Experience Quintessential Autumn at Portland Japanese Garden

  • The Famous Tree: From National Geographic to local photography shows, there’s one Japanese Maple inside the garden that is said to be the most photographed tree in America.
  • Repeat Visits are Rewarded: Portland Japanese Garden’s hilly topography means each tree in the garden has its own “moment in the sun” and progresses towards autumn splendor on its own timeline. So literally and philosophically, you won’t get the same view twice throughout the month of October.
  • Take Your Time: The Garden’s meandering paths force you to stroll slowly and notice the exquisite colors, and textures in each of the eight different garden spaces. Says Garden Curator Sadafumi Uchiyama, “Autumn is like the last bit of excitement and you enjoy the last minutes of nature before things slow down.”
  • Embracing Impermanence: In Japan, seasons are revered for their impermanence, highlighting the fragile beauty of life. “Seeing fall colors in a Japanese garden gives you a sense of connection to something bigger than yourself,” says CEO Steve Bloom. “The fleeting nature of peak fall foliage only heightens its anticipation.”

And when is peak time to see the leaves? It depends on many factors like weather and the hilly microclimate. While the City of Portland is vibrant and full of colors, Portland Japanese Garden takes just a few weeks longer to reach peak color, which typically lands in the last two weeks of October.

Portland Japanese Garden is open Wednesday-Monday and closed Tuesdays. Adult admission is $18.95, $16.95 for seniors (65+), $15.25 for students with ID, $13.50 for youths aged 6-17. Children under five are free. Tickets can be purchased at tickets.japanesegarden.org

Media Contacts: 
Megumi Kato | 503-542-0288| [email protected]   
Lisa Christy | 503-328-0050 | [email protected]

SOURCE Portland Japanese Garden

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Hotel Chinzanso’s Japanese garden is about to get even more magical with artificial fog

A dramatic fog is drifting through the garden of Hotel Chinzanso this month, transforming the Japanese landscape into a mysterious vista. The phenomenon isn’t a regular occurrence at the hotel, which is situated in the heart of Tokyo, but part of a special event for its guests to experience unkai in the city. 

Hotel Chinzanso
Photo: Hotel Chinzanso

Unkai refers to the early morning fog or low-rise clouds that, when viewed from above, resemble a ‘sea of clouds’. These clouds can be found year-round if you’re at a high enough altitude, but reach peak visibility in autumn and winter.

Hotel Chinzanso
Photo: fb.com/Hotel.Chinzanso

If you were climbing mountains just to see unkai, you’d have to be up at the crack of dawn to catch them in time. The artificial clouds at Hotel Chinzanso, however, are released throughout the day from morning to late night, so you can sleep in and still enjoy the spectacular view in the afternoon. And it gets better: after dark, 1,000 lights are lit up around the garden to illuminate the scenery and the property’s stunning three-storey pagoda. 

Hotel Chinzanso
Photo: Hotel Chinzanso

The garden is free to visit, but it’s only open to hotel guests, who can roam around the premises at their leisure. If you’re not staying the night, just dine at any of the hotel restaurants, or opt for the themed dinner at the garden terrace for a grand view of the spectacle. From October 8 to October 31, a French dinner course will be served at the garden terrace for ¥10,000. The menu includes a selection of appetisers, steak fondue and dessert; champagne, mulled wine and free-flowing drinks are included in the price. 

Before you go out, check out our guide on going out safely in Tokyo and Japan.

 

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Japan’s hit anime ‘Your Name’ is getting a Hollywood live-action remake

Kabutocho in Nihonbashi is named Tokyo’s coolest neighbourhood in 2020

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Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen Rewarding Employees for Voting

Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen, known for its artisanal Japanese-inspired rice bowls, announced it is empowering team members, and rewarding guests, who make their voice heard this election year. Specifically, the company is encouraging all employees to vote, by providing voter registration resources and an extra hour of pay for team members, which they encourage be used to educate themselves on the voting process, candidates and issues.

