The Block stars Jimmy and Tam defend decision to spend $5000 on high-end WINE during kitchen week

The Block stars Jimmy and Tam defend decision to spend $5000 on high-end WINE during kitchen week

The Block’s Jimmy and Tam spent a whopping $5000 on high-end wine to hopefully tempt prospective buyers come auction day.

On Wednesday’s episode, bar manager Tam, 31, shocked foreman Dan by announcing that she’d splashed the large amount of cash on the luxury booze.

Speaking to 9Entertainment, Tam explained why the wine will only add further value to their $200,000 kitchen.

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The Block stars Jimmy and Tam (pictured) have defended their decision to spend $5000 on high-end WINE to hopefully tempt prospective buyers come auction day

The Block stars Jimmy and Tam (pictured) have defended their decision to spend $5000 on high-end WINE to hopefully tempt prospective buyers come auction day

Judge Shaynna Blake initially suggested Tam invest in a rare art piece for their house as a ‘game changer’ for auction day, but Tam instead spent $5000 on rare wines for their state-of-the-art bar fridge.

‘I knew we had this amazing Gaggenau wine fridge and I wanted something that was pretty high end to go in the fridge to meet the standards,’ she said.

‘The wine that has been selected, it’s actually from the most prestigious real estate areas around the world,’ explained Tam, adding: ‘Anyone who knows wine, when they see what’s in the wine selection, they’re blown away.’ 

'Anyone who knows wine will be blown away': Speaking to 9Entertainment , Tam claimed the wine will only add further value to their $200,000 kitchen

‘Anyone who knows wine will be blown away’: Speaking to 9Entertainment , Tam claimed the wine will only add further value to their $200,000 kitchen

Bold move: Judge Shaynna Blake (pictured) suggested Tam invest in a rare art piece for their house as a 'game changer' for auction day, but Tam instead spent $5000 on rare wines

Bold move: Judge Shaynna Blake (pictured) suggested Tam invest in a rare art piece for their house as a ‘game changer’ for auction day, but Tam instead spent $5000 on rare wines

Tam claims the wine is both a luxury good and an investment for whoever decided to purchase the finished Block property at auction.

She believes the curated wine that was purchased during filming will appreciate by 10 per cent each year.  

There are 55 bottles of wine in the collection, with the most expensive in the assortment being a $278 Massolino Barolo MAGNUM 2015.

‘It’s [the bar fridge] actually got three different sections in it. There’s a white wine, a red wine and a champagne. So each section can run at different temperatures and the temperature is perfect for that sort of wine, which is next level,’ said Tam.   

INSIDE JIMMY AND TAM’S $5000 WINE FRIDGE ON THE BLOCK

Henschke Mt Edelston Shiraz 2010* ($180.00 ea.) x 2 | $360.00

Henri Boillot Bourgogne Blanc 2018* ($56.00 ea.) x 6 | $336.00

Penfolds St Henri Shiraz 1996* ($150.00 ea.) x 2 | $300.00

Penfolds St Henri Shiraz 1998* ($145.00 ea.) x 2 | $290.00

Penfolds St Henri Shiraz 2005* ($105.00 ea) x 2 | $210.00

Massolino Barolo 2015* ($80.00 ea.) x 7 | $560.00

Mount Mary Chardonnay* ($88.00 ea.) x 6 | $528.00

Duplessis AC Chablis 2018* ($50.00 ea.) x 6 | $300.00

Donhoff GG Riesling* ($110.00 ea.) x 3 | $330.00

Donnhoff Tonschiefer Reisling 2016* ($40.00

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The Block Jimmy and Tam’s bathroom was missing one feature but still led them to victory

Can you spot what’s wrong with this Block bathroom? See inside the dreamy pastel pink and gold en suite that lead to Jimmy and Tam’s victory… but there was one thing missing

The Block’s Jimmy and Tam came first for their master en suite on Sunday night.

A dreamy pink and gold bathroom led to the married couple scoring 29 points from the judges, leaving them tied for first with Luke and Jasmin. 

But Jimmy and Tam’s room was missing one feature that all the other contestants included, which almost led to their undoing. 

Can you spot what's wrong with this Block bathroom? See inside the dreamy pastel pink and gold en suite that lead to Jimmy and Tam's victory... but there was one thing missing

Can you spot what’s wrong with this Block bathroom? See inside the dreamy pastel pink and gold en suite that lead to Jimmy and Tam’s victory… but there was one thing missing

Judge Darren Palmer noted that a bathtub was missing during the episode.  

