Trump, down for a week with coronavirus, returns to rallying with large White House gathering.

Just over a week since he was hospitalized with Covid-19, President Trump is returning to his beloved rallies.

At 2 p.m., Mr. Trump appeared on a White House balcony and addressed a gathering of conservative activists on the South Lawn. More than 2,000 invitations went out for the event, according to one official.

On Monday, the president will return to must-win Florida for a “Make America Great Again” event at Orlando Sanford International Airport — his first battleground-state rally since testing positive for the virus.

Mr. Trump’s rationale is easy to discern: He is eager to get back into the fray. And, more to the point, he’s hungry for the adulation of his supporters.

But the political wisdom of attending campaign events as a lethal virus ripples through the White House staff is dubious, at best.

Mr. Trump’s insistence since leaving the hospital that Covid-19 was nothing to dwell on and a challenge that can be easily overcome has highlighted the cavalier approach he has taken to the virus for six months. Returning to the campaign trail while the virus might still be working through his system will have the same effect. In an interview on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Friday, Mr. Trump said that he was “medication free.”

But as he trails Joseph R. Biden Jr. in the polls just over three weeks before Election Day, and with millions of votes are already being cast, Mr. Trump will not be denied.

One person familiar with the planning for the White House event said that all attendees would be required to bring and wear a mask, and that they would have to submit to a temperature check and a fill out a questionnaire.

As Mr. Trump prepares to hit the campaign trail again, outside medical experts caution that doing so could pose risks to himself and others. Attendees at the Florida event will be asked to sign a disclaimer stating that “you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to Covid-19.”

Outside medical experts said that resuming public duties might worsen Mr. Trump’s condition, which could still deteriorate in the next several days. Covid-19 patients can take turns for the worse during the second week of illness.

Then there are the potential risks Mr. Trump could pose to others. According to C.D.C. guidelines, people with mild to moderate cases of Covid-19 most likely “remain infectious no longer than 10 days after symptom onset.”

Dr. Sean P. Conley, the White House physician, said on Thursday that Mr. Trump could safely “return to public engagements” on Saturday — a timeline that was questioned by outside experts.

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What large gatherings can teach us about the spread of coronavirus

It’s looking increasingly likely that a Rose Garden event late last month was ground zero for a spate of coronavirus infections spreading among those with close ties to the White House, including President Trump himself.



a group of people jumping in the air


© Provided by CNN


Some 200 people gathered for the nomination ceremony for Judge Amy Coney Barrett on September 26.

So far, at least ten people who attended that event have tested positive for the virus, including the President, the first lady, Sen. Mike Lee from Utah and Sen. Thom Tillis from North Carolina, Trump’s debate sparring partner and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway, megachurch pastor Greg Laurie, and John Jenkins, president of the University of Notre Dame, along with an unnamed journalist. Press secretary Kayleigh McEnany joined the growing list Monday.

Others who recently spent time with people in this group (but did not attend the ceremony) have tested positive too, including Trump adviser Hope Hicks, as well as the Republican National Committee chairwoman, Ronna McDaniel, Trump’s campaign manager, Bill Stepien, and Trump’s assistant, Nicholas Luna.

Even though the ceremony was held outdoors and many attendees were tested before being allowed in, photos and videos of the event show few people wearing masks, many people greeting each other with hugs and handshakes, and people mingling and sitting very closely. If we have learned anything over the last few months, it’s that we should maintain physical distance with other people, keep our contact with them brief, and wear a mask.

But we may not know for a while what the exact consequences of the Rose Garden ceremony are, because it does not appear that the White House is conducting thorough contact tracing. That’s according to reports from attendees of the event, who say they either haven’t been contacted at all or they weren’t asked the questions typically used to document who else may have been exposed through contact.

Rallies paused

Trump’s reluctance to follow these basic public health recommendations has long been a source of concern and consternation for public health experts, doctors, politicians and others — especially because his failure to lead by example might encourage his supporters to follow suit.

Nowhere is this more apparent than at his rallies where thousands of his supporters crowd together, often maskless, to listen to what he has to say.

The President’s illness forced him to postpone two rallies he had planned for last weekend in Wisconsin.

Some local Wisconsin officials may be breathing a sigh of relief. The state is in the middle of a coronavirus surge, according to public health officials, and hosting two large rallies was not at the top of public officials’ wish list.

The mayors of both host cities had asked the President not to come and the governor said Thursday it made no sense for the President to hold rallies in “two of the hottest of hot spots.”

Public health experts agreed.