Along with team member support and incentives, the brand is also offering guests:

  • A free order of Donut Dippers with purchase of any bowl on Election Day, November 3rd, for any guest who shows their “I Voted” sticker in restaurant, or uses code “IVOTED” on the Yoshinoya App or YoshinoyaAmerica.com
  • Free Delivery on the Yoshinoya App and YoshinoyaAmerica.com all November long

 

“We believe in the importance of individual expression and providing freedom of choice, whether it be in customizing your favorite bowl, or selecting the future leaders of this country,” says Dar Vasseghi, CEO. “Now more than ever, it’s vital that everyone has the time and resources needed to make informed decisions and cast their vote.”

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by QSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.

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Yoshinoya Japanese kitchen rewards team members and guests

(MENAFN – Caribbean News Global)
(PRNewsfoto/Yoshinoya America)

CALIFORNIA, USA – Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen, known for its artisanal Japanese-inspired rice bowls, announced it is empowering team members, and rewarding guests, who make their voice heard this election year.

Specifically, the company is encouraging all employees to vote, by providing voter registration resources and an extra hour of pay for team members, which they encourage be used to educate themselves on the voting process, candidates and issues.

Along with team member support and incentives, the brand is also offering guests:

  • A free order of Donut Dippers with purchase of any bowl on Election Day, November 3, for any guest who shows their “I Voted” sticker in restaurant, or uses code “IVOTED” on the Yoshinoya App or YoshinoyaAmerica.com*
  • Free Delivery on the Yoshinoya App and YoshinoyaAmerica.com all November long

“We believe in the importance of individual expression and providing freedom of choice, whether it be in customizing your favorite bowl, or selecting the future leaders of this country,” said Dar Vasseghi, chief executive officer. “Now more than ever, it’s vital that everyone has the time and resources needed to make informed decisions and cast their vote.”

*One free order of Donut Dippers per person, while supplies last.

MENAFN0610202002320000ID1100909246


Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, kindly contact the provider above.

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Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen Rewards Team Members and Guests for Making Their Voice Heard During the 2020 Election

Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen Rewards Team Members and Guests for Making Their Voice Heard During the 2020 Election

PR Newswire

TORRANCE, Calif., Oct. 5, 2020

Company will Offer FREE Donut Dippers on Election Day for Voters

TORRANCE, Calif., Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen, known for its artisanal Japanese-inspired rice bowls, today announced it is empowering team members, and rewarding guests, who make their voice heard this election year. Specifically, the company is encouraging all employees to vote, by providing voter registration resources and an extra hour of pay for team members, which they encourage be used to educate themselves on the voting process, candidates and issues.

Along with team member support and incentives, the brand is also offering guests:

  • A free order of Donut Dippers with purchase of any bowl on Election Day, November 3rd, for any guest who shows their “I Voted” sticker in restaurant, or uses code “IVOTED” on the Yoshinoya App or YoshinoyaAmerica.com*

  • Free Delivery on the Yoshinoya App and YoshinoyaAmerica.com all November long

“We believe in the importance of individual expression and providing freedom of choice, whether it be in customizing your favorite bowl, or selecting the future leaders of this country,” said Dar Vasseghi, CEO. “Now more than ever, it’s vital that everyone has the time and resources needed to make informed decisions and cast their vote.”

*One free order of Donut Dippers per person, while supplies last.

About Yoshinoya
Fresh, wholesome Japanese-style cuisine is the essence of the Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen menu. Dating back to 1899 with the opening of its first restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, Yoshinoya is among the oldest quick-service restaurant chains in operation. Throughout its century of experience, Yoshinoya continues to grow aggressively while operating or franchising more than 2,000 restaurants in Japan, Mainland China, Shanghai, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Philippines and the United States, including over 100 locations in California. The menu is based on fresh ingredients served in a variety of rice bowls, including the original Beef Bowl® that started it all in 1899. For more information, visit the company’s website.