‘That has come because of the size and the floor space they have allocated to this bathroom,’ he said.

But Shaynna Blaze said the bathroom was still sufficient for a couple despite its smaller size.  

‘If we didn’t have the others to compare to, I would say this is absolutely a perfect size for a couple,’ she said. 

‘I, as a buyer, would prefer a big walk-in robe as opposed to a bath in my master en suite because I can have a bath in the other area.’

It's a bathtub! Judge Darren Palmer noted that Jimmy and Tam's bathroom did not have a bathtub, while all of the other master en suites did

It’s a bathtub! Judge Darren Palmer noted that Jimmy and Tam’s bathroom did not have a bathtub, while all of the other master en suites did

Jimmy and Tam included a bath in their upstairs bathroom, so they still have at least one in their build. 

Meanwhile, the en suite featured white terrazzo floor tiles and statement pink wall tiles, which was praised by the judges.    

There was also a gold shower head and tapware, which added a vintage 50s flair.   

‘I’ve got to say the colour palette, which they are using all the way through, is divine,’ Shaynna said.  

Pink is the new pink! The bathroom featured white terrazzo floor tiles and statement pink wall tiles, which was praised by the judges. There was also a gold shower head and tapware, which added a vintage 50s flair

Pink is the new pink! The bathroom featured white terrazzo floor tiles and statement pink wall tiles, which was praised by the judges. There was also a gold shower head and tapware, which added a vintage 50s flair

But Shaynna and co-judge Neale Whitaker were both critical of the lighting in the bathroom, which led to them loosing some points. 

‘The one thing I would mention is the choice of light there, that little sconce is a bit disappointing,’ Neale said.

Meanwhile Shaynna said it was ‘not a good lighting plan’. 

Overall, the positives outweighed the criticisms and the couple were able to take home 29 points and a tied first place position. 

The Block continues on Channel Nine at 7pm on Monday. 

Victory! Overall, the positives outweighed the criticisms, and the couple were able to take home 29 points and a tied first place position

Victory! Overall, the positives outweighed the criticisms, and the couple were able to take home 29 points and a tied first place position

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Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof



Willie Nelson looking at the camera: Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof


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Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof

Former President Jimmy Carter reveals in a new documentary that his son James Earl “Chip” Carter sat on the roof of the White House and smoked marijuana with country music legend Willie Nelson.

People magazine reports that Carter made the admission in a new documentary, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President.” Carter confirmed the anecdote described in Nelson’s autobiography, though Nelson had hid the identity of Carter’s son in the book in which he referred to his companion as a “servant” in the White House.

“When Willie Nelson wrote his autobiography, he confessed that he smoked pot in the White House one night when he was spending the night with me,” Carter says, according to People. “And he says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants in the White House. That is not exactly true – it actually was one of my sons, which he didn’t want to categorize as a pot-smoker like him.”

Carter famously made political alliances with many well-known musicians during his White House tenure, including Nelson and the Allman Brothers. In the documentary, he reportedly also dismissed criticism of his meetings with musical groups, pointing to the influence such groups had over their fans.

“I was doing what I really believed, and the response I think from the followers of those musicians was much more influential than the people who thought [of] that being inappropriate for a president,” Carter says, according to People.

Nelson is an outspoken advocate for left-leaning causes and in 2018 supported former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D) in his Senate bid against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

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Jimmy Carter reveals Willie Nelson’s White House pot-smoking pal: ‘One of my sons’

Jimmy Carter has set the record straight about who joined Willie Nelson in smoking pot on the roof of the White House during Carter’s presidency.

It wasn’t a White House staffer member, it was one of Carter’s sons.

“When Willie Nelson wrote his autobiography, he confessed that he smoked pot in the White House one night when he was spending the night with me,” Carter, 95, says in the new documentary, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President” released Friday, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“And he says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants in the White House. That is not exactly true — it actually was one of my sons, which he didn’t want to categorize as a pot-smoker like him.”

The documentary explores the Democrat’s relationships with several musicians, including Bob Dylan and the Allman Brothers, during his time in the White House, 1977-1981.

