Michelle Obama expresses empathy for White House staff ‘touched by this virus’ and urges Americans to vote.

The former first lady Michelle Obama, one of the Democratic Party’s most respected figures, delivered what the Biden campaign called her “closing argument” for Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s candidacy on Tuesday, speaking in deeply personal terms to Americans disillusioned by politics about the need to vote.

In a 24-minute video, Mrs. Obama appealed to parents and young people, white working-class Americans and people of color, lashing President Trump’s mismanagement of the coronavirus — “he continues to gaslight the American people by acting like this pandemic is not a real threat,” she said — and warning that Mr. Trump’s habit of stoking division could be an effective political tool. She urged voting as the best remedy.

“We can expect that this election will be won by the slimmest of margins, just like it was four years ago,” Mrs. Obama said. “A handful of votes per precinct in Pennsylvania, or Arizona, or Wisconsin, or Florida, or anywhere else will make all the difference.”

As she released the video on her own social media platforms, Mrs. Obama acknowledged Mr. Trump’s Covid-19 diagnosis. She alluded to his decision to return to the White House while still receiving treatment for the virus, and the choice to take a drive outside of the hospital on Sunday, a move that some medical experts saw as dangerous for the Secret Service agents around the president.

“My heart goes out to everyone touched by this virus, from those at the White House, especially the Secret Service and residence staff whose service ought never be taken for granted, to all those names and stories most of us will unfortunately never know,” she wrote on Twitter.

In the video, Mrs. Obama appeared to speak implicitly to white voters who are struggling economically and are put off by terms like white privilege.

“It is frustrating to hear some folks say that you’ve been the beneficiary of privilege, that the color of your skin gives you a head start,” she said. “But right now, the president and his allies are trying to tap into that frustration and distract from his breathtaking failures by giving folks someone to blame other than them. They’re stoking fears about Black and brown Americans.”

That approach, she said, is “morally wrong, and yes, it is racist. But that doesn’t mean it won’t work.”

“As a Black woman who has — like the overwhelming majority of people of color in this nation — done everything in my power to live a life of dignity, and service, and honesty, the knowledge that any of my fellow Americans is more afraid of me than the chaos we are living through right now, well, that hurts,” Mrs. Obama said.“Imagine how it feels to wake up every day and do your very best to uphold the values that this country claims to holds dear — truth, honor, decency — only to have those efforts met by scorn, not just by your fellow citizens, but by a sitting president.”

Mrs. Obama said on Twitter

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Michelle Keegan in the bedroom, Jesy Nelson on the kitchen table…what stars’ selfie backdrop says about them

GOT a room for improvement?

Here, Siobhan O’Connor asks body language expert Judi James why a host of stars picked these particular spaces for their selfies and Insta shots. Designer Faye Robinson-Hey gives her verdict on the decor, too.

LOUISE: Centre of attention

Louise Redknapp wants to be the centre of attention

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Louise Redknapp wants to be the centre of attention

SNAPPING by a stove makes you a nester.

Louise Redknapp, 45, has a strong sense of family, focused around kids, animals and the home. You want to be seen as warm and empathetic.

By displaying Pepsi and cereal, Louise also wants to appear down-to-earth.

Faye says: “White counters and clean lines create a modern look and a simple backdrop makes you centre of attention.”

The beauty wants to be seen as warm by posing in the kitchen

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The beauty wants to be seen as warm by posing in the kitchen
The celeb also poses with Pepsi behind her, which makes her appear down-to-earth

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The celeb also poses with Pepsi behind her, which makes her appear down-to-earth
Faye says: 'A simple backdrop makes you centre of attention'

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Faye says: ‘A simple backdrop makes you centre of attention’
Toaster, £24.99, John Lewis

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Toaster, £24.99, John Lewis

MICHELLE: Great sex life

Michelle Keegan shows off a lot of sheets in her selfies

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Michelle Keegan shows off a lot of sheets in her selfies

FLASHING your sheets like actress Michelle Keegan, 33, is for show-offs.

Inviting strangers to look at your bed is usually a no-go – so it is a smug boast to flaunt crisp, ironed sheets in a spotless room.

It implies you are having great sex with a man who doesn’t leave the bed looking like a pit. The confidence to let others see your bedroom also makes you look like a successful, seductive heroine.

Faye says: “Always pristine, her room of relaxation is no different – light but plush, luxurious and unfussy.”

The actress is confident enough to let others see her bedroom

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The actress is confident enough to let others see her bedroom
Faye says: 'Always pristine, her room of relaxation is no different'

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Faye says: ‘Always pristine, her room of relaxation is no different’
Lisette bedspread, £46.99, wayfair.co.uk

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Lisette bedspread, £46.99, wayfair.co.uk

ROSIE: Chic

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley loves a selfie in her luxurious bathroom

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Rosie Huntington-Whiteley loves a selfie in her luxurious bathroom Credit: Capital Pictures

A CHIC bathroom is the chosen setting for model Rosie ­Huntington- Whiteley, 33.

