$2.5 million glass house in Illinois blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor spaces

636 Division St., Barrington: $1,899,000 | Listed: Sept. 4, 2020

This five-bedroom home near Baker Lake in Barrington has 4½ bathrooms and melds contemporary interiors with elements of both a rustic farmhouse and industrial design. Built in 2015, the home’s custom glass entryway touts ceiling-to-floor windows that invite sunlight streaming into the dining and living rooms. Three stone fireplaces and heated driftwood floors throughout provide warmth, while the family room’s reclaimed wood beams and a showpiece-worthy reclaimed barn door lend a relaxed air to the home. The custom-designed Knapp kitchen features Carrara Marble countertops, a farmhouse sink and a walk-in pantry. A 400-bottle wine cellar, a sunroom with an outdoor television and a wood-plank ceiling, and a wet bar equipped with a dual kegerator tap elevate the home, while the primary bedroom suite includes a bathroom with a standalone tub and a shower with a full-body spray. A 4½-car garage completes the home.

Agent: Barbara Cullen of Baird & Warner, 847-909-4063

*Some photos are “virtually staged,” meaning they have been digitally altered to represent different furnishing or decorating options.

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$2.5M Glass House in Illinois Blurs the Lines Between Indoor and Outdoor Spaces

For those with any trepidation about living in a glass house, an Illinois home may change your mind.

The listing agent for a glass house in Northfield, IL, which is on the market for $2.5 million, says its design is likely to surprise you.

The home was designed by the architect Thomas Roszak, who was named one of the country’s best residential architects by Architectural Digest in 2005. Roszak’s other projects include Parkline Condos in Chicago and InterContinental Miami.

“The way that he designed it made it feel very intimate. You don’t feel like you’re in a glass house,” says Carrie McCormick of @properties.


It’s had just a single owner since it was built in 2002—the architect himself. He designed the 5,500-square-foot pad, which consists of glass cubes stacked atop one another. There’s very little a buyer will need to do except to move on in.

One reason is the use of materials: steel beams, stone throughout, and concrete and glass walls—all solid.

Teak was chosen for the front and rear decks. The kitchen faucets are by Dornbracht, and there are Poliform cabinets, closets, vanities, and storage systems throughout.

“The materials that were used were timeless and impeccably maintained,” says McCormick.

The living room’s soaring 20-foot ceiling is another hallmark of the design. Even the three-car garage is a glass cube.

A finished lower level offers opportunity for flex space: a home gym, home office, or home theater, for example. The home has five bedrooms—all on the second level—and 4.5 bathrooms. The fact that it’s on an acre lot ensures a lot of privacy.

Exterior of house in Northfield, IL

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Entry

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Living room

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Dining room

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Kitchen

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Playroom

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Master bathroom

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Office

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Walk-in closet

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Lower level

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Yard

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It’s also—another surprise—perfect for families.

McCormick says the architect built the home for his family, which included three children.

“The design of it and the components of the home are unbelievable,” says McCormick. “It’s won numerous awards and been in many books.”

Among those awards: an Honor Award in 2008 from the American Institute of Architects.

Those glass walls are a huge plus for any nature lover—even during a frigid Chicago winter.

“Because it’s glass, you really feel like you’re living with nature,” says McCormick. “Whether it’s spring, summer, fall, or winter, you’re surrounded by color.”

The ideal buyer could very well be an architect who understands through experience—and appreciates—just how much talent it takes to construct a home like this.

“It’s definitely someone who wants something different. It’s not someone who just wants to live in Northfield. They want to live in this house,” says McCormick.

Located on a private street in this suburb about 20 miles north of Chicago, “it’s a great North Shore neighborhood,” she says, with access to Sunset Ridge, a top-rated school district, and near several country clubs.

It’s an easy commute to downtown Chicago, which is about a half-hour’s drive away on I-94 E, as well

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Illinois House committee investigating Speaker Michael Madigan set to hear testimony from Exelon executive

An executive from Commonwealth Edison parent company Exelon is set to testify Tuesday before a special Illinois House committee investigating Speaker Michael Madigan in connection with a bribery case involving the utility.



a man sitting at a desk looking at a laptop: David Glockner, Exelon s executive vice president for compliance and audit, answers questions at a meeting with the Illinois Commerce Commission in Chicago on July 29, 2020. nn


© Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
David Glockner, Exelon s executive vice president for compliance and audit, answers questions at a meeting with the Illinois Commerce Commission in Chicago on July 29, 2020. nn

The six-member special investigating committee, formed this summer after federal prosecutors alleged ComEd engaged in a “yearslong bribery scheme” aimed at currying favor with Madigan, has become a partisan flash point ahead of the November election.

