Milwaukee bar Brothers expands, reopens with new menu, TVs, patio

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Brothers Bar and Grill is reopening at 1213 N. Water St. on Oct. 8. It is twice the size of its previous space and now has a full kitchen, 45 TVs, outdoor beer garden and more. (Photo: Jordyn Noennig)

Brothers Bar and Grill is new and improved, and ready to reopen in Milwaukee. 

The Water Street bar closed in November to prepare for an expansion that combined its previous space with the next-door space, the former Milwaukee Moulding & Frame building. 

After almost a year it is reopening an 8,000-square-foot space that includes ample seating, an arcade and dance floor. There are 45 TVs throughout the building for game watching and 40 draft lines for beers. A 2,000-square-foot beer garden is outside. 

“It’s unrecognizable from before,” said Marc Fortney, co-owner of Brothers, 1213 N. Water St. “We’re really bringing everything. It’s the new version of Brothers.”

The bar and restaurant chain is based in La Crosse and has 20 locations across the country. Fortney said Brothers started as a college bar, but its new locations have been larger and more family-friendly. 

“As we’ve gotten older, we’ve thought more about what we would want in a bar, and brought that to Brothers,” he said. “We’re available for family dining, and after 10 p.m. we’ll be 21 and older and focus on that crowd.” 

The Milwaukee Brothers is the first remodeled location in Wisconsin. 

“We don’t have this in La Crosse,” Fortney said. “We thought it was a great opportunity to do this in Milwaukee with the Fiserv Forum right there. It’s really exciting for us to bring this here to Wisconsin. We’re just beaming.”

Features of the new Brothers include custom wood bars, one 40 feet long on the first floor and a second bar on the second floor. 

The dance floor has unique lighting and a dedicated DJ booth. Pool tables and dartboards are found throughout, as are murals. The second floor is available for renting out and overlooks the first floor. 

The beer garden has a retractable roof, heaters, televisions and sliding garage doors. Exposed Cream City brick is throughout the interior and exterior, and the outside of the building also got a remodel. 

“We really pulled out all the stops for this place,” Fortney said. 

The new full kitchen will serve lunch and dinner. Its menu includes burgers, wings,

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A listing of home and garden events for the Milwaukee area (Fall 2020 edition)

Find home improvement and gardening classes for Milwaukee, Waukesha and the surrounding counties. Here is a roundup of home and garden events, craft and hobby shows, and where to find more information:



a group of people standing in a garden: They're decking out the Mitchell Park Domes for the popular Milwaukee landmark's annual holiday show, which opens Saturday.


© Michael Sears/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
They’re decking out the Mitchell Park Domes for the popular Milwaukee landmark’s annual holiday show, which opens Saturday.

All Saints Lutheran Church: Fall Craft Fair, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Nov. 7. Crafters, raffle, bake sale and luncheon. 9131 S. Howell Ave., Oak Creek. (414) 762-5111.

American Legion Park: Pioneer Farm Days, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 10-11. Old-time farm show with antique tractors, engines and machinery. Flea market, farmers market and food. Free admission. 9327 S. Shepard Ave., Oak Creek. (414) 768-8580; pioneerfarmdays.com

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Apple Holler: Apple Picking, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Last bag sold one hour before closing. 5006 S. Sylvania Ave., Sturtevant, (262) 884-7100; appleholler.com

Boerner Botanical Gardens: Outdoor grounds are open daily without reservation, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. (through Oct. 30). Visitor Center is closed. Whitnall Park, 9400 Boerner Drive, Hales Corners. Information: (414) 525-5600; boernerbotanicalgardens.org

  • Wednesday Night Walks. Sept. 30, Oct. 7 and 14.

Cedar Creek Settlement: Festive Friday Eves are held from 5 to 9 p.m. and feature holiday entertainment and activities, gift and specialty shops, antique stores, galleries, restaurants, and the Cedar Creek Winery decorated for the holidays. N70-W6340 Bridge Road, Cedarburg, (262) 377-8020. cedarcreeksettlement.com

  • Settlement Christmas Showcase. Nov. 20.
  • Home for the Holidays. Nov. 27.
  • Santa’s Workshop. Dec. 4.
  • The Christmas Spirit. Dec. 11.
  • Countdown to Christmas. Dec. 18.