“The idea of holding a large gathering, which brings in many people

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Trump Infection Puts Large Circle of White House Aides at Risk

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump interacted or traveled with a large coterie of top aides and advisers in the days before he was diagnosed with Covid-19, raising the risk of a widespread outbreak within the White House.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.


© Photographer: MANDEL NGAN/AFP
US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.

The circle of close contacts with the infected president and his wife, Melania, begins with his adviser Hope Hicks, who fell ill on Wednesday night. She traveled with Trump to the presidential debate on Tuesday and to campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday.

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She was seen in close quarters with several other officials, including White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller.

Depending on how far the virus spreads through the halls of the West Wing and Congress, as well as the president’s campaign headquarters, much more than Trump’s travel schedule may be derailed. Face-to-face negotiations over another round of economic stimulus may be complicated, and the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

It wasn’t immediately clear when or how the president was infected and how many other White House aides will be asked to quarantine due to contact with the Trumps or Hicks. The typical incubation period for the virus, or time between exposure and emergence of symptoms, is thought to be two to five days.

It is possible, if not likely, the president was infected before Wednesday, when Hicks started exhibiting signs of illness.

Ronny Jackson, the president’s former White House physician, told Fox News early Friday morning that the positive test would “affect everybody who has been around the president” as they would likely need to self-isolate. He cautioned that it’s not yet clear how widely the virus has circulated. Even though Hicks tested positive, “that doesn’t mean that’s the person he got it from,” Jackson told Fox.

“Contract tracing is being done and the appropriate notifications and recommendations will be made,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement.

Early Wednesday, Trump met with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to discuss negotiations over a virus relief package, according to Mnuchin.

Later that day, Trump set off for Minnesota for a fundraiser and rally. Hicks was aboard Marine One, the presidential helicopter, when it departed the White House for Joint Base Andrews, where Air Force One lands.

Joining her on the helicopter, along with Trump, were the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kusner; social media director Dan Scavino; the president’s body man, Nick Luna; and adviser Stephen Miller.

Meadows and White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany joined the president’s entourage on Air Force One. Meadows was seen chatting with Kushner on the tarmac in Minneapolis, and during the return flight, the chief of staff came back to the press cabin to speak with reporters.

On Tuesday, Meadows attended a meeting on Capitol Hill with

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Trump Infection Puts Large Retinue of White House Aides at Risk

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump interacted or traveled with a large coterie of top aides and advisers in the days before he was diagnosed with Covid-19, raising the risk of a widespread outbreak within the White House.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.


© Photographer: MANDEL NGAN/AFP
US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.

The circle of close contacts with the infected president and his wife, Melania, begins with his adviser Hope Hicks, who fell ill on Wednesday night. She traveled with Trump to the presidential debate on Tuesday and to campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday.

She was seen in close quarters with several other officials, including White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller.

Depending on how far the virus spreads through the halls of the West Wing and Congress, as well as the president’s campaign headquarters, much more than Trump’s travel schedule may be derailed. Face-to-face negotiations over another round of economic stimulus may be complicated, and the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

It wasn’t immediately clear when or how the president was infected and how many other White House aides will be asked to quarantine due to contact with the Trumps or Hicks. The typical incubation period for the virus, or time between exposure and emergence of symptoms, is thought to be two to five days.

It is possible, if not likely, the president was infected before Wednesday, when Hicks started exhibiting signs of illness.

Ronny Jackson, the president’s former White House physician, told Fox News early Friday morning that the positive test would “affect everybody who has been around the president” as they would likely need to self-isolate. He cautioned that it’s not yet clear how widely the virus has circulated. Even though Hicks tested positive, “that doesn’t mean that’s the person he got it from,” Jackson told Fox.

“Contract tracing is being done and the appropriate notifications and recommendations will be made,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement.

Early Wednesday, Trump met with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to discuss negotiations over a virus relief package, according to Mnuchin.

Later that day, Trump set off for Minnesota for a fundraiser and rally. Hicks was aboard Marine One, the presidential helicopter, when it departed the White House for Joint Base Andrews, where Air Force One lands.

Joining her on the helicopter, along with Trump, were the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kusner; social media director Dan Scavino; the president’s body man, Nick Luna; and adviser Stephen Miller.

Meadows and White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany joined the president’s entourage on Air Force One. Meadows was seen chatting with Kushner on the tarmac in Minneapolis, and during the return flight, the chief of staff came back to the press cabin to speak with reporters.