Faye says: “Her backdrop is slick and expensive-looking. The neutral marble and full-length mirror make any outfit look good.”

Faye says: 'Her backdrop is slick and expensive-looking'

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Faye says: ‘Her backdrop is slick and expensive-looking’Credit: Capital Pictures
Wallpaper, £17, ilovewallpaper.co.uk

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Wallpaper, £17, ilovewallpaper.co.uk

JESY: Wants to impress

Jesy Nelson welcomes her fans into her dining room in numerous selfies

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Jesy Nelson welcomes her fans into her dining room in numerous selfies

LITTLE Mix singer Jesy Nelson, 29, poses in the dining room as the hostess with the mostest. Jesy welcomes her followers like guests.

The chandelier shows a desire to impress but flaunting suggests insecurities.

Faye says: “The rustic table is casual – the light bling. There is a lot going on, which takes the focus off Jesy.”

The singer enjoys showing off her chandelier in order to impress

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The singer enjoys showing off her chandelier in order to impress
Faye says: 'There is a lot going on, which takes the focus off Jesy'

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Faye says: ‘There is a lot going on, which takes the focus off Jesy’
Chandelier, £69, Dunelm

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Chandelier, £69, Dunelm

ROCHELLE: In control

Rochelle Humes loves to be in control

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Rochelle Humes loves to be in control

SINGER and telly host Rochelle Humes, 31, wants to be in control.

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Michelle Obama claims Trump White House doing what she, her husband never could’ve ‘gotten away with’

Former first lady Michelle Obama took a swipe at the Trump White House this week in an episode of “The Michelle Obama Podcast” on Spotify.

Obama claimed she and her husband, former President Barack Obama, faced too much pressure from their “community” to be able to replicate unspecified actions of the Trump administration.

“When we were in the White House, we could’ve never gotten away with some of the stuff that’s going on now,” she said.

“Not because of the public,” she added, “but our community wouldn’t have accepted that. You worked, you did your best every day. You showed up.”

HANSON: MICHELLE OBAMA TOLD DEMS TO ‘GO HIGH’ AFTER HER HUSBAND ‘TRIED TO DESTROY A POLITICAL CAMPAIGN

Obama, 56, was joined on the podcast by her mother, Marian Robinson, 83, and her older brother, Craig Robinson, 58, in a discussion that was mostly about parenting, according to The Hill.

Part of the conversation dealt with interactions between African-Americans and police officers – including an incident from the family’s own experience.

Craig Robinson, an executive director with the National Association of Basketball Coaches, talked about having police once accuse him of stealing his own bicycle when he was a young boy.

Robinson said the incident left him disillusioned because he was “always taught that the police are your friends … and they’ll believe the truth.”

He later claimed that the police officers may have acted differently had they known they’d soon be facing his mother, according to People magazine.

“You know how Mom is,” he said to Michelle. “Mom was like, ‘Go in the house.’ You know how when she’s ready to talk to somebody, she’s like, ‘All right, go in the house.’ And all I could think of was: This dude’s about to get it.”

Michelle Obama added that many people she knows have had “some kind of incident where they were just minding their own business but living Black, and got accused of something.”

She added that many Black families teach their children “you’ve got to be better than, you’ve got to be 10 times better than” others, because of prejudice and mistreatment they will likely face in life.

The former first lady added that such experiences among Blacks help explain the unrest that has erupted across the nation since the May 25 death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

“The fact that there are people out there that treat us less than, when we’re working so hard to be better than, that’s where the pain comes from,” Obama said. “That’s what these young people are so angry about.”

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Earlier this week, some conservatives called on Barack and Michelle Obama to use their connections with the streaming service Netflix to combat the controversial film “Cuties,” which critics say sexualizes and exploits young girls.

The Obamas in 2019 signed a deal said to be worth $50 million to produce content for Netflix, which has been streaming “Cuties.”

Source

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Michelle Obama Never Wanted Malia And Sasha To ‘Resent The Presidency’ While Growing Up In The White House



Malia Obama, Sasha Obama, Michelle Obama are posing for a picture: Michelle Obama opens up about what it was like raising her two daughters while living in the White House.


© Chip Somodevilla – Getty Images
Michelle Obama opens up about what it was like raising her two daughters while living in the White House.

Raising children in any atmosphere is no easy feat. Living in the White House and facing global pressure only increased the challenges, Michelle Obama confirms. The former First Lady opened up about raising daughters Malia, 22 and Sasha, 19 in the spotlight for the season finale of The Michelle Obama Podcast. During the episode, Obama spoke with her mother, Marian Robinson, and older brother, Craig, about what parenting lessons they learned while growing up in Chicago.