The panel was formed at the request of House Republican leader Jim Durkin of Western Springs to determine whether Madigan engaged in “conduct unbecoming to a legislator” and should face potential discipline. The speaker and the panel’s Democratic chairman, state Rep. Emanuel “Chris” Welch of Hillside, have accused the GOP of political posturing. Republicans accuse Democrats of acting in defense of Madigan, who has not been charged and has denied wrongdoing.

Madigan was one of several witnesses the committee’s three Republicans asked to testify, but all declined the invitation, with the exception of ComEd. Set to testify on the utility’s behalf on Tuesday is David Glockner, Exelon’s executive vice president for compliance and audit.

The six-member panel could subpoena witnesses, but that would require one of three Democrats to vote with the three Republicans to compel testimony. One Democrat also would have to side with Republicans for the special committee to approve a charge against Madigan.

As part of a deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. attorney’s office announced earlier this summer, ComEd agreed to pay a $200 million fine and cooperate with investigators after federal prosecutors alleged in July that the utility offered jobs, contracts and payments to Madigan allies in the hopes of winning support for favorable legislation.

The agreement with federal prosecutors focuses specifically on two major pieces of energy legislation approved in the legislature in the past decade: the 2011 Energy Infrastructure and Modernization Act and the 2016 Future Energy Jobs Act, both of which resulted in major benefits for the state’s largest utility.

In a letter Friday declining the invitation to testify, Madigan argued that “House Democrats won significant concessions, much to the chagrin of ComEd and Exelon, likely costing the companies millions of dollars in profits.”

Seeking to turn the tables on Durkin, Madigan noted the key role the House GOP leader and then-Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner played in negotiating the 2016 legislation, which opponents characterized as a bailout for two Exelon nuclear power plants.

“If Rep. Durkin were to put aside his current political agenda and speak honestly about his experiences with this energy legislation in which he was personally involved, I am certain he would attest that the process of negotiating that bill was bipartisan and his input was likely more valuable than mine,” Madigan wrote.

Following Madigan’s cue, Welch said in a statement Monday that he

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Illinois Democrats look to win more suburban state legislative seats in November despite corruption probe

After winning a slew of suburban state legislative seats long held by Republicans in 2018, Illinois Democrats are looking to expand their reach even further in November as renewed controversy swirls around their powerful leader, longtime House Speaker Michael Madigan.



a man wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: Illinois state Rep. Grant Wehrli.


© Grant Wehrli campaign/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Illinois state Rep. Grant Wehrli.

Republicans for years have built their campaign strategy around vilifying Madigan, who has been speaker for all but two years since 1983, but it hasn’t paid off in a big way at the ballot box. This year, however, the GOP hopes its anti-Madigan message will resonate in a new way after federal prosecutors in July alleged that Commonwealth Edison engaged in a “yearslong bribery scheme” designed to curry favor with the speaker.

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But Madigan, who has not been charged and has denied wrongdoing, is only on the ballot in his Southwest Side district, and Democrats are hoping to capitalize on a changing suburban electorate’s dissatisfaction with the name at the top of the Republican ticket: President Donald Trump.

All 118 Illinois House seats and 22 of 59 state Senate seats are on the ballot this fall. But because 52 House and 11 Senate races are uncontested, a handful of competitive districts — largely in the suburbs — will determine whether Democrats lose or add to their veto-proof majorities in both chambers. Democrats hold supermajorities of 74-44 in the House and 40-19 in the Senate, meaning Republicans would need a historic number of victories to take control of either chamber.



Michael Madigan et al. standing next to a man in a suit and tie: Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan walks out after a House Democratic caucus meeting on Nov. 12, 2019, at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan walks out after a House Democratic caucus meeting on Nov. 12, 2019, at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield.

