharing a lollipop with a group of friends. The only adult who would be interested in a room or house of candy is the witch in Hansel and Gretel.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre
The murderous family in the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie is not portrayed in a very favorable light. "Stand your ground" laws and "castle" doctrines give homeowners in many states the legal authority to kill intruders, and it's arguably a social prejudice that favors guns over chainsaws for home defense. That said, resorting to cannibalism and using bones to make furniture perhaps takes things a bit too far. The 1974 film featured a love seat and other furniture decorated with bones, which isn't a terrible idea in itself. So many decades before Etsy, it's understandable that crafty types would struggle through some trial and error with new ideas for home décor. Antlers and horns are now quite popular for chairs and other furniture, but human bones are legally problematic to collect and decoratively repurpose.

Every Bond Villain Lair Ever
Throughout the 007 film franchise, it has become a cliché that Bond villains talk too much, choose execution methods that are far too complex, and invest far too much money in home décor. Still, the spectacle of hideouts on private islands and the moon can be impressive. In The Spy Who Loved Me, the villain's submersible lair is unforgettable. Paintings rise and reveal windows to an underwater world with sharks and giant fish. Since underwater construction can be prohibitively expensive (and complicated in respect to zoning laws), many homeowners may be tempted to recreate the effect with large aquariums. Sure, a giant aquarium isn't as expensive as a moon colony, but it can certainly come close. Don't forget to calculate maintenance costs, cleaning, and occasional fish replacements. Even if you have the maturity to resist getting a shark, it's a fish eat fish world underwater.

House of Wax
A few different film adaptations have been made of this concept, but (spoiler alert) the climax involves the entire house melting. This twist may be more surprising for inattentive moviegoers because the building is also a wax museum. Nevertheless, this film is a helpful reminder to choose residential construction materials carefully. Whenever it's time for constructing a new addition or adding home décor accents, it's good to look into any risks associated with new …

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