On Tuesday, Meadows attended a meeting on Capitol Hill with Barrett

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Crenshaw looms large as Democrats look to flip Texas House seat

Democrats hoping to turn Texas blue see a tempting — if formidable — target in freshman Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawSecond night of GOP convention outdraws Democrats’ event with 19.4 million viewers GOP sticks to convention message amid uproar over Blake shooting The Hill’s Convention Report: Mike and Karen Pence set to headline third night of convention MORE (R).

Crenshaw’s seat is one of several in Texas Democrats are contesting this cycle, and the party is bullish that the 2nd District — and the state at large — are in play. But while several other Democratic House contenders are either competing for open seats or in districts with lesser-known incumbents, the party could face headwinds trying to unseat a rising GOP star in Crenshaw, who has been cast as a future Republican thought leader. 

On paper, the 2nd District is similar to other areas where Democrats saw massive gains in the 2018 midterms. It has a high number of college graduates, it includes parts of a major city — Houston — and the surrounding suburbs and about 44 percent of adults there are either Black or Hispanic, two demographics that lean Democratic.

But in 2018, as Democrats captured the House, they lost an open race to Crenshaw by more than 7 points. And the former Navy SEAL and combat veteran is running for reelection with a campaign account of over $4 million and a mushrooming national profile.

Democrats have thrown their support behind Sima Ladjevardian, a prominent Houston attorney and health care activist who fled Iran as a child, survived cancer and advised former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s 2018 Senate campaign, setting her up to run as a candidate with a compelling life story who reflects the growing diversity of the Houston area and Texas at large. 

“I want somebody who cares and can give back and can represent the people of the community, and I’m the person to take him out,” Ladjevardian said in an interview. “It’s my duty for a country that’s taken care of me to give back and make sure I do that.”

Democrats see promising signs that the district could be moving in their direction.

While Crenshaw won in 2018 by a healthy margin, O’Rourke lost there by just 1 point the same year. The party has also been able to narrow the margins in presidential races — the district went for the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAnalysis: Biden victory, Democratic sweep would bring biggest boost to economy The Memo: Trump’s strengths complicate election picture Mark Kelly: Arizona Senate race winner should be sworn in ‘promptly’ MORE (R-Ariz.) by 20 points in 2008 and now-Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump ‘no longer angry’ at Romney because of Supreme Court stance GOP lawmakers distance themselves from Trump comments on transfer of power McConnell pushes back on Trump: ‘There will be an orderly transition’ MORE (R-Utah) by 27 points in 2012, but President TrumpDonald John TrumpSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence

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YouTube pranksters draw large maskless crowd, get kicked out of ‘Jersey Shore’ house in Seaside Heights

Every Monday night, the Nelk Boys post a new video, sharing their latest exploits with their 5.7 million followers on YouTube.

These video usually involve some kind of stunt, prank and merchandise “drop.” Their appearances have been known to draw crowds, even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Now they’ve brought their frat act to the Jersey Shore.

After the YouTube personalities teased they would be at the Shore Monday — staying in Seaside Heights at the “Jersey Shore” house made popular by the MTV reality show — fans showed up en masse, forming a maskless crowd.

The Nelk Boys shared clips from their Shore trip on Instagram and Twitter — in one, they spray some celebratory bubbly in front of the house’s famous Italian flag-painted garage — as locals posted video of the scene on social media. Police were on hand for crowd control, and the gathering outside the Shore house seemed to grow larger as the night wore on.

Seaside Heights Police Chief Thomas Boyd told the Asbury Park Press that officers were performing “crowd control” and as of 8:30 p.m. the situation remained peaceful and under control. Boyd estimated the crowd had grown to a “couple thousand.”

Later Monday, videos on social media showed rowdier crowds.

Caution: social media posts below contain profanity.

Danny Merk, known to “Jersey Shore” fans as the employer of the cast at the Shore Store, appeared to kick the Nelk Boys out of the Shore house.

“Get your sh-t and get outta here, guys,” Merk, the landlord, told them in one video, filmed inside the house at 1209 Boardwalk. “It’s time to go.”

“Danny let them stay!!!” said “Jersey Shore” star Paul “DJ Pauly D” DelVecchio in a comment on the Instagram video.

“Hope you didn’t leave my room a mess!!!” said his co-star, Vinny Guadagnino.

The Nelk Boys, who hail from Canada, are Gen Zers Jesse Sebastiani, Kyle Forgeard and Steve Deleonardis. The trio, who lived in Los Angeles before they set off on travels across the country, are known for their visits to college campuses.

