Trump’s alternate reality of Covid-19 crumbles as the White House sends mixed messages about President’s health

Some seven months into a pandemic that has killed more than 209,000 Americans, the nation is now facing a grave governing crisis with its commander in chief hospitalized — his condition hinging on his progress over the coming days — as the White House events of the past week serve as a textbook example of how not to handle a deadly virus.



a man talking on a cell phone: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Late Saturday night, the public learned new details about why President Donald Trump was airlifted to the hospital Friday, when chief of staff Mark Meadows said during an interview with Fox News that Trump had a fever on Friday morning and his oxygen level had “dropped rapidly.” Meadows added that Trump has made “unbelievable improvements from yesterday morning.”

A memo from Trump’s physician earlier Saturday night said that Trump had “made substantial progress” since his diagnosis but “is not yet out of the woods.”

Speaking from a White House that already has a huge credibility problem with the public, Meadows’ statement capped a 24-hour period that served as a master class in opacity and contradiction that raised major questions about the President’s health — and renewed questions about this administration’s ability to tell the truth.

Trump has been watching and critiquing coverage of his hospitalization from the presidential suite at Walter Reed and has been agitated at what he claims are exaggerated descriptions of his condition, people familiar with the matter said.

Those people told CNN that Trump seemed particularly upset when he saw a quote saying he was displaying “concerning” symptoms on Friday attributed to a person familiar with his health but later assigned by the New York Times and Associated Press to Meadows.

The comment about the President’s vitals hinted that his condition was more worrisome than his doctors let on. But the President’s aversion to appearing weak and sick is now what is driving the effort to project resolve, including a video he tweeted from Walter Reed on Saturday, the photos released by the White House of him working and the multiple accounts of phone calls where he sounded strong by his allies and family members.

For much of this year, Trump has spun an alternate reality about the dangers of coronavirus — disputing science and the efficacy of masks, downplaying the risks to the American people, and making false statements about how 99% of coronavirus cases in America are “totally harmless” or that the virus “affects virtually nobody.”

He encouraged his aides and advisers to live in that dangerous fantasy land, pushing his luck to the limits as late as this past week when he again recklessly gathered thousands of unmasked Americans at his political

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Donald Trump’s alternate reality of Covid-19 crumbles as the White House sends mixed messages about President’s health

Some seven months into a pandemic that has killed more than 209,000 Americans, the nation is now facing a grave governing crisis with its commander in chief hospitalized — his condition hinging on his progress over the coming days — as the White House events of the past week serve as a textbook example of how not to handle a deadly virus.



a man talking on a cell phone: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 02: U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the South Lawn of the White House on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Late Saturday night, the public learned new details about why President Donald Trump was airlifted to the hospital Friday, when chief of staff Mark Meadows said during an interview with Fox News that Trump had a fever on Friday morning and his oxygen level had “dropped rapidly.” Meadows added that Trump has made “unbelievable improvements from yesterday morning.”

A memo from Trump’s physician earlier Saturday night said that Trump had “made substantial progress” since his diagnosis but “is not yet out of the woods.”

Speaking from a White House that already has a huge credibility problem with the public, Meadows’ statement capped a 24-hour period that served as a master class in opacity and contradiction that raised major questions about the President’s health — and renewed questions about this administration’s ability to tell the truth.

Trump has been watching and critiquing coverage of his hospitalization from the presidential suite at Walter Reed and has been agitated at what he claims are exaggerated descriptions of his condition, people familiar with the matter said.

Those people told CNN that Trump seemed particularly upset when he saw a quote saying he was displaying “concerning” symptoms on Friday attributed to a person familiar with his health but later assigned by the New York Times and Associated Press to Meadows.

The comment about the President’s vitals hinted that his condition was more worrisome than his doctors let on. But the President’s aversion to appearing weak and sick is now what is driving the effort to project resolve, including a video he tweeted from Walter Reed on Saturday, the photos released by the White House of him working and the multiple accounts of phone calls where he sounded strong by his allies and family members.

For much of this year, Trump has spun an alternate reality about the dangers of coronavirus — disputing science and the efficacy of masks, downplaying the risks to the American people, and making false statements about how 99% of coronavirus cases in America are “totally harmless” or that the virus “affects virtually nobody.”

He encouraged his aides and advisers to live in that dangerous fantasy land, pushing his luck to the limits as late as this past week when he again recklessly gathered thousands of unmasked Americans at his political

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Trump says ‘real test’ ahead in his COVID fight after mixed messages from White House

Video: Donald Trump’s doctor suggests president may have had coronavirus on Wednesday 30th (The Independent)

Donald Trump’s doctor suggests president may have had coronavirus on Wednesday 30th

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UP NEXT

By Alexandra Alper and Jeff Mason



a man standing on a boat: U.S. President Trump arrives to spend at least several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
U.S. President Trump arrives to spend at least several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump told Americans from his hospital room that the next few days will be the “real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, after a series of contradictory messages from the White House caused widespread confusion about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter on Saturday from his hospital suite at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a tired-looking Trump said he was feeling “much better.”



a truck is parked on the side of a road: Trump supporters gather for a car parade


© Reuters/MEGAN JELINGER
Trump supporters gather for a car parade

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said into the camera, seated in front of an American flag and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt.



