Trump Returns To White House, Removes Mask Despite Infection : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

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President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

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President Trump, who spent the weekend in the hospital being treated for COVID-19, made a theatrical return to the White House Monday evening, disembarking Marine One and walking the staircase to the South Portico entrance, where he turned to face the cameras, removed his mask and gave his signature two thumbs up.

Shortly before, a masked Trump had emerged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was receiving treatment, pumping his fist and giving a thumbs up as he ignored questions from reporters.

In a video recorded at the White House which he tweeted later, the president seemed somewhat more circumspect about a virus that he has often downplayed, along with measures to halt its spread, such as wearing masks.

Trump thanked the staff of Walter Reed and said that during his three-night stay he had “learned so much about coronavirus.”

“One thing that’s for certain – don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it. You’re going to beat it,” he said. “We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines. All developed recently. And you’re going to beat it.”

“I went, I didn’t feel so good,” he said, but added that, “And two days ago, I could have left two days ago. Two days ago I felt great, like better than I have in a long time. I said just recently, better than 20 years ago.”

Trump’s physician, Sean Conley, said he is cautiously optimistic about the president’s prognosis, but that medical staff needed to remain on guard for another week.

“Over the past 24 hours, the president’s condition has continued to improve,” Conley told reporters at a news briefing Monday. “He’s met or exceeded all standard hospital discharge criteria.”

“Although he may not be entirely out of the woods yet, the team and I agree that all our evaluations, and most importantly, his clinical status, support the president’s safe return home, where he will be surrounded by world-class medical care, 24/7.”

The president’s treatment has included the steroid dexamethasone and a five-day course of remdesivir. Dr. Brian Garibaldi told reporters on Monday that Trump would get a fifth dose of remdesivir at the White House on Tuesday night and that he continues to receive a steroid.

Asked by a reporter if he had concerns about a possible worsening or reversal of the president’s condition, Conley responded: “You’re absolutely right.”

“That’s why we all remain cautiously optimistic and on guard, because we are in a bit of uncharted territory when it

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White House declines to conduct contact tracing for Rose Garden event, despite cluster of infection

Video: President Trump’s improving health suggests ‘the virus is now one we can handle’ (Sky News Australia)

President Trump’s improving health suggests ‘the virus is now one we can handle’

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Chris Christie et al. standing in front of a crowd: Chris Christie greets others after President Donald J. Trump spoke with Judge Amy Coney Barrett during a ceremony to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept 26, 2020 in Washington, DC.


Chris Christie greets others after President Donald J. Trump spoke with Judge Amy Coney Barrett during a ceremony to announce Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House on Saturday, Sept 26, 2020 in Washington, DC.

  • The White House is not conducting contact tracing for its Sept. 26 Rose Garden event, The New York Times reported.
  • At least eight people who attended the event have tested positive for COVID-19, including President Donald Trump.
  • The event was held to announce the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Eight people who attended a Rose Garden ceremony less than two weeks ago have tested positive for COVID-19, including US President Donald Trump, but the White House has chosen not to conduct contact tracing, The New York Times reported on Monday.

Judd Deere, White House deputy press secretary, told Business Insider that the Trump administration “has plans and procedures in place that incorporate current CDC guidelines.”

The US Centres for Disease Control recommends that contact tracing be conducted for “close contacts,” defined as anyone who has spent at least 15 minutes within six feet of “laboratory-confirmed or probable COVID-19 patients.” Close contacts are informed of potential exposure and instructed to self-quarantine, a process that “slows the spread of COVID-19,” according to the CDC.

Deere asserted that the White House “has established a robust contact tracing program,” but refused to say whether it has carried out contact tracing, specifically, for the Rose Garden event, per CDC guidelines.

“You have my answer,” he said in an email.

According to The Times’ reporting, based on another White House official’s statements, the answer is that no such work is being carried out for the Sept. 26 event, held to announce Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Instead, the White House is limiting itself to conducting tracing only for contacts “within a two-day window from diagnosis,” The Times reported, which appears to consist “mostly of emails notifying people of potential exposure.”

The CDC states that the coronavirus can incubate for two days to two weeks before a person shows symptoms or tests positive. On average, it takes four to five days.