Any guidance grasped was naturally modified when the Obama family moved into the White House in 2009.

‘One of the things that I had to learn how to negotiate was creating these boundaries with my kids in the White House,’ Michelle remembered. ‘I mean, you talk about being raised in a totally different world than I ever knew? It’s like, pluckin’ these little girls out of our normal life on the South Side of Chicago with Craig, and mom, and our way of doing things, and our community, and then, putting them in a historic mansion with butlers and maids, and florists, and gardeners, and Secret service, and then trying to make sure that they understood boundaries, understood responsibility.’

Ensuring that Malia and Sasha led a semi-typical adolescence often required string-pulling from Marian, who lived with the family in the White House. ‘You had to basically upend the system of the White House to get them to make sure these girls had some semblance of normalcy, right?’ Obama said, revealing she’d often sneak her granddaughters ‘a little extra candy’.

Obama also recalled maintaining balance in Barack’s schedule, so that their daughters could appreciate their time at the White House, not begrudge it. “I always tried to make sure that I wasn’t pouting in front of the kids when Barack wasn’t there,” she explained, adding, ‘If I had made a big deal out of it and said, “Oh my god, your dad’s not here again! Oh, he’s missing this” or “I just wish…” then that’s the signal to them, “Well this isn’t normal”.’ She continued, ‘Even as Barack being the president of the United States, he worked his schedule around their schedule. They weren’t waiting until 9 o’clock at night to eat because dad was running late. They never couldn’t not go somewhere or do something because of dad. I never wanted them to resent the presidency, or resent what their dad did.’



a person standing in front of Michelle Obama, Barack Obama, Malia Obama posing for the camera: President Obama Holds Election Night Event In Chicago


© Win McNamee – Getty Images
President Obama Holds Election Night Event In Chicago

One milestone almost every family has to endure—dropping their child off at college. Obama reflected on the trip she and Barack took to Harvard for Malia’s freshman year. ‘Barack and I have two different ways of dealing with that anxiety. I just had a list of things to do. I was unpacking the room, we’re making the bed, we’re cleaning, we’re getting the

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Collin Peterson, Michelle Fischbach spar in their first U.S. House debate

Longtime Democratic U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson and his GOP challenger, Michelle Fischbach, agreed in their first debate Thursday that the state’s corona­virus restrictions went too far, but the candidates differed sharply over President Donald Trump’s handling of the pandemic.

Both candidates were asked in a WCCO Radio debate about Trump’s admission in a recorded interview with journalist and author Bob Woodward that he downplayed the gravity of the coronavirus as it began to spread even as he became aware of its gravity.

Fischbach repeatedly said that she had not read the book, which won’t be released until next week. Asked if she listened to the recordings of Trump that were part of this week’s news coverage of the revelation, Fischbach said she hadn’t and insisted that the country’s response to the virus has been “very strong.”

Peterson said the Trump administration could have done more to tell Americans what it knew at the time.

“My question was why, if you knew all this stuff, why would you do this?” Peterson said. “The best thing you can do in a government is level with the people, tell them the truth, give the people some credit. They can handle it.”

Peterson, a centrist Blue Dog Democrat, has represented the largely rural Seventh Congressional District since 1990, even as it went overwhelmingly in President Donald Trump’s favor in 2016. His challenge by Fisch­bach, a former lieutenant governor and state senator, has since been deemed a tossup by multiple election trackers.

As she has since declaring her candidacy last year, Fischbach attempted to link Peterson to what she called the “socialist agenda” of Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. In response, Peterson pointed to his vote against impeaching Trump last year and his stewardship of the influential House Agriculture Committee.

“There isn’t a meeting that goes on in agriculture in Washington that it doesn’t start until I get in the room — and it doesn’t end until I leave,” Peterson said.

Thursday’s 90-minute debate zoomed in on issues key to rural Minnesota: farming, the environment and, as elsewhere, responding to the health and economic effects of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic.

Fischbach is trying to unseat one of Congress’ last remaining Democrats who still manages to net A-plus ratings from the National Rifle Association and opposes abortion.

“Minnesota’s Seventh District deserves a strong conservative voice in Congress, and we need to make sure that rural Minnesota moves forward into the future,” Fisch­bach said.

Peterson insisted, “I do not see myself as a partisan; I see myself as an American.”

Both Peterson and Fischbach argued that Gov. Tim Walz’s emergency restrictions to contain the coronavirus pandemic went too far. Peterson said it made little sense to have some of the same emergency orders in effect in places in rural Minnesota that don’t have the same infection rate as elsewhere and that adjoining states like North and South Dakota have more lax policies. Fischbach called for getting “everything reopened, and we need to make sure it stays

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