From ‘Love Island’ to ‘Hell’s Kitchen,’ Caesars Entertainment keeps Las Vegas on TV

Love Island

Robert Voets/CBS Entertainment

The cast of “Love Island” parties on the rooftop of the Cromwell.

If it’s true that everyone’s watching a lot more TV while staying home during the pandemic, viewers across the country are getting plenty of Las Vegas scenery during their favorite shows.

The second season of the U.S. version of dating competition reality series “Love Island” wraps up this week and has seen growing ratings since its premiere on CBS on August 24, according to Variety. Like its U.K. and Australian editions, the show is typically filmed at an actual island destination, with young competitors chasing romance and a big cash prize while attempting to avoid elimination from the voting public or their castmates.

International travel restrictions and other coronavirus concerns threatened to cancel the new season until executives from ITV, producers of “Love Island,” connected with colleagues at Caesars Entertainment in Las Vegas, resulting in the entire production moving to the Strip to be headquartered at the Cromwell. Much of the show has been filmed at the resort’s rooftop Drai’s Beachclub & Nightclub, redecorated to serve as the “Love Island” villa, and just off the Strip, the Rio has served as a secondary production site.

Caesars Entertainment Vice President of Production Kate Whiteley said while “Love Island” in Las Vegas came together quickly, it’s a huge production with 125 people working as cast and crew at the Cromwell and 200 at the Rio.

“It’s been a lot of fun watching it come together and it’s a really big undertaking for us, so we’ve been fortunate to have this partnership with ITV to work together to create a COVID-safe way to do it,” Whiteley said. “There’s a lot of different factors at play beyond Las Vegas because it’s the first big TV show to come back [during the pandemic]. There will be a lot to look at in terms of what it means for the TV industry and the gaming industry, but we’ve been focused on what circles we need to close to make sure everybody’s safe and the impact on the staff at the properties and the people coming in.”

Two other cable shows filmed in Las Vegas have been on the air at the same time, although filming for those programs had mostly wrapped before March’s shutdown on the Strip. The finale of MTV’s “Double Shot at Love” starring “Jersey Shore” favorites Pauly D and Vinny Guadagnino aired September 24 and the show’s second season was shot last fall at the Linq Hotel and Casino and at Drai’s, where Pauly D is a headlining DJ.

And “RuPaul’s Drag Race: Vegas Revue,” a six-episode spinoff of the wildly popular VH1 drag competition series, filmed at the Flamingo in 2019 and 2020 and broadcast its finale on September 25. A behind-the-scenes series focused on the new “RuPaul’s Drag Race Live” production show that opened at the Flamingo Showroom in January was always planned for TV,

Read more

Delays, high costs plague efforts to house LA’s homeless

FILE - This May 21, 2020 file photo shows a homeless encampment on Beaudry Avenue as traffic moves along Interstate 110 in downtown Los Angeles. A $1.2 billion program aimed at building housing for homeless people in Los Angeles has been plagued by delays and soaring costs that have seen the average price of constructing a single unit jump to nearly $559,000, according to a city audit, on Wednesday, Sept. 9.

FILE – This May 21, 2020 file photo shows a homeless encampment on Beaudry Avenue as traffic moves along Interstate 110 in downtown Los Angeles. A $1.2 billion program aimed at building housing for homeless people in Los Angeles has been plagued by delays and soaring costs that have seen the average price of constructing a single unit jump to nearly $559,000, according to a city audit, on Wednesday, Sept. 9.

AP

A $1.2 billion program aimed at building housing for homeless people in Los Angeles has been plagued by delays and soaring costs that have seen the average price of constructing a single unit jump to nearly $559,000, according to a city audit.

Voters passed a 2016 bond measure to help ease the deepening homelessness crisis by creating up to 10,000 housing units over a decade.

Since then, only three new housing projects have been completed and others that are under construction won’t be open for at least two more years, City Controller Ron Galperin said in a report released Wednesday.

“Meanwhile, the crisis has gotten far worse, compounded by pressing COVID-19 health and safety concerns. To truly reduce homelessness as LA voters intended, the city must meet the moment by pivoting to an action plan that will house more people right away. We cannot stay the course when people are dying every day on our streets,” Galperin said in a statement.

Galperin recommends the city shift gears and immediately begin converting hotels and other large buildings into interim shelters to save money and get people off the streets quickly.

Since the last audit in 2019, the average cost of housing projects in development increased from $507,000 per unit to nearly $559,000, the report said. Galperin cited two outlier projects that saw costs spike to nearly $750,000 per unit.

Most of the delays began before the coronavirus pandemic, he found.

A January count by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority reported that there were more than 66,400 homeless people in LA County, with the majority living within the city limits.

Mayor Eric Garcetti’s office didn’t immediately respond Thursday to a request for comment on the city controller’s findings.

The homelessness crisis is visible in downtown Los Angeles, where hundreds of people live in makeshift shanties that line entire blocks in the notorious neighborhood known as Skid Row. Tents regularly pop up on the pavement outside City Hall, and encampments are increasingly found in suburban areas under freeway overpasses.

Source Article

Read more

Delays, high costs plague efforts to house LA’s homeless

Updated


LOS ANGELES (AP) — A $1.2 billion program aimed at building housing for homeless people in Los Angeles has been plagued by delays and soaring costs that have seen the average price of constructing a single unit jump to nearly $559,000, according to a city audit.

Voters passed a 2016 bond measure to help ease the deepening homelessness crisis by creating up to 10,000 housing units over a decade.


Since then, only three new housing projects have been completed and others that are under construction won’t be open for at least two more years, City Controller Ron Galperin said in a report released Wednesday.

“Meanwhile, the crisis has gotten far worse, compounded by pressing COVID-19 health and safety concerns. To truly reduce homelessness as LA voters intended, the city must meet the moment by pivoting to an action plan that will house more people right away. We cannot stay the course when people are dying every day on our streets,” Galperin said in a statement.



Galperin recommends the city shift gears and immediately begin converting hotels and other large buildings into interim shelters to save money and get people off the streets quickly.


Since the last audit in 2019, the average cost of housing projects in development increased from $507,000 per unit to nearly $559,000, the report said. Galperin cited two outlier projects that saw costs spike to nearly $750,000 per unit.

Most of the delays began before the coronavirus pandemic, he found.

A January count by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority reported that there were more than 66,400 homeless people in

Read more