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All of the contradictions surrounding Trump’s COVID-19 infection

  • Since the news broke that President Donald Trump contracted COVID-19, accurate information about his illness has been hard to come by.
  • White House officials and the president’s doctors have not been straightforward about the Trump’s condition and the timeline of his diagnosis.
  • Here is a breakdown of their contradictions so far.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

News broke that President Donald Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus with a tweet he posted at 12:54 a.m. ET on Friday. In the days since, statements from the White House and Trump’s own physician have muddied the waters, and the public is still largely in the dark about the state of the president’s health.

Here is a breakdown of the contradictions and cover-ups surrounding Trump’s illness.

  • In an interview with Fox News on Thursday night, Trump told host Sean Hannity he had just learned that his adviser, Hope Hicks, tested positive for the virus. The White House has now acknowledged that at the time he spoke to Hannity, Trump had already tested positive himself on a rapid test and was awaiting results from a second test.
  • Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday afternoon, “out of an abundance of caution,” White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said at the time. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows later painted a dimmer picture of Trump’s health on Friday when he was hospitalized. “He had a fever and his blood oxygen level had dropped rapidly,” he told Fox News on Saturday evening.  
  • On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley told reporters that “yesterday and today” Trump had not been treated with supplemental oxygen. On Sunday, however, Conley disclosed that the president was indeed given oxygen: “I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction, and in doing so, came off as if we were trying to hide something.”
  • Conley also told reporters on Saturday that Trump was “72 hours into the diagnosis,” suggesting the president had tested positive on Wednesday — before he traveled to Minnesota that evening for a campaign rally and over 24 hours before his diagnosis was officially announced. Conley later walked back his remarks, claiming in a memot that he’d used the term “seventy two hours” instead of “day three” and ‘”forty eight hours” instead of “day two.” 

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  • Conley also wrote in a memo that Trump had been treated with “polyclonal antibody therapy,” but the treatment is actually a monoclonal, from Regeneron, which Conley misspelled as “Regeron.”
  • Meadows told reporters that “we’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery” on Saturday. The comments reportedly infuriated the president, and Trump sought to provide his own rosier take of his situation on Twitter, posting, “I am feeling well!”
  • Trump started treatment with a steroid, called dexamethasone, Conley said on Sunday. Conley offered an upbeat assessment of Trump’s health during the same press conference, though the drug is normally reserved for
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White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


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President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

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Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he was [positive],” he said.

Shortly after the briefing, Conley released a statement retracting his initial timeline from the press briefing, saying he “incorrectly” said 72 hours instead of “day three” and 48 hours instead of “day two.” (Even though Garibaldi said “48 hours,” not Conley himself.)

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” the statement said.

The company that makes the antibody treatment is called Regeneron.

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Trump Infection Puts Large Circle of White House Aides at Risk

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump interacted or traveled with a large coterie of top aides and advisers in the days before he was diagnosed with Covid-19, raising the risk of a widespread outbreak within the White House.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.


© Photographer: MANDEL NGAN/AFP
US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.

The circle of close contacts with the infected president and his wife, Melania, begins with his adviser Hope Hicks, who fell ill on Wednesday night. She traveled with Trump to the presidential debate on Tuesday and to campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday.

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She was seen in close quarters with several other officials, including White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller.

Depending on how far the virus spreads through the halls of the West Wing and Congress, as well as the president’s campaign headquarters, much more than Trump’s travel schedule may be derailed. Face-to-face negotiations over another round of economic stimulus may be complicated, and the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

It wasn’t immediately clear when or how the president was infected and how many other White House aides will be asked to quarantine due to contact with the Trumps or Hicks. The typical incubation period for the virus, or time between exposure and emergence of symptoms, is thought to be two to five days.

It is possible, if not likely, the president was infected before Wednesday, when Hicks started exhibiting signs of illness.

Ronny Jackson, the president’s former White House physician, told Fox News early Friday morning that the positive test would “affect everybody who has been around the president” as they would likely need to self-isolate. He cautioned that it’s not yet clear how widely the virus has circulated. Even though Hicks tested positive, “that doesn’t mean that’s the person he got it from,” Jackson told Fox.

“Contract tracing is being done and the appropriate notifications and recommendations will be made,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement.

Early Wednesday, Trump met with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to discuss negotiations over a virus relief package, according to Mnuchin.

