U.S. House Judiciary antitrust report likely to come out as soon as Monday Oct. 5 – source

FILE PHOTO: The logos of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google in a combination photo from Reuters files/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee is expected to release a much-anticipated report into antitrust allegations against four of America’s largest tech companies as soon as Monday, according to a source with direct knowledge of the matter.

The chief executives of four of the world’s largest tech companies, Amazon.com Inc, Facebook Inc, Apple and Alphabet’s Google, testified before the panel in July.

During the hearing, the four CEOs parried a range of accusations that they crippled smaller rivals in their quest for market share. The four companies have a combined market value of about $5 trillion.

The House antitrust subcommittee plans to hold a hearing on Friday on proposals to strengthen antitrust laws and restore online competition as it nears the release of this long-awaited report on Big Tech.

The date of release of the report can still be moved, the source said.

The U.S. Justice Department is also probing the big four tech platforms. Facebook and Amazon are also facing inquiries by the Federal Trade Commission, while U.S. states attorneys general are looking at Facebook and Google.

Reporting by Nandita Bose; Editing by Sandra Maler and Leslie Adler

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U.S. House Judiciary antitrust report likely to come out as soon as Monday October 5: source

FILE PHOTO: The logos of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google in a combination photo from Reuters files

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee is expected to release a much-anticipated report into antitrust allegations against four of America’s largest tech companies as soon as Monday, according to a source with direct knowledge of the matter.

The chief executives of four of the world’s largest tech companies, Amazon.com Inc, Facebook Inc, Apple and Alphabet’s Google, testified before the panel in July.

During the hearing, the four CEOs parried a range of accusations that they crippled smaller rivals in their quest for market share. The four companies have a combined market value of about $5 trillion.

The House antitrust subcommittee plans to hold a hearing on Friday on proposals to strengthen antitrust laws and restore online competition as it nears the release of this long-awaited report on Big Tech.

The date of release of the report can still be moved, the source said.

The U.S. Justice Department is also probing the big four tech platforms. Facebook and Amazon are also facing inquiries by the Federal Trade Commission, while U.S. states attorneys general are looking at Facebook and Google.

Reporting by Nandita Bose; Editing by Sandra Maler and Leslie Adler

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Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court, setting up battle over judiciary

Trump hailed Barrett as “a woman of remarkable intellect and character,” saying he had studied her record closely before making the pick.

“I looked and I studied, and you are very eminently qualified,” he said as Barrett stood next to him in the Rose Garden.

An ideological heir to the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, Barrett would fill the seat vacated after the Sept. 18 death of liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in what would be the sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replaced Justice Thurgood Marshall nearly three decades ago. She would be the sixth justice on the nine-member court to be appointed by a Republican president, and the third of Trump’s first term in office.

For Trump, whose 2016 victory hinged in large part on reluctant support from conservative and white evangelicals on the promise of filling Scalia’s seat with a conservative, the latest nomination in some ways brings his first term full circle. Even before Ginsburg’s death, Trump was running on having confirmed in excess of 200 federal judges, fulfilling a generational aim of conservative legal activists.

“This is my third such nomination after Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh, and it is a very proud moment indeed,” Trump said in the Rose Garden.

The set design, with large American flags hung between the Rose Garden colonnades, appeared to be modeled on the way the White House was decorated when President Bill Clinton named Ginsburg as his nominee in 1993.

The announcement came before Ginsburg was buried beside her husband next week at Arlington National Cemetery. On Friday, she was the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol, and mourners flocked to the Supreme Court for two days before that to pay respects.

Within hours of Ginsburg’s death, Trump made clear he would nominate a woman for the seat, and later volunteered he was considering five candidates. But Barrett was the early favorite, and the only one to meet with Trump.

Barrett has been a judge since 2017, when Trump nominated her to the Chicago-based 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. But as a longtime University of Notre Dame law professor, she had already established herself as a reliable conservative in the mold of Scalia, for whom she clerked in the late 1990s.

She would be the only justice on the current court not to have received her law degree from an Ivy League school. The eight current justices all attended either Harvard or Yale.

The staunch conservative had become known to Trump in large part after her bitter 2017 appeals court confirmation on a party-line vote included allegations that Democrats were attacking her Catholic faith. The president also interviewed her in 2018 for the vacancy created by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, but Trump ultimately chose Brett Kavanaugh.

Trump and his political allies are itching for another fight over Barrett’s faith, seeing it as a political windfall that would backfire on Democrats. Catholic voters in Pennsylvania, in particular, are viewed as a pivotal demographic

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GOP members of House Judiciary Committee demand Nadler condemn Antifa

Four Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee sent a letter on Tuesday to Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-NY., criticizing him for launching “fruitless partisan investigations” into President Trump while ignoring the threat of Antifa.

The letter, which was penned by ranking member Rep.  Jim Jordan of Ohio and Reps. Ken Buck, R-Co., Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wisc., and Mike Johnson, R-La., calls on Nadler to denounce “left-wing violent extremism” and convene a hearing to investigate the unrest engulfing a number of cities across the country.

“You have wasted the first 20 months of your chairmanship on fruitless partisan investigations in furtherance of your obsession with attacking President Trump,” the lawmakers said in their letter. “We urge you not to waste any more time. The jurisdiction of the Judiciary Committee provides you with a unique authority to condemn the violence and disorder in Democrat-run cities.”

BIDEN CONDEMNS RIOTING, BLASTS TRUMP’S RESPONSE IN FIERY POST-CONVENTION SPEECH

Trump and his Republican allies have roundly blamed Antifa, a shadowy left-wing, self-described anti-fascist movement, for much of the unrest and violence in cities like Portland, Ore. Democrats in Congress, however, have sought to draw a distinction between those protesting over racial inequality and police brutality and the looting and violence that has followed some the protests.

Nadler drew sharp criticism from conservatives back in July when he told writer-produce Austen Fletcher that Antifa is “myth that’s being spread only in Washington, D.C.”

“Prominent Democrat leaders look the other way on lawlessness and disorder,” Jordan and his fellow GOP lawmakers wrote. “Even you, the chairman of the powerful Judiciary Committee with a unique platform to denounce left-wing violence, have trivialized it as ‘imaginary’ and a ‘myth.’”

While Nadler and other Democrats have remained relatively quiet on Antifa, the party’s presidential nominee, Joe Biden, issued his most forceful condemnation of the movement on Monday.

Speaking to a local news station in Pennsylvania, Biden said he condemns violence “across the board,” including from Antifa.

“I’ve condemned it across the board,” Biden told Pennsylvania’s WGAL News 8 in an interview Monday, referring to violence during protests. “The president still hasn’t condemned the far-right folks coming out and protesting and using violence.”

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“Do you condemn Antifa?” reporter Barbara Barr asked Biden.

“Yes, I do, violence no matter who it is,” he replied.

The nationwide unrest was sparked by the late May death of George Floyd while in the custody of police in Minnesota.

Trump, who has denounced protesters as “thugs” while sharply defending the police, has throughout the summer cast American cities under liberal leadership as under siege by violent and lawless anarchy.

While many of the demonstrations have been peaceful, rioting and looting has broken out in multiple cities.

Fox News’ Evie Fordham contributed to this report.

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