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Former President Jimmy Carter and country singer Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)

Former President Jimmy Carter and country singer Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)

“I was doing what I really believed, and the response I think from the followers of those musicians was much more influential than the people who thought [of] that being inappropriate for a president,” he said, according to the Times.

‘Big fat Austin torpedo’

In 2015, Carter’s son, James Earl “Chip” Carter III — now 70 years old — admitted to GQ that Nelson “told me not to ever tell anybody” about the incident involving what the “On the Road Again” singer has called a “big fat Austin torpedo.”

For the documentary, Carter III said he and Nelson headed upstairs during a break while the singer had been jamming at the White House in the summer of 1980, according to the New York Post.

“I said, ‘Let’s go upstairs.’ We just kept going up ’til we got to the roof, where we leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up,” he said. “If you know Washington, the White House is the hub of the spokes, the way it was designed. Most of the avenues run into the White House. You could sit up and could see all the traffic coming right at you. It’s a nice place up there.”

“We leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up.”

— James Earl “Chip” Carter III, son of Jimmy Carter

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The other children of Carter and former first lady Rosalynn Carter are Jack Carter, 73; Donnel Carter, 68; and Amy Carter, 52.

The former president’s health has been ailing recently but he managed to make a virtual appearance to endorse Joe Biden for president last month.

Carter is the oldest living ex-president.

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Jimmy Carter is fully aware his son smoked with Willie Nelson on the White House roof


The top of many a Texan’s bucket list: Sharing a smoke with country icon (and profound marijuana fan) Willie Nelson.

Make it happen on the White House roof, and that’s the stuff of legend.

Former president Jimmy Carter talks about the time one of his sons had that exact experience in the new documentary about his presidency, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President.”

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According to the Los Angeles Time, Carter says in the film that Nelson “says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants at the White House. That is not exactly true. It actually was one of my sons.”

The documentary explores President Carter’s love of music and his friendship with several musicians during his term.



Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images) Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images

Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images


Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)


This isn’t the first time it’s been confirmed that James “Chip” Earl Carter III and Nelson shared “a big fat Austin torpedo” during Nelson’s visit to the White House in 1980. In a 2015 interview with GQ, when asked if it was Chip Carter that Nelson shared that legendary joint with, Nelson says; “Looked a lot like. Could have been, yeah.”




“Well, he told me not to ever tell anybody,” Chip Carter said in the same article.

Thankfully, President Carter doesn’t seem too upset about it, and Chip Carter remembers the episode well. During a break in Nelson’s performance, Chip Carter asked Nelson if he wanted to come upstairs.

“We just kept going up till we got to the roof, where we leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up,” Chip Carter told the Los Angeles Times. “If you know Washington, the White House is the hub of the spokes — the way it was designed. Most of the avenues run into the White House. You could sit up and could see all the

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When Jimmy Carter’s White House was a tour stop for long-haired, ‘torpedo’-smoking rock outlaws

Near the beginning of “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President,” the new documentary that explores the 39th president’s connection to the music community during his four-year term, President Carter offers a revelation involving one of his children, country singer Willie Nelson and what Nelson once described as “a big fat Austin torpedo.”



Jimmy Carter et al. sitting on a bench: Jimmy Carter relaxes with Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)


© (Carter Presidential Library)
Jimmy Carter relaxes with Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)

Asked about Nelson’s account of smoking marijuana on the roof of the White House at the tail end of Carter’s term in 1980, the former president lets out a chuckle.

Nelson, Carter explains in the film, “says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants at the White House. That is not exactly true. It actually was one of my sons.”

It’s a brief exchange, but the coy interaction sets the tone for this affectionate, revelatory film about the ways in which a Georgia peanut farmer, on a mission in 1976 to upend American politics, tapped a kind of political action committee of artists, stoned or otherwise, to make his long-shot run at the presidency. Once victorious, Carter opened his doors to musicians, their art and at least one illicit joint.

Directed by Mary Wharton and produced by Chris Farrell, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President” celebrated its theatrical release on Tuesday, part of an extended rollout that will see it move from theater to on-demand in October to, ultimately, CNN at the beginning of 2021.

At one point in the film, Carter sits next to a turntable with Bob Dylan’s “Bringin’ It All Back Home’” cued up and says matter-of-factly, “The Allman Bros. helped put me in the White House by raising money when I didn’t have any money.”