Last week, YouTube temporarily “demonetized” them after they allegedly threw parties at Illinois State University, creating a “public health risk,” BuzzFeed reported. Video they shared on Instagram showed students at on-campus parties not wearing masks or social distancing.

The Nelk Boys previously pulled a stunt in which they protested COVID-19 restrictions in Los Angeles, leading a crowd in an “open the gyms” chant.

Their latest video, posted two hours ago, claims nearly half a million views on YouTube. The installment is a compilation of various trips and pranks that starts at the Shore house and documents them getting kicked out of the parking lot of a Trump rally a few days ago.

The Nelk Boys and their Nelk associates use their appearances to hawk their Full Send merchandise, which includes a variety of basketball and baseball jerseys and hoodies.

They provide updates along the way for their 3.6 million Instagram followers and 381,000 Twitter followers.

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They knew they had COVID-19, but some college students threw a large house party anyway


It stands to reason you probably wouldn’t throw a large house party if you tested positive for COVID-19. But that wasn’t the case for some students at Miami University of Ohio.

When Oxford police arrived to break up a large house party hosted by students over Labor Day weekend, officers discovered one student had tested positive for COVID-19 and been ordered to quarantine a week prior. Bodycam video from the Oxford Police Department shows several students sitting on the porch, unmasked, drinking and listening to music, according to report from WOIO.


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“How many people are in the house? Twenty people inside? You might want to start clearing out, please,” one officer ordered the students.

After running one student’s identification, an officer calls him over.



“I’ve never seen this before, there’s an input on the computer that said you tested positive for COVID?” The officer asked the student. The student then informed the officer that everyone at the party has coronavirus.

“How many other people have COVID?” the officer asked.

“They all do,” the student answered, gesturing to other roommates.


After the incident, police fined the six men in the house and a guest $500 each.

“This particular case is egregious, but

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British Teen Fined Over $12,000 For Hosting Large House Party, Apologizes To Neighbors

KEY POINTS

  • The teenager hosted a party with more than 50 guests in violation of restrictions on social gatherings in the U.K.
  • The cops allegedly gave the teen an initial warning to shut down the party but he “deliberately flouted” the rules
  • The number of coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom as of Monday was 368,504

A British teenager who was fined £10,000 ($12,823 USD) for hosting a large house party amid the coronavirus pandemic has apologized to his neighbors.

The 19-year-old host was given the penalty notice after police found more than 50 attendees at the Sept. 11 party at his home in Lenton, Nottinghamshire. The teen will have to appear before a court if he fails to pay the penalty or decides to contest it, Nottinghamshire Live reported.

Nottinghamshire police said officers from the Nottingham City Council were alerted of the party by the residents in the neighborhood. The police who responded to the house were met with “hostility from the organizer”. They had reportedly given him an initial warning to shut down the party but the department said he had “deliberately flouted” the rules. The cops then ordered all the guests to leave the party. 

The unidentified teenager sent a letter to his neighbors over the weekend, calling the party a “foolish gathering” and apologizing for the “major lapse of judgment,” the BBC reported.

The host reportedly wrote in the letter the party was held to celebrate two housemates recently turning 21 and was meant for just 25 people, complying with the country’s COVID-19 restrictions.

“However, it quickly became out of hand,” he wrote. “It was never our intention to disrupt your evening. It was a major lapse in judgement (sic) on our end. We are eager to make amends.”

The teenager was fined days before a new rule came into effect amid a rise in coronavirus cases.

Steve Cooper, assistant chief constable with Nottinghamshire Police, said under the previous rules anyone hosting house parties with more than 30 people would face a hefty fine and that the officers were ready to exert “full powers” against those who “deliberately put other people’s lives in danger.”

“We need to all remember we are very much still in the middle of a global pandemic and we all need to take responsibility for our actions,” the Nottinghamshire Live quoted Cooper as saying.

Beginning Monday, social gatherings throughout the United Kingdom are limited to six people. The new rule enables authorities to issue a hefty fine to violators. Officers hoped the Friday incident would serve as an early warning to those thinking of hosting large parties.

The “rule of six” restriction follows Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies member and former chief scientific adviser Sir Mark Walport’s warning that the U.K. is “on the edge of losing control of coronavirus,” BBC reported. Total cases of infection in the country, as of Monday, is 368,504, with the death tally reaching 41,628, according to the data from Worldometer.

party-2545168_1920 COVID-19 infected 18 members of a

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Ohio Students Hosting Large House Party Admits to Police They ‘All’ Tested Positive for COVID

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, students from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio threw a house party during Labor Day weekend which ignored school and city rules requiring masks, social distancing and gatherings no larger than 10 people.