Later that day, Trump set off for Minnesota for a fundraiser and rally. Hicks was aboard Marine One, the presidential helicopter, when it departed the White House for Joint Base Andrews, where Air Force One lands.

Joining her on the helicopter, along with Trump, were the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kusner; social media director Dan Scavino; the president’s body man, Nick Luna; and adviser Stephen Miller.

Meadows and White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany joined the president’s entourage on Air Force One. Meadows was seen chatting with Kushner on the tarmac in Minneapolis, and during the return flight, the chief of staff came back to the press cabin to speak with reporters.

On Tuesday, Meadows attended a meeting on Capitol Hill with

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Trump Infection Puts Large Retinue of White House Aides at Risk

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump interacted or traveled with a large coterie of top aides and advisers in the days before he was diagnosed with Covid-19, raising the risk of a widespread outbreak within the White House.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.


© Photographer: MANDEL NGAN/AFP
US President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on September 22, 2020.

The circle of close contacts with the infected president and his wife, Melania, begins with his adviser Hope Hicks, who fell ill on Wednesday night. She traveled with Trump to the presidential debate on Tuesday and to campaign stops in Minnesota on Wednesday.

She was seen in close quarters with several other officials, including White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller.

Depending on how far the virus spreads through the halls of the West Wing and Congress, as well as the president’s campaign headquarters, much more than Trump’s travel schedule may be derailed. Face-to-face negotiations over another round of economic stimulus may be complicated, and the confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett could be delayed.

It wasn’t immediately clear when or how the president was infected and how many other White House aides will be asked to quarantine due to contact with the Trumps or Hicks. The typical incubation period for the virus, or time between exposure and emergence of symptoms, is thought to be two to five days.

It is possible, if not likely, the president was infected before Wednesday, when Hicks started exhibiting signs of illness.

Ronny Jackson, the president’s former White House physician, told Fox News early Friday morning that the positive test would “affect everybody who has been around the president” as they would likely need to self-isolate. He cautioned that it’s not yet clear how widely the virus has circulated. Even though Hicks tested positive, “that doesn’t mean that’s the person he got it from,” Jackson told Fox.

“Contract tracing is being done and the appropriate notifications and recommendations will be made,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement.

Early Wednesday, Trump met with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to discuss negotiations over a virus relief package, according to Mnuchin.

Later that day, Trump set off for Minnesota for a fundraiser and rally. Hicks was aboard Marine One, the presidential helicopter, when it departed the White House for Joint Base Andrews, where Air Force One lands.

Joining her on the helicopter, along with Trump, were the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kusner; social media director Dan Scavino; the president’s body man, Nick Luna; and adviser Stephen Miller.

Meadows and White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany joined the president’s entourage on Air Force One. Meadows was seen chatting with Kushner on the tarmac in Minneapolis, and during the return flight, the chief of staff came back to the press cabin to speak with reporters.

On Tuesday, Meadows attended a meeting on Capitol Hill with Barrett

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Coronavirus: Hertsmere infection rise ‘due to teenage house parties’

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Hertfordshire Borough Council said the rise in cases in Hertsmere was “significant”

Large house parties attended by 16 to 19-year-olds were to blame for one of the biggest rises in coronavirus cases in England, a council said.

Hertsmere in Hertfordshire had the third highest rate of infection for any area outside the North West.

The borough council warned schools may close if residents do not “get a grip”.

Hertsmere, which has a population of just under 105,000, recorded 60 positive cases of Covid-19 in the seven days up to 4 September.

‘Stern warning’

This gave the area, which includes Radlett, Bushey, Elstree and Borehamwood, 57.2 cases per 100,000 of the population.

Only Birmingham, Bradford and some areas of the North West had a higher per 100,000 infection rate.

The week before the 60 positive cases were recorded in Hertsmere, there were only 13 cases.

Tim Hutchings, the councillor responsible for public health at the council, said the rise in cases in Hertsmere was “significant”.

He said the outbreak was among a “group of young people in a number of large social gatherings in private homes in the last week of August”.

Conservative Mr Hutchings said the council had written to parents of children at schools where fellow pupils were self-isolating with a “stern warning: stop these house parties and private events or face enforcement action of up to a £10,000 fine”.

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