The Democrats not only control both chambers of the General Assembly and all statewide offices, but they also enjoy an overwhelming advantage in campaign cash.

With billionaire former Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner’s funding out of the picture and other conservative donors focusing their spending on defeating Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s proposed graduated-rate income tax amendment, “if it were just about money, it really would be a wipeout,” said Kent Redfield, professor emeritus of political science with the University of Illinois system’s Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

On a larger scale for Republicans nationally, spending big to keep the Democrats from picking up a couple of seats in the Illinois legislature “doesn’t really seem like a good investment if you can flip a chamber” in another state, Redfield said.

“But for the Commonwealth Edison investigation, you’re really looking at a perfect storm in terms of the Democrats building their majority, with the changes in the suburbs and then the overwhelming money advantage,” Redfield said.

“If you want to ask the question, why are they making such a huge push when they already have such big majorities in both chambers, one of the answers might be that it’s an opportunity to so damage the Republican Party in the state of Illinois that it will be very difficult for them

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Two former Illinois governors, now out of prison, have advice for House Speaker Michael Madigan

Two former Illinois governors who served time in federal prison have some unsolicited advice for Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan.



George Ryan standing in front of a building


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Former Gov. George Ryan, who served prison time for federal corruption charges, was the Speaker of the House before Madigan was elected speaker in 1983.

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“I always got along with Mike and we worked together pretty much to get things done for the state and we worked together when I was speaker and when I was governor,” Ryan said in an interview. “Mike’s got his hands full, I think.”

Ryan, a Republican, is doing interviews promoting his book, “Until I Could Be Sure,” which focuses on his steps to stop the death penalty in Illinois in 1999 before being convicted and sentenced to prison for corruption in 2006.

The 86-year-old Ryan had a message for the 78-year-old Madigan about being in the scope of federal investigators.

“You know when the FBI puts their ‘x’ on you that they’re going to prosecute you, they’re only about 92 percent effective,” Ryan said. “They’re probably the most effective agency in government.”

“That’s always the best advice, be open and above board about everything,” Ryan said.

In late July on his podcast for WLS radio, former Gov. Rod Blagojevich said Madigan should be honest.

“If you’re not going to fight back and deny this stuff and tell the people who look to you as a major public official that not only did you not doing anything wrong but ‘I’m going to take the questions and answer specific allegations and I’ve got nothing to hide,’ unless you do that then you’re telling me you’re guilty,” Blagojevich said.

Blagojevich, a Democrat who calls himself a “Trumpocrat,” maintains his innocence of federal corruption charges despite serving years in prison, only to have his sentence commuted by President Donald Trump earlier this year.

The Speaker needs to come clean with the people of Illinois, Blagojevich said.

“We don’t have a government of the people, by the people and for the people,” Blagojevich said. “It is instead government of Mike Madigan, by Mike Madigan and for Mike Madigan.”

Madigan Friday declined to voluntarily testify in front of a House committee. Tuesday’s House hearing in Springfield won’t have any witnesses, according to chairman state Rep. Chris Welch, D-Hillside. It’s unclear if the committee will move to subpoena Madigan to testify, Madigan said Friday that he won’t appear before the committee.

Tags: States, News, Illinois, Death Penalty, Rod Blagojevich

Original Author: Greg Bishop, The Center Square

Original Location: Two former Illinois governors, now out of prison, have advice for House Speaker Michael Madigan

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Illinois 6th District House election preview: Sean Casten vs. Jeanne Ives

  • First-term Rep. Sean Casten will face Republican Jeanne Ives in Illinois’ 6th Congressional District.
  • The district is located in northeastern Illinois and is home to parts of Lake, McHenry, Cook, DuPage, and Kane counties.
  • With $3 million in cash on hand, Casten has over six times more capital to spend approaching the election.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

First-term Rep. Sean Casten is looking to defend his freshly-won House seat against Republican Jeanne Ives in Illinois’ 6th Congressional District this fall. 

The candidates

Before going into politics, Casten primarily worked with companies associated with clean energy. He served as the president and CEO of Turbosteam Corporation, a company that works to lower greenhouse gas emissions by generating power from wasted electricity. He is the founder and former CEO of Recycled Energy Development, which attempted to find a profitable solution to wasted heat capture technologies.