A photo illustration of a policeman questioning a young person at a house.


© kzenon/Getty
A photo illustration of a policeman questioning a young person at a house.

When police arrived at the house on Saturday at 4:05 p.m., they discovered seven young men sitting on the porch, drinking and listening to music without masks. A total of 20 people were at the gathering. One house resident confirmed to police that he had recently tested positive for COVID-19.

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When asked whether he was supposed to be in quarantine, the student responded, “Yeah, that’s why I’m at my house,” and then claimed that everyone else in attendance had tested positive for COVID-19 as well.

“That’s what we’re trying to prevent,” the officer told the student. “We want to keep this town open. You’re not quarantining if you’re mixing with other people.”

Although students in the house began to leave as soon as police arrived, police ended up fining six men—five house residents and one visitor—$500 each for violating city ordinances forbidding gatherings of more than 10 people, a precaution to prevent a possible COVID-19 outbreak.

One of the residents fined by police claimed that the party guests simply showed up without being invited, but the police officer declined to discuss that claim further calling it “an argument for another day.”

Miami University officials told CBS News that any students found violating city COVID-19 ordinances could face disciplinary action under the Code of Student Conduct, including possible suspension or dismissal.

According to Cleveland.com, more than 1,000 Miami University students have tested positive for COVID-19 during the past two weeks. The school will resume in-person classes on September 21 with roughly 40 percent of the school’s nearly 20,000 students learning remotely online.

Newsweek contacted Miami University for comment.

Other universities have struggled to keep students from partying in defiance of rules meant to prevent coronavirus epidemics.

In late August, Ohio State University issued 228 interim suspensions for individuals and student organizations who attended or hosted large parties and gatherings in the university district.

Around the same time, Florida State University police arrested and charged seven students associated with the disbanded Alpha Tau Omega fraternity for hosting an “open house party.”

On September 10, Illinois State University said it was considering consequences for students who attended a 200-person “pop-up” party hosted by The Nelk Boys, a group of college-aged pranksters with nearly 5.7 million YouTube followers.

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The House, red states, large employers rejecting Trump payroll-tax holiday

  • The US House became the latest employer to spurn Trump’s payroll-tax holiday, which is now in effect until December 31.
  • The lower chamber joins several large companies and at least two red states in rebuffing the directive, citing difficulties around carrying out the deferral and the prospect of getting stuck with large tax bills.
  • “The fact that few employers would take this up was totally foreseeable — the scheme just didn’t work,” tax expert Seth Hanlon told Business Insider.
  • Trump said he would forgive payroll taxes if he is re-elected, but that requires Congress to act.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The House of Representatives on Friday became the latest employer to reject President Donald Trump’s payroll-tax deferral for its employees.

It joins several large companies and some red states that have already spurned the measure. The sparse involvement from employers threatens to inflict a heavy blow on a measure the Trump administration touted as an effective way to get money to households and boost spending.

In an email to employees, the House’s Chief Administrative Officer Philip Kiko said the lower chamber “determined that implementing the deferral would not be in the best interests of the House or our employees.”

It continued: “As a result, we will not implement the payroll tax deferral.”

Rep. Kevin Brady, a top Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee, announced on Thursday he was deferring the tax for some of his staff, according to the Wall Street Journal’s Richard Rubin. Brady’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

“The fact that few employers would take this up was totally foreseeable”

Last month, Trump signed an executive order to implement a payroll-tax holiday through December 31. Employees earning under $4,000 every two weeks — or below $104,000 yearly — won’t have to pay the 6.2% tax out of their paychecks, which is used to fund Social Security.

Employers can choose whether they want to defer the tax payment. But its not waived since it requires Congress to step in.

Trump’s directive has triggered significant criticism from business groups and tax experts. Several large employers have rebuffed taking part in the holiday, such as CVS Health, United Parcel Service, Home Depot, and JP Morgan Chase, The Wall Street Journal reported.

“It’s needless complication for virtually no benefit for employees and a lot of risk on employers,” Seth Hanlon, a senior fellow at the left-leaning Center for American progress, told Business Insider. “The fact that few employers would take this up was totally foreseeable — the scheme just didn’t work.”

At least two states with Republican governors — Indiana and Arizona — have opted out of the plan, per The Washington Post. So far, the federal government is implementing the tax holiday for federal workers, active US troops, and civilian contractors within the Defense Department — none of whom can opt out.

Federal guidance says that participating employers have to recoup the money by collecting the Social Security levy twice from

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