Yoshinoya Japanese Kitchen Media Relations
213.479.4001
[email protected]

Beef Bowl® is a registered trademark of Yoshinoya.

 

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The Seattle Japanese Garden turns 60 with fitting testaments to rebirth and resilience

THE SEATTLE JAPANESE GARDEN, a 3.5-acre public garden within Washington Park Arboretum, is celebrating a very special milestone: It’s turning 60. It takes 60 years to cycle through the Chinese zodiac calendar. In Japan, the occasion is called kanreki and is celebrated as a return to childhood, a rebirth. “This auspicious anniversary seems especially fitting for our garden, which is constantly renewing,” says Jessa Gardner, Seattle Japanese Garden Programs Manager.

Development of the garden, one of the most notable Japanese gardens outside Japan, was a collaborative effort between the Arboretum Foundation and Tokyo government officials in the 1950s. Working from site photos and a topographical map, plans emerged from a team of experienced Japanese designers for an Edo-style stroll garden — a landscape to be experienced from within. A storytelling garden with footsteps revealing a succession of landscape elements and views depicting nature, literature and art. The garden, which opened to the public on June 5, 1960, is managed in partnership by Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Arboretum Foundation.

The garden was designed and built around a traditional teahouse and roji (tea garden) donated to Seattle in 1959 by the people of Tokyo. The structure, which burned in 1973, was reconstructed in 1981 by a Hiroshima-born local craftsman hired to replicate the original teahouse. The new teahouse, named Shoseian (“Arbor of the Murmuring Pines”), opened that spring. Today, the Seattle Japanese Garden hosts one of the most robust tea ceremony programs in North America.

Due to COVID-19, a series of planned celebratory events marking this significant moment in the garden’s history has been rescheduled or shifted online, with rich historical content posting to the garden’s website (seattlejapanesegarden.org), blog and daily updates on various social media channels. As of mid-August, the garden was open to visitors on a timed ticketed entry system (reservations required); tea ceremonies are suspended until further notice.

In an especially fitting reference to rebirth and resilience, the garden has announced a new partnership with the Green Legacy Hiroshima (GLH) initiative. Created in 2011, the initiative is a global volunteer campaign created to focus attention on the peril of weapons of mass destruction and celebrate the resilience of nature by sharing seeds and saplings from trees that survived the bombing of Hiroshima.

Earlier this year, “peace tree” seeds arrived safely into the care of Ray Larson, Curator of Living Collections with UW Botanic Gardens, who is overseeing a team of professional and volunteer horticulturists who are carefully tending seedlings of Camelia, Celtis, Diospyros, Ginkgo and Ilex. Once the plants are large enough, they will be planted in the Seattle Japanese Garden near plaques describing their important history. “During the last 60 years, the garden has been a welcome source of respite and rejuvenation for the community,” says Jane Stonecipher, Arboretum Foundation executive director. “We hope that the Hiroshima seedlings will continue to serve as a reminder for peace and inspiration in the decades that follow.”

Join the Seattle Japanese Garden in celebrating the past, present

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Inside the Japanese retreat at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra

Behind the unique front of this 1950s home lies a spectacular ‘Japanese retreat’ – complete with a dreamy bathroom sanctuary, modern decor and an airy open plan living area perfect for entertaining

  • An architect has created an epic oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street
  • The one-of-a-kind home at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham was inspired by Japanese interior design
  • Made from Australian-sourced recycled materials, it has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a four-car garage
  • Standout features include a bath clad in Tasmanian oak and a grass-watering system controlled from an app
  • The outdoor deck is made out of timber salvaged from a basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport
  • So unique is the design that the home is nominated for the 2020 Master Builders Association Housing Awards

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An architect has transformed a 1950s brick cottage into a unique oriental retreat fronted by an unassuming façade on a quiet Canberra street.

Redesigned in collaboration between construction firm MegaFlora and architect Blake O’Neill, the one-of-a-kind two-storey at 28 Mackennal Street in Lyneham, in the capital’s leafy north, was inspired by the owners’ love of Japanese interiors which are simple but always of the highest quality craftsmanship.

