House Democrats’ stimulus bill includes stimulus checks for illegal immigrants, protections from deportations

A stimulus package proposed by Democrats in the House of Representatives includes a number of items that will benefit illegal immigrants — including an expansion of stimulus checks and protections from deportations for illegal immigrants in certain “essential” jobs.

The $2.2 trillion bill includes language that allows some illegal immigrants — who are “engaged in essential critical infrastructure labor or services in the United States” —  to be placed into “a period of deferred action” and authorized to work if they meet certain conditions.

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It also grants protections to those employers who hire those undocumented immigrants, ordering that “the hiring, employment or continued employment” of the defined group is not in violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act. That lasts until 90 days after the public health emergency is ended.

A Democratic description of that part of the bill says that “such workers are deemed to be in a period of deferred action and to be authorized for employment, and employers are shielded from certain immigration-related violations for employing such workers.”

It’s language that was included in the first House Democratic stimulus bill proposed back in May — a bill that was ultimately rejected in the Republican-controlled Senate.

Also in the legislation is language that would allow the a second round of stimulus checks, $1,200 per adults and $500 per dependant, to be extended to those without a social security number — including those in the country illegally who file taxes via an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN).

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The bill also would require the Department of Homeland Security to review the files of those in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody and to prioritize those for release if they are not a threat to national security. It also demands migrants have access to free video calls and access to virtual legal assistance from nonprofits.

Those parts of the bill were criticized by immigration hawks like the Federation for American Immigration Reform.

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“Once again House Democrats are trying to bailout millions of illegal aliens – and not just financially, but give them de facto amnesty as well,” FAIR’s government relations director RJ Hauman told Fox News. “This would be an unprecedented move and take desperately needed money and jobs away from Americans in the middle of a pandemic. Even though it has absolutely zero chance of becoming law, I hope voters are paying close attention.”

The House was expected to vote on the bill Wednesday evening, but it was later delayed to allow Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin another day to attempt to thrash out a deal.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram contributed to this report.

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House report: Medical neglect, falsified records harmed detained immigrants

In addition to obtaining thousands of pages of internal staff complaints, assessments and whistleblower accounts, congressional staff conducted on-site inspections at 20 facilities in Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas. 

The report cites, for instance, falsification of records involving Jean Carlos Jimenez-Joseph, a 27-year-old Panamanian migrant who committed suicide in May 2017 at ICE’s Stewart Detention Center in Georgia after reporting hallucinations and suicidal thoughts. 

Jimenez-Joseph was a recipient of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an Obama-era program that allows undocumented immigrants who came to the country as children the ability to live and work in the United States. He was detained 69 days at the Georgia facility, which is run by private prison company CoreCivic, after being arrested for a misdemeanor in 2017.  

“In addition to leaving the unit unsupervised on seven occasions the night of Jimenez’s suicide, Officer [Redacted] falsely logged that he completed security rounds at 12:00 a.m. and 12:28 a.m., neither of which were corroborated by video surveillance footage,” according to an internal ICE review cited in the report.  

The House Oversight reports also cites a review by Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties of the Adelanto detention center, a California facility run by the company GEO Group. That review reported that a “failure to hire an effective and qualified clinical leader contributed to the inadequate detainee medical care that resulted in medical injuries, including bone deformities and detainee deaths.”  

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3-Judge Court Blocks Trump Memo On Census, Unauthorized Immigrants : NPR

President Trump, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center) and U.S. Attorney General William Barr walk into the White House Rose Garden for a July 2019 press conference on the census.

Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images


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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center) and U.S. Attorney General William Barr walk into the White House Rose Garden for a July 2019 press conference on the census.

Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A special three-judge court in New York has ruled to block the Trump administration’s efforts to make an unprecedented change to the constitutionally mandated count of every person living in the country — leaving out unauthorized immigrants from the census numbers that determine each state’s share of seats in Congress.

The ruling comes after the July release of a memorandum by President Trump that directs Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, to provide Trump with information needed to exclude immigrants living in the U.S. without authorization from the apportionment count.

Since the first U.S. census in 1790, the country’s official once-a-decade population numbers used to reapportion seats in the House of Representatives have included both U.S. citizens and noncitizens, regardless of immigration status. Enacted after the Civil War, the 14th Amendment ended the counting of an enslaved person as “three fifths” of a free person by requiring the counting of the “whole number of persons in each state.”

The president ultimately plays a limited role in reapportioning Congress. After the president hands off the latest numbers to Congress, it is the clerk of the House of Representatives who is supposed to send to the governors a “certificate of the number of Representatives” each state receives, according to Title 2 of the U.S. Code.

Trump’s memorandum has sparked a total of eight legal challenges around the country. In addition to the two based in Manhattan, federal judges are hearing cases over the memo in northern California, Washington, D.C., Massachusetts and Maryland, where an ongoing lawsuit about the administration’s efforts to produce citizenship data was expanded last month with additional allegations about the memo.

Fearing the loss of a House seat after the 2020 census, the state of Alabama is leading an ongoing case that was filed in 2018 to try to force the Census Bureau to not include unauthorized immigrants in the apportionment count.

The ruling in New York is likely to be appealed directly tothe U.S. Supreme Court. Federal law allows decisions by a three-judge court — which are convened for lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of how congressional seats are reapportioned among the states — to skip review by an appeals court.

In addition to this legal fight over who counts for reapportioning House seats, the bureau is embroiled in lawsuits over the Trump administration’s directive to shorten the 2020 census schedule — already disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic — in order to make sure the president receives the apportionment count by Dec. 31.

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