dalit lilienthal adorns minimalist interior in tel aviv with custom-made furniture

interior design studio dalit lilienthal has completed the renovation of an apartment in tel aviv, to generate a flexible, modifiable family home. the whole layout of the flat was altered to create an open plan interior, that allows natural light and air to flow right through. 

modular box 1
all images courtesy of studio dalit lilienthal

 

 

studio dalit lilienthal has demolished all inner walls to design a permeable new dwelling. at the same time, the design incorporates large windows, which ensure ventilation and at the same time, allow residents to feel closer to the outdoors. despite this open character, the house is designed to easily generate more intimate area when needed, without compromising its spaciousness.

modular box 2

 

 

instead of designing a corridor to lead residents towards the bedrooms, the architects have created a box, incorporating various storage solutions and functions. this structure defines the bedrooms and the workspace, while still allowing a pleasant flow and effortless circulation to develop within the interior. the box features a set of sliding doors, made from a metal mesh sheet, allowing light to penetrate through while establishing privacy between the public and private areas. when these doors open and close, the apartment’s appearance changes completely. 

 

 

 

the overall design applies a monochromatic color scheme, enhanced by natural materials such as different types of woods along with a mix of metals. in the kitchen, the materiality includes stainless steel surfaces and iron elements, combined with custom-made carpentry offering ample storage solutions. with meticulous attention to detail, combining comfort and aesthetics, the dwelling provides an intimate open-plan, modular space.

modular box 3

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modular box 5

 

modular box 6

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modular box 7

 

project info:

 

name: modular box
architecture office: interior design studio dalit lilienthal
location: tel aviv, israel
size: 100 m2

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: myrto katsikopoulou | designboom

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Is minimalist decor a new thing for a decluttered life? Here are a few tricks to clear your living space

If you’re someone who loves hoarding stuff, is a compulsive buyer and craves a need to re-decorate empty spaces only to regret it later, here are some ways to minimize all that and simplify your life for a mindful living space.

 

In order to stop feeling anxious, you need to declutter your house, organize them and add only the essentials. The benefits of decluttering your house are many as it often leads to decluttering your mind in return. You feel more in control of your possessions, and less stressed. Here are a few ways to declutter your house and get rid of all the unwanted stuff that doesn’t belong to your house.

1. Buy more plants than furniture



a vase of flowers on a kitchen counter


© Provided by Pinkvilla


A simple step to declutter your house is by actually buying less furniture, getting rid of the old ones and replacing it with more house plants. This way, you’ll feel more relaxed, calm and composed. Plants are said to release more endorphins in your brain and hence, produce more positivity in the house.

 

2. Paint Your Walls

 

Instead of purchasing wall hangings and wasting money, you can simply use your skills and art to paint walls and draw subtle murals that will amplify your room and make it look simple. You can also add fairy lights to make it look more elegant.

 

3. Donate clothes that you never wear



a small child sitting on a bed


© Provided by Pinkvilla


Now, this should be a part of your monthly routine while cleaning your room. We always have too many clothes and still feel the need to buy more. Start by decluttering your wardrobe and donate clothes that you never wear to the needy ones. 

 

4. Get rid of all the unnecessary beauty products

 

The trick to this is, buy one makeup product that will serve all purposes. You can reduce one step in your skincare or makeup routine. Some products that you own may not be of any use and they must be lying in your drawer for months, simply get rid of them!

 

5. Throw away all the expired canned food

 

How many times do you do a thorough check of all the food items lying in the kitchen, on your dining table, or in your refrigerator? Check their expiry date and throw them in the trash can before you or anyone else in the house gets diarrhea.

 

Also Read: 6 Bathroom flooring tips and ideas to revamp the area

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Christian Liaigre, Minimalist Interior Designer, Dies at 77

Mr. Liaigre was born on Aug. 10, 1943, in La Rochelle, France. His father was a veterinarian, and his grandfather, for whom he worked for a decade after attending the École des Beaux-Arts and the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, bred horses.

He is survived by his wife, Deborah Comte-Liaigre; their son, Leonard; and a granddaughter. His daughter, Virginie, died last year.

Mr. Liaigre’s design roots were French Modernism, Asian furniture, African art and riding hardware — bridles, saddles and stirrups. Many compared him to Jean-Michel Frank, the early French minimalist, but “with less ennui,” as Mitchell Owens, the decorative arts editor at Architectural Digest, said in an interview.

“Liaigre’s work had a butchness to it,” he added. “It was very male and very architectural.”