Cedarburg Artists Guild: Covered Bridge Art Studio Tour, noon-5 p.m. Oct. 9; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 10-11. Free. Artists open their studio spaces to the public. Tour begins at any of the locations in Port Washington, Grafton, Cedarburg and Mequon. Most of the artists will be creating art during the event and will explain their artistic processes and inspirations. cedarburgartistsguild.com

Cedarburg Cultural Center: “The Sick to Death of It” Gothic History Tour, 6:30 p.m. Oct. 23-34 and Oct. 30-31. One mile walk is 90 minutes with steps, no seating or bathrooms, and sidewalks and ground may be dark or uneven in the cemetery. Advance ticket purchase required. W62-N546 Washington Ave., Cedarburg..(262) 375-3676; cedarburgculturalcenter.org

Christkindl LIVE Market: Virtual Christmas market with live stream experience, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Nov. 15-Dec. 31. Christkindl.live

Delafield Hotel: Boutique Wedding Showcase, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Nov. 29. Visit with vendors offering a variety of wedding services. Complimentary admission and valet parking. 415 Genesee St., Delafield. premierbridewisconsin.com

East Troy Railroad Museum: Fall Harvest Fest Trains, Saturday-Sunday, (through Oct. 25). Christmas Trains, Nov. 28-29, Dec. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20. Advance electronic ticket purchase required. Depot, 2002 Church St., East Troy. (262) 642-3263; easttroyrr.org

Elegant Farmer Harvest Fest: Weekend of activities include a corn maze for all ages, hayrides, pony rides and train rides, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday (through Oct. 25). Check out what’s picking in the orchard, or shop the Farm Kitchen Bakery, Deli & Market, 1545 Main

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Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed

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An urban garden and community education center is planned for a vacant lot south of West Walnut Street and east of North 15th Street. (Photo: Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a central city site northwest of downtown Milwaukee.

It would be developed on a 9,000-square-foot vacant lot, south of West Walnut Street between North 14th Lane and North 15th Street, by Venus Consulting LLC, according to a new Common Council resolution.

That resolution calls for selling the city-owned lot for $1 to Venus Consulting, which a Department of City Development report describes as a community advocacy, activism and education organization.

The property would “be developed with garden amenities focusing on herbs, edible flowers, butterfly garden and serenity/meditation spaces,” the report said.

Most of the space would be used to grow medicinal plants, which can be used to make teas, and edible plants, said Jacqueline Ward, who operates Venus Consulting.

People would be taught how to grow those plants in their yards, homes or community gardens, Ward said.

The teaching would include a focus on the health benefits of eating plants, and the importance of creating space for bees and butterflies, which pollinate other crops, she said.

It’s not a traditional garden, said Ward, former executive director of theMarketplace Business Improvement District, which operates near the garden site.

“This is a totally new concept, focused on outdoor learning experiences (especially in wake of pandemic),” Ward wrote in an email.

Venus Consulting, a for-profit firm, would manage the operation, and do some programming. Superior Care Training Center Corp., a separate nonprofit group Ward operates, would provide teaching services.

“Another component will be working with small emerging nonprofit organizations and neighborhood associations helping them figure out how to utilize and create areas of conception of lots to bring people together (as gardens, meet up spaces-considering social distancing and safety) and how these small pieces of land can be a space for community and economic development,” she wrote.

Other nearby urban community gardens include Alice’s Garden, at North 21st Street and West Garfield Avenue.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at [email protected] and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

Read or Share this story: https://www.jsonline.com/story/money/real-estate/commercial/2020/09/28/milwaukee-urban-garden-community-education-center-proposed-central-city/3559624001/

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Can small pieces of land can bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed



a house on the side of a road: An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a vacant lot near West Walnut and North 25th streets.


© City of Milwaukee
An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a vacant lot near West Walnut and North 25th streets.

An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a central city site northwest of downtown Milwaukee.

It would be developed on a 9,000-square-foot vacant lot, south of West Walnut Street between North 24th Lane and North 25th Street, by Venus Consulting LLC, according to a new Common Council resolution.

That resolution calls for selling the city-owned lot for $1 to Venus Consulting, which a Department of City Development report describes as a community advocacy, activism and education organization.

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The property would “be developed with garden amenities focusing on herbs, edible flowers, butterfly garden and serenity/meditation spaces,” the report said.

Most of the space would be used to grow medicinal plants, which can be used to make teas, and edible plants, said Jacqueline Ward, who operates Venus Consulting.

People would be taught how to grow those plants in their yards, homes or community gardens, Ward said.

The teaching would include a focus on the health benefits of eating plants, and the importance of creating space for bees and butterflies, which pollinate other crops, she said.

It’s not a traditional garden, said Ward, former executive director of the Marketplace Business Improvement District, which operates near the garden site.

“This is a totally new concept, focused on outdoor learning experiences (especially in wake of pandemic),” Ward wrote in an email.

Venus Consulting, a for-profit firm, would manage the operation, and do some programming. Superior Care Training Center Corp., a separate nonprofit group Ward operates, would provide teaching services.

“Another component will be working with small emerging nonprofit organizations and neighborhood associations helping them figure out how to utilize and create areas of conception of lots to bring people together (as gardens, meet up spaces-considering social distancing and safety) and how these small pieces of land can be a space for community and economic development,” she wrote.

Other nearby urban community gardens include Alice’s Garden, at North 21st Street and West Garfield Avenue.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at [email protected] and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Can small pieces of land can bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed

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