Donald Trump sitting in a box: U.S. President Donald Trump, who is being treated for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a military hospital outside Washington, makes announcement via video


© Reuters/THE WHITE HOUSE
U.S. President Donald Trump, who is being treated for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a military hospital outside Washington, makes announcement via video

The remarks came hours after differing assessments of his health from administration officials left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for the new coronavirus on Thursday night, a matter of enormous public concern.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. One doctor said Trump told them, “I feel like I could walk out of here today.”



a person holding a sign: Supporters rally at a vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JONATHAN ERNST
Supporters rally at a vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, telling them, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”



Donald Trump holding a pair of people wearing costumes: Supporters hold vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JONATHAN ERNST
Supporters hold vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks.

Administration officials have described the move to Walter Reed as precautionary and said Trump would stay for several days.

Another source who was

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After mixed messages from White House, Trump says ‘real test’ ahead in his COVID fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said from his hospital room on Saturday that he felt “much better” but the next few days will be “the real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, capping a day of contradictory messages from the White House about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter, Trump, looking tired and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt, said he “wasn’t feeling so well” when he first arrived at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday.

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said, seated at a round table in front of an American flag.

The remarks came hours after differing assessments of his health from administration officials left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, a matter of enormous public concern.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. One doctor said Trump told them, ‘I feel like I could walk out of here today.’

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, telling them, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks.

Administration officials have described the move to Walter Reed as precautionary and said Trump would stay at the hospital for several days.

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Another source who was briefed on Trump’s condition said the president was given supplemental oxygen before he went to the hospital. The decision to hospitalize Trump came after he had experienced difficulty breathing and his oxygen level dropped, according to a source familiar with the situation.

White House doctor Sean P. Conley told reporters outside the hospital on Saturday that Trump had not had trouble breathing, and was not given oxygen at Walter Reed.

“The team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made,” Conley said.

He declined to give a timetable for Trump’s possible release from the hospital, and later had to issue a statement saying he misspoke after appearing to suggest Trump had been diagnosed as early as Wednesday.

In a statement on Saturday evening, Conley said the president was “not yet out of the woods” but his team remained cautiously optimistic.

“Today’s spectacle – doctors saying one

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Melania Trump Unveils Newly Renovated Rose Garden To Mixed Reactions

FLOTUS Melania Trump unveiled her White House Rose Garden renovation on Saturday, and the internet had a major reaction

In late July, the First Lady of the United States Melania Trump announced she was embarking on an exciting project: overseeing the renovation of the White House’s famous Rose Garden. Dating back to the early 1900s, the gorgeous outdoor space has been utilized by several Presidents as a stunning backdrop for many a press conferences. Most recently, Donald Trump had been using it for his White House Coronavirus Task Force press conferences. On Saturday, just in time for her Republican National Convention speech, FLOTUS unveiled her massive home improvement project — and social media had major thoughts about it.

“Excited to honor history & celebrate the future in our beautiful @WhiteHouse Rose Garden this evening,” Mrs. Trump captioned a photo of the garden on Instagram. “Thank you to all who helped renew this iconic & truly gorgeous space.”

When announcing the project, she explained she would be restoring to its 1962 design, when President John F. Kennedy hired famed horticulturist and philanthropist Rachel “Bunny” Mellon to create a masterpiece.

“The very act of planting a garden involves hard work and hope in the possibility of a bright future,” the first lady said in a statement. “Preserving the history and beauty of the White House and its grounds is a testament to our nation’s commitment to the care of this landscape and our dedication to American ideals, safeguarding them for our children and their children for generations to come.”

After three weeks of renovations, Trump removed most of the colorful flowers and plants from the garden, replacing them with mostly pastels, including taller white roses in honor of the first papal visit to the White House by Pope John Paul II in 1979. She also added a diamond-like shape of boxwoods and removed nearly a dozen crabapple trees. Other changes include the removal of a seating area on the east side of the garden, and the addition of a 3-foot-wide limestone walking path that borders the central lawn.

As for the cost of the renovation, the White House refused to reveal how much money they spent but ensured that it was funded by private donations.

Reaction to the renovated garden space was mixed, with people having major opinions about Trump’s project.

Some people were mostly concerned about the design element of it.

Others felt it was a bit insensitive, due to the state of the world with the coronavirus pandemic. Charles M. Blow, a New York Times columnist, even declared it a “Marie Antionette moment, tweeting, “Who cares about a redesigned rose garden when we’re in the middle of a pandemic, 175+ people are dead and millions are out of work?”

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