Built from recycled materials sourced across New South Wales and the ACT, the four-bedroom house – which took three years to complete – has sustainability etched into every corner.

The outdoor entertainment deck is made out of timber salvaged from an old basketball court at the Australian Institute of Sport, while a whopping 680 metres of repurposed hardwood battens run along the ceiling alone.

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The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

The redesigned 1950s cottage at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra, which has been transformed into a unique four-bed home

Spacious living areas with towering ceilings and a north-facing kitchen which opens onto the terrace are spread over 292 square metres, along with a master bedroom complete with a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite with two showers.

‘The open plan design of the master bedroom and ensuite makes it feel generous but the use of darker colours and a high level window which captures the street trees helps to create a sense of intimacy and privacy,’ architect Blake O’Neill told Daily Mail Australia.

A wooden bathtub clad in recycled Tasmanian oak is the centre-piece of the master bathroom which is flooded with natural light and covered in handmade floor-to-ceiling finger tiles – a traditional interior trend in the ‘Land of the Rising Sun’.  

The north-facing kitchen has sliding doors which open onto the outdoor entertainment deck, made from recycled timber

The north-facing kitchen has sliding doors which open onto the outdoor entertainment deck, made from recycled timber

Four bedrooms (one pictured) are spread over the 292 square metre house

Handmade finger tiles (pictured) are fixed to the walls of the two bathrooms

Four bedrooms (one pictured left) and two bathrooms fitted with handmade Japanese finger tiles (right) are spread over the 292 square metre house

Custom features include a steel fireplace (pictured) and recycled hardwood battens which run along the ceiling

Custom features include a steel fireplace (pictured) and recycled hardwood battens which run along the ceiling

Other custom features include a steel frame encasing the brick fireplace and an

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Ugly Story From American History, Inspiring Stories Of Art, On View At Shofuso Japanese House And Garden

The Underground Railroad will always serve as America’s greatest example of ordinary citizens sticking their necks out to help those suffering under the crushing weight of the nation’s racist institutions. Another example can currently be found in a most unusual place, the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia during its new exhibition, “Shofuso and Modernism: Mid-Century Collaboration between Japan and Philadelphia.”

Organized by The Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia (JASGP) with support from The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the exhibition celebrates the friendships and transcultural exchanges between Junzo Yoshimura (1908–1997, Japan), George Nakashima (1905-1990, US), Noémi Pernessin Raymond (1889-1980, France) and Antonin Raymond (1888–1976, Austria-Hungary), through their collaborative architectural projects.

Their brilliant artwork takes on added dimensions when their remarkable back stories are discovered.

The married Raymonds first visited Japan in 1919 to work for Frank Lloyd Wright on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. They subsequently set up their own architectural offices in Tokyo in 1922, where they would live and practice for the next 18 years.

Yoshimura started working for the Raymond’s architectural office in 1928 when he was still a student and continued to work with the Raymonds until 1941.

Nakashima started working at the Raymond’s firm in 1934 until his return to Seattle in 1941. Shortly after returning to the U.S., the Nakashima family was sent to the Minidoka internment camp in Hunt, Idaho.

Following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, 120,000 people of Japanese descent living on America’s West Coast were sent to internment camps. They were American citizens, like Nakashima, his wife, also of Japanese descent, and their baby daughter.

In 1943, the Raymonds interceded and successfully vouched for the Nakashimas, thus allowing the family to take refuge at the Raymonds’ Farm in New Hope, Pennsylvania where they would eventually settle and set up Nakashima’s house, studio and workshop.  

George Nakashima and his wife, Marion Okajima, were both American citizens, both born in the United States. Both were college graduates with degrees from prestigious universities, George with an undergraduate degree from the University of Washington and a master’s degree in architecture from MIT, Marion a degree from UCLA – exceedingly rare for a woman in 1940s America. George Nakashima had traveled the world as an American citizen.