Across Carter’s term, artists including Nelson, Charles Mingus, Loretta Lynn, Bob Dylan, Sarah Vaughan, Cecil Taylor, Linda Ronstadt (who had campaigned against Carter with her then-boyfriend Jerry Brown), the Staple Singers, Cher (and her then-boyfriend, Gregg Allman) and Tom T. Hall either visited or performed at the White House. Crosby, Stills and Nash once dropped by the place unannounced. Carter made time for them.

The musicians’ very presence was a grand shift. Inheriting a Vietnam War-embattled White House that for the eight years prior had been occupied by Richard Nixon and, after his resignation, Gerald Ford, Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter treated the center of power not as a fortified bunker but as a kind of People’s Park. Members of the Woodstock generation were out of college and getting haircuts. The war was over, and with it the Selective Service draft.

“We thought we were celebrating victories that we had won,” says Nile Rodgers, producer and founder of funk band Chic, of the Carter presidency. “This is at about the height of the Black Power movement, the height of the women’s movement. The gay rights movement has come out.”

“Musicians are always looking for the truth, right? That’s kind of what they do as songwriters,” says director Wharton.

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New documentary details Jimmy Carter’s beat-backed road to White House

The presidential campaigns of yesteryear were very different from the race unfolding today — and one in particular had musical backing. Who knew that in 1976 the Allman Brothers Band helped push little-known Georgia Sen.Jimmy Carter into the White House?



a group of people standing in a room: President Jimmy Carter kisses singer Cher as her husband Gregg Allman stands by, second from right, during a reception at the White House in Washington, Jan. 21, 1977 held by the Carters for the Georgia Peanut Brigade, a group of campaign workers. (AP Photo/Peter Bregg)


© Provided by Boston Herald
President Jimmy Carter kisses singer Cher as her husband Gregg Allman stands by, second from right, during a reception at the White House in Washington, Jan. 21, 1977 held by the Carters for the Georgia Peanut Brigade, a group of campaign workers. (AP Photo/Peter Bregg)

Or Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson for that matter?

Reminded that these legends helped make a peanut farmer president, Mary Wharton and her producing partner Chris Farrell knew this was a story to tell and they named it, “Jimmy Carter Rock N Roll President,” which will be in theaters and virtual cinemas Wednesday.

“This touches on a lot of things,” Wharton said. “We use Carter’s connection to music as the lens through which we view his story. Hopefully, it’s kind of a new way of looking at Jimmy Carter.

“The power of music to change people’s minds, to change the world really, is so evident in Carter’s story — that was what was so exciting me.



a group of people posing for the camera: President Jimmy Carter greets Willie Nelson, left, after watching the star country and western music singer perform in a concert at the Merriweather Post Pavillion at Columbia, Md., on July 21, 1978. Nelson performed along with country western singer Many Lou Morris for the President Jimmy Carter and Mrs. Rosalynn Carter who joined thousands of young people for the show. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)


© Provided by Boston Herald
President Jimmy Carter greets Willie Nelson, left, after watching the star country and western music singer perform in a concert at the Merriweather Post Pavillion at Columbia, Md., on July 21, 1978. Nelson performed along with country western singer Many Lou Morris for the President Jimmy Carter and Mrs. Rosalynn Carter who joined thousands of young people for the show. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

“It’s multilayered and an interesting story hiding in plain sight in a way. It was no secret,” she continued, “it was all right there! But I had never heard it in spite of all my years working as a music documentary maker.”

The Allman Brothers’ first Carter benefit in Rhode Island led to the others, generating immediate cash to buy TV spots.

“We paint a portrait of Jimmy Carter through this lens of music,” Wharton said, “and come away with an understanding of who he is as a man.”

“To find solace during the challenging situations he was dealing with every day,” Wharton added, “he would retire to his office and listen to gospel music. Specifically, Willie Nelson’s gospel record.”

After Carter quoted a Bob Dylan lyric in a campaign speech, the  two met. On film Dylan says, “That was the first time I realized my songs had reached into the Establishment world. It made me uneasy. He put me at ease by not talking down to me.”

That summer Gregg Allman was busted buying pharmaceutical cocaine; to avoid prison he testified against the band’s roadie. Carter refused to distance himself from his friend. In fact, Allman and his then-wife Cher were guests at his first White House seated dinner.

“One of the things that was so great about that story is it’s a fantastic example

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