Decades earlier, Mr. Owens had interviewed Mr. Liaigre about how his upbringing had influenced his work He recapped the interview on Instagram:

“We talked of his childhood near La Rochelle, his potent memories of his veterinary surgeon father’s tools and of accompanying him from farm to farm throughout the Vendee, his respect for woodworkers and love of chestnut and oak trees, and his belief in furniture that, no matter how reductivist, held the whiff of the terroir in its design.”

Former employees described Mr. Liaigre as a quiet, meticulous teacher whose drawings were always perfectly to scale. “He felt that to get the proportions right, the only way to do it was by hand,” said Kirstin Bailey, a designer in Mr. Liaigre’s studio in the 1990s.

Mr. Liaigre sold his company to a group of investors in 2016.

“To say that he was detail-oriented would be a gross understatement,” Mr. Balazs of the Mercer wrote in an Instagram post. “‘Obsession’ would be far more apt.”

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stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

taiwanese architecture firm studioX4 has completely transformed a residential interior in taipei. dubbed transparency, the project explores the various properties of light, playing with contrasts of opaque and translucent surfaces, as well as light transmission and ambient occlusion, to generate interesting visual effects.

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

all images by YHLAA (yi-hsien lee)

 

 

the interior designed by studioX4 integrates a series of contradicting elements, like curves and angles, steel and concrete cement, yin and yang. massing, shadow, and proportion were crucial to the completion of the project, and everything exists with adequate fusion. the whole design generates a simple, elegant space, with a stainless steel wall reflecting the residents’ daily life. this wall bears the kitchen, along with storage, pipes, air-con, etc. while supporting the essential fixtures of daily living, its distinct appearance also completes the overall spatial expression harmoniously.

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

 

 

the whole interior can be observed as a bare container of habitation, becoming the background of a lifestyle sprouted from modernism and minimalism. the architecture generates a living space were inhabitants can satisfy their physical needs, bonded with philosophical denotation. the simplistic aesthetics allow people to emerge with profound thoughts and emotions in a detailed, stylish environment. 

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

stainless steel wall reflects daily life within minimalist interior by studioX4 in taipei

 

 

 

 

project info: 

 

 

name: transparency

architects: studioX4

lead designer: li yu cheng

design team: yucheng chen, yy yang, a-ru tzeng

location: taipei,taiwan

area: 122 m2 

 

myrto katsikopoulou I designboom

sep 16, 2020

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Volkswagen shows off minimalist interior of its forthcoming ID 4 electric SUV

Volkswagen’s ID 4 will make its global debut at the end of September, but before then the German automaker is giving a sneak peek at the new electric SUV’s interior. Unsurprisingly, it has a sparse, minimalist look that appears inspired by Tesla and other electric vehicles on the market.

VW didn’t offer any information about the vehicle’s touchscreens or infotainment system. But from the pictures, we can see that the ID 4 will have two screens, a trapezoidal one behind the steering column and a horizontal one in the center stack. The home screen will feature apps for vehicle settings, radio, battery information, navigation, and other functions.

VW isn’t going “maximal minimalist” as The Verge’s Nilay Patel once called the Tesla Model 3 by eliminating all physical buttons and channeling all vehicle functions through the center screen. There is a row of buttons below the dash for climate control and emergency braking, among others. And there’s a panel of buttons to the left of the steering wheel.

The lighting scheme appears to be a big selling point. VW calls it the “ID.Light system” that consists of a light strip below the windscreen that will change color to signal navigation prompts, in-coming calls, locked doors, or other functions.

The ID 4 will be VW’s first electric vehicle to hit the North American market. The automaker’s first EV, the ID 3 hatchback, is only being sold in Europe. The ID 4 will be unveiled later this month, after which it will go on sale in Europe. North American deliveries won’t start until the vehicle goes into production at VW’s factory in Tennessee in 2022.

The ID 4 is expected to get around 300 miles of range on a full charge and is built on the same modular EV platform that will power VW’s other ID vehicles. There will be both all-wheel and rear-wheel drive layouts, with the former being the version available at launch. The battery is positioned in the center of the underbody to create a low center of gravity and optimize driving dynamics. The digital cockpit will operate using touchscreens and intuitive voice commands.

Hopefully the rollout of the ID 4 goes smoother than the ID 3, which was marred by software glitches that delayed deliveries to customers. It was a black eye for the project, and one of the reasons why VW CEO Herbert Diess was stripped of his role at the brand in June.

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