That didn’t matter.

Both had Japanese ancestry so they were rounded up by the U.S. government and their freedom was taken away. No crime was committed. No trial was held.

The Raymond’s, neither of whom were born in the United States, but both possessing the golden ticket to opportunity in American–being white–possessed the influence to free the American-born and

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Chilled-Out Cat Takes a Nap in the Middle of a Japanese Zen Garden

Zen Garden Cat

Japanese zen gardens are designed to help people relax and meditate on the meaning of life. And apparently, the traditional tranquil spaces aren’t only beneficial to humans. Twitter user kmt (@syu9ji2) recently shared photos online, revealing how a cat decided to take a nap, right in the middle of the raked gravel ripples at the Kuhonbutsu Jōshinji Jōdo Buddhist temple garden in Tokyo.

Cats don’t usually need much convincing when it comes to taking a time out, but the zen garden’s peaceful atmosphere may have had some influence on this particular feline. Kmt’s photos show how the ginger tom is completely “at one” with the zen garden. Traditionally, only the garden caretakers are allowed to step foot on the gravel to create the beautiful patterns. However, this cat doesn’t care for the rules, and took it upon himself to stretch out on the sacred ground.

Later, Kmt snapped more photos of the sleepy kitty lounging around the garden, after he had woken up. This furry little guy is clearly a zen master!

Twitter user kmt (@syu9ji2) recently shared photos online, revealing how a cat decided to take a nap, right in the middle of a zen garden in Tokyo.

Zen Garden Cat

This furry little guy is clearly a zen master!

Zen Garden CatZen Garden Catkmt / @syu9ji2: Twitter

All images via kmt / @syu9ji2.

Related Articles:

How Zen Gardens Became the Ultimate Expression of Japanese Culture

Find Inner Peace by Creating Your Very Own Japanese Zen Garden

22 Creative Products to Help You Relax, Unwind, and Achieve “Zen”

Adorable Japanese Cat Thinks She’s a Dog Just Like Her Shiba Inu Siblings

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This Japanese Vegetable Grater Is My Quickest Route to Dinner

Healthyish Loves It is our weekly column where we tell you about the stuff we can’t live without. See our past recommendations here!

When I first moved out of my parent’s home and into my own apartment, it was easy to remember to buy a rice cooker and a chef’s knife. But when I tried to make the Japanese dishes I grew up eating, I began to realize all the small but essential tools that were missing in my new kitchen: bamboo cooking chopsticks, a rice paddle, and, of course, a grater.

Almost every Japanese household has a vegetable grater. This is because Japanese cooking often uses oroshi-mono, which directly translates to “something grated.” Raw grated ginger is often served on the side of grilled vegetables or tempura, and raw grated daikon commonly tops wafū burgers or fried fish. Both are also served as a side to soba noodles or udon noodles, as they are the perfect way to add spice and to freshen up something a bit salty or fatty: Daikon is high in vitamin C and helps metabolize fats, and ginger is anti-inflammatory, making heavier foods much less stressful on our stomachs.

The best vegetable graters look a bit different from those used for cheese. They should lie flat, so you can grate perpendicular to the table with stability, and they should have a container on the bottom to capture the vegetable and easily transfer it to dishes.

Raw grated vegetables add an additional layer of texture like a condiment or sauce would, allowing me to incorporate the fresh flavor of whole foods without the space and clean-up that a food processor requires, or time and skill of slicing and chopping with a knife. If I find that I have some extra daikon or nagaimo yam in my fridge, I just grate them and serve it on the side of whatever I’m cooking that night. If I have some carrots or tomatoes close to spoiling, I grate them and toss them into a stew or curry to add a natural sweetness and thickness. Although it doesn’t take up counter space like a rice cooker or knife’s block, this small and simple tool is one I can’t imagine my kitchen without.

Image may contain: Plant, Food, Vegetable, Carrot, Human, and Person

Non Slip Quick Radish Grater

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