Days before Rose Garden ceremony, Mike Pence met with maskless Republicans in Cobb County

Actually, you shouldn’t.

Perdue had made the same claim the previous day in a national radio interview. This weekend, the Georgia Republican Party picked up the accusation in a flyer apparently aimed at suburban women in metro Atlanta.

“Outrageously false,” ruled the Washington Post in a fact-check published this morning. Perdue and other Republicans are basing their claim on an account of the 2017 race for the Sixth District congressional seat that the CPUSA posted on its Facebook page:

“The Communist Party did not endorse him,” said Roberta Wood, a CPUSA board member. “It does not endorse candidates of other political parties.” She added, “Posting an article on Facebook does not mean it is an endorsement.”

The newspaper gave him Four Pinocchios:

“At this point, labeling a Democrat a “communist” is almost worthy of parody. But it’s especially smarmy when the “endorsement” he claims is based on a three-year-old Facebook post of a news article. Perdue should be ashamed of himself — and he should apologize.”

Perdue and super PACs behind his campaign have also relentlessly — and falsely — claimed that Ossoff wants to defund police, even as the Democrat has denied that’s the case. And we recently told you of a Senate Leadership Fund’s out-of-bounds attempt to portray Ossoff as a terrorist sympathizer.

Never mind the polls. This barrage is all the evidence you need that this U.S. Senate race is a tight one.

***

Peach County, Ga., adjacent to both Bibb and Houston counties in middle Georgia, was named as one of 10 bellwether counties to watch on election night in a piece by David Wasserman, an editor at the Cook Political Report. The piece was written for the New York Times:

The population is 52 percent white and 44 percent Black, and its voting is racially polarized. In 2012, Peach County voted by seven points for Mr. Obama. But in 2016, Black turnout dropped sharply, and Mr. Trump won it by three points. Peach County could be a good indicator of whether the addition of Senator Kamala Harris to Mr. Biden’s ticket improves Black turnout.

***

About a month ago, the Georgia Forestry Commission announced that Deputy Director Gary White had been appointed interim director by Gov. Brian Kemp, citing the departure of Director Charles Williams. This morning, the Athens Banner-Herald tells us the rest of the story:

The director of the Georgia Forestry Commission was arrested in August on a shoplifting charge in Jones County, the Athens Banner-Herald learned Monday. The Gray Police Department arrested Charles ‘Chuck’ Williams, 64, of Watkinsville on the misdemeanor charge Aug. 13, the day after the alleged shoplifting took place in the Ace Hardware store in Gray.

***

Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential campaign launched three separate TV ads in Georgia and five other battleground states on Tuesday, aiming to increase turnout among Black voters in his quest to unseat President Donald Trump.

The spots come as polls in Georgia show Biden with about 85% of support

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Donald Trump’s reckless return met with a dramatically changed White House



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


President Donald Trump may be eagerly seeking a return to normal after three nights in the hospital. But the White House he arrived home to Monday with dramatic and reckless flourish has changed drastically since he was airlifted off the South Lawn at the end of last week.

Instead of a bustling hive of pre-election activity, the West Wing has become a breeding ground for viral contagion. At least 11 of the President’s aides or allies have either contracted the virus or — in the case of his daughter Ivanka — are working from home. Entire suites of offices sit vacant as Trump’s aides work to isolate him in the residence and out of the West Wing.

A new aura of mistrust was settling in as several aides raised questions about whether they had been recklessly put in harm’s way over the past week. Accusations of mismanagement — directed mainly at White House chief of staff Mark Meadows — have flown amid one of the gravest presidential crises in a generation. An absence of robust contact tracing efforts caused ripples of concern as testing and mask-wearing norms were being second-guessed.

None of that anxiety was allayed when Trump arrived back to the White House Monday. His first act after striding up the South Portico steps was to rip off his mask and stuff it into his pocket — even though he remains infected with coronavirus and could potentially infect those nearby. He was then seen going back out onto the balcony and re-entering so a camera crew could shoot his entrance.

“We’re going back. We’re going back to work. We’re gonna be out front,” Trump said in a video-taped upon his return. “As your leader I had to do that. I knew there’s danger to it, but I had to do it.”

Though four hours earlier his doctors conceded he was not yet “out of the woods” in his fight against Covid-19, Trump framed the disease as in the past: “Now I’m better and maybe I’m immune? I don’t know. But don’t let it dominate your lives.”

In the White House residence where he was speaking without a mask, an already slimmed-down staff has been reduced even further after the President and first lady both came down with coronavirus. At least one residence staffer in direct contact with the President tested positive over the weekend, according to a person familiar with the matter.

As Trump returned home, a supply of medical gowns, goggles and respirator masks had been secured for use by his health and security teams — and potentially residence staffers — should they need to come into close proximity to the President.

In the hours after he arrived, a White House employee was seen sanitizing the press briefing room wearing a full white suit with a hood, gloves and protective eyewear.

And a temporary suite of offices had been arranged on the ground floor of the executive mansion, adjacent to the White House

Read more

Trump’s reckless return met with a dramatically changed White House



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


President Donald Trump may be eagerly seeking a return to normal after three nights in the hospital. But the White House he arrived home to Monday with dramatic and reckless flourish has changed drastically since he was airlifted off the South Lawn at the end of last week.

Instead of a bustling hive of pre-election activity, the West Wing has become a breeding ground for viral contagion. At least 11 of the President’s aides or allies have either contracted the virus or — in the case of his daughter Ivanka — are working from home. Entire suites of offices sit vacant as Trump’s aides work to isolate him in the residence and out of the West Wing.

A new aura of mistrust was settling in as several aides raised questions about whether they had been recklessly put in harm’s way over the past week. Accusations of mismanagement — directed mainly at White House chief of staff Mark Meadows — have flown amid one of the gravest presidential crises in a generation. An absence of robust contact tracing efforts caused ripples of concern as testing and mask-wearing norms were being second-guessed.

None of that anxiety was allayed when Trump arrived back to the White House Monday. His first act after striding up the South Portico steps was to rip off his mask and stuff it into his pocket — even though he remains infected with coronavirus and could potentially infect those nearby. He was then seen going back out onto the balcony and re-entering so a camera crew could shoot his entrance.

“We’re going back. We’re going back to work. We’re gonna be out front,” Trump said in a video-taped upon his return. “As your leader I had to do that. I knew there’s danger to it, but I had to do it.”

Though four hours earlier his doctors conceded he was not yet “out of the woods” in his fight against Covid-19, Trump framed the disease as in the past: “Now I’m better and maybe I’m immune? I don’t know. But don’t let it dominate your lives.”

In the White House residence where he was speaking without a mask, an already slimmed-down staff has been reduced even further after the President and first lady both came down with coronavirus. At least one residence staffer in direct contact with the President tested positive over the weekend, according to a person familiar with the matter.

As Trump returned home, a supply of medical gowns, goggles and respirator masks had been secured for use by his health and security teams — and potentially residence staffers — should they need to come into close proximity to the President.

In the hours after he arrived, a White House employee was seen sanitizing the press briefing room wearing a full white suit with a hood, gloves and protective eyewear.

And a temporary suite of offices had been arranged on the ground floor of the executive mansion, adjacent to the White House

Read more