Trump returns to White House, state GOP files lawsuit against Pritzker tax amendment and the return of Dark Lord imperial stout



a bottle of wine on a table: Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.


© Gregg Gearhart / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.

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a man talking on a cell phone: Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.


© John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Good morning, Chicago. Illinois public health officials reported Monday 1,853 new known coronavirus cases and 14 additional confirmed deaths. In Chicago, the positivity rate has increased over the last three days: it’s now at 4.4%.

Meanwhile, the CDC updated to its COVID-19 guidelines to say the virus can spread more than 6 feet through the air. Some experts said the updated guidance isn’t enough — here’s why.

Also, a Chicago-area study showed that nearly one-third of coronavirus patients experienced some type of altered state. The neurological symptoms identified ranged from confusion to delirium to unresponsiveness.

Here’s more coronavirus news and other top stories you need to know to start your day.

Trump, after receiving unprecedented level of care, downplays COVID-19 threat and returns to White House — without a mask

President Donald Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House Monday night after leaving the military hospital where he was receiving an unprecedented level of care for COVID-19. He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans — and then he entered the White House without a protective mask.



a man standing next to a tree: Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.

Trump’s message alarmed infectious disease experts and suggested the president’s own illness had not caused him to rethink his often-cavalier attitude toward the disease, which has also infected the first lady and several White House aides, including new cases revealed on Monday.

GOP-aligned group files lawsuit challenging ballot language on Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax amendment

The Illinois Policy Institute, a GOP-aligned group opposed to Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax plan, filed a lawsuit suit Monday contending the explanation of the proposed state constitutional amendment sent to voters was “misleading” and needs court-ordered clarification.



J.B. Pritzker wearing a suit and tie: Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.

The Pritzker-backed Vote Yes for Fairness group backing the proposed amendment called the lawsuit “frivolous” and said it was simply an attempt to gain attention to efforts to

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Peer Lord Bethell heard swearing in House of Lords after suffering tech problems



James Bethell wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a building


© Provided by Evening Standard


A health minister was heard swearing during a House of Lords coronavirus debate after suffering technology problems.

Lord Bethell mumbled “oh for f***’s sake” when his second attempt to deliver a speech on Covid-19 regulations via the internet was disrupted.

The House adjourned for five minutes to see if the technical problems could be resolved but the minister did not fare better on his second attempt.

His final words to the chamber were: “May I say something about local restrictions.

“Over the summer recess we have combined tightening restrictions in areas with outbreaks with the easing of business restrictions…. oh for f***’s sake.”

“Peer heard swearing during coronavirus debate”

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At this point, Lord Bethell cut out and Tory whip Baroness Penn completed his speech.



a room full of people: The peers were discussing Covid regulations at the time of the faux pas (HOL)


© Provided by Evening Standard
The peers were discussing Covid regulations at the time of the faux pas (HOL)

Liberal Democrat health spokeswoman Baroness Jolly later joked: “It’s not always helpful to have a minister with dodgy connections.”

The Government also came under fire from all sides for taking so long to bring forward the regulations for debate given they were implemented in July and August.

They included the reopening of certain types of businesses and £10,000 fines for illegal gatherings of more than 30 people.



James Bethell wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Lord Bethell was plagued with technical issues during a Covid discussion (PA)


© Provided by Evening Standard
Lord Bethell was plagued with technical issues during a Covid discussion (PA)

Conservative former minister Lord Forsyth of Drumlean, contributing virtually, said: “We are witnessing the strange death of parliamentary democracy in this country – there is no other way to describe the charade which we are involved today.

“Many of these regulations, as so many colleagues have pointed out, have long since taken effect. What are we meant to do?

“It’s government by press release… why are we not discussing the rule of six regulations today? This is the issue of the day. Why are we not discussing that?”

Lord Forsyth said the minister did “not have the courtesy to turn up to the House itself” and accused him of not answering questions.

He also added he could not visit his grandchildren in London but they could travel to see him in Scotland.

Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, another Conservative former minister, said: “I very much regret the retrospective nature of this debate.

“It is sad but reflects an all too cavalier attitude to the law which seems to be permeating thinking at present and it needs to stop.”

Non-affiliated peer Lord Mann warned nights drawing in could affect the public mood to new lockdown restrictions.

He said: “Our lockdowns and big wave of the virus was as we came into warm weather, into spring, every night was lighter.

“I put it to Government that the public mood was much easier then than it will be going into winter when every night gets darker, and particularly the effect on children will be quite different when there are no gardens or open spaces that people particularly

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