In 2018, Casten defeated 6-term incumbent Rep. Peter Roskam to represent Illinois’ 6th Congressional District, one of the many Democrats who flipped suburban House seats back into Democratic hands that year. In Congress, Casten serves on the powerful House Financial Services Committee, the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, and the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. 

Ives, Casten’s challenger, is a veteran of the U.S. Army and former 3-term member of the Illinois House of Representatives. 

The district

Illinois’ 6th Congressional District is located in northeastern Illinois and includes portions of Lake, McHenry, Cook, DuPage, and Kane counties. The district is home to parts of West Chicago and some of Chicago’s western suburbs. Casten is the first Democrat to represent the district since Republican Rep. Harold R. Collier took office in 1973.

The district is one of a dozen nationwide that flipped from backing Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in 2012 to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016. After backing Romney by over eight points in 2012, the district voted for Clinton over now-President Donald Trump in a 50-43 percent split.

The money race

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Casten has raised $3.8 million for his campaign – over twice as much as Ives with $1.6 million. Ives currently has only $502,000 in cash on hand remaining, widely trailing behind Casten who has $3 million on hand.

What experts say

The race between Casten and Ives is rated as “safe Democratic” by Inside Elections and The Cook Political Report and “likely Democratic” by Sabato’s Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

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Officials allow Illinois lawmakers to investigate House speaker bribery scandal

Federal prosecutors gave Illinois lawmakers the green light to perform an independent investigation into long-time House Speaker Michael Madigan, committee members said, but Democrats and Republicans disagree on what it means for the investigation.

The Illinois House of Representatives will continue its proceedings after U.S. Attorney John Lausch Jr. told the House Special Investigation Committee that it would be allowed to move forward as long as it doesn’t jeopardize his ongoing probe into ComEd and the company’s patronage and bribery scheme aimed at currying favor with Madigan.

The speaker has not been charged with a crime and has denied wrongdoing. Madigan was implicated in ComEd’s deferred prosecution agreement.

The committee’s chairman, state Rep. Chris Welch, D-Hillside, said Tuesday that the committee plans to continue but its actions will be limited.

“The U.S. Attorney made it clear we could seek testimony from whoever we choose; however, they requested we refrain from seeking any materials or testimony related to the [deferred prosecution agreement] that is still confidential or anything in the possession of the federal government. In other words, we can call witnesses, but we can’t really ask them any questions,” he said in a statement.

Welch said he was disappointed that information from his and state Rep. Tom Demmer’s, R-Dixon, conversation with Lausch was made public prematurely.

“We wouldn’t be engaged in this he/say she/say conversation if Demmer had not jumped the gun to put out his false narrative,” Welch said. “But once again my Republican colleagues have disrespected the process for political gain.”

Demmer did not respond to a call about Welch’s comments, but told WBEZ that Lausch’s comments to him and Welch cleared a path for Madigan to be called to testify before the committee.

House Republicans made it clear they’d like to interrogate Madigan ally and former ComEd lobbyist Michael McLain, former City Club of Chicago CEO Jay Doherty and others connected to the probe.

The investigative committee is a political function that’s more akin to a fact-finding mission. Should they vote to move forward, the matter is turned over to another committee of lawmakers who will deliberate what Welch’s group found and mete out punishment.

The only other time the procedure has been used in Illinois history was in a 2012 probe about bribery allegations against Rep. Derrick Smith, D-Chicago.

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Scott Kegarise, Illinois House 56th District Republican nominee

Candidate profile

Scott Kegarise

Running for: State Representative of the 56th District

Political party affiliation: Republican

Political/civic background: Former President of Schaumburg Athletic Association and League Commissioner with 33 years involvement in non-paid positions. Schaumburg Jaycees, coach, Miss America Pageant system, Sister Cities host family, District 54 Citizens Advisory, Elgin O’Hare Citizens Advisory Council, Young Sportsman’s Soccer League Vice President, Illinois Youth Soccer Referee Instructor and Assessor

Occupation: Small Business Owner

Education: College, Military

Campaign website: KegariseforIllinois.com

Facebook: KegariseforIllinois


The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board sent nominees for the Illinois House of Representatives a list of questions to find out their views on a range of important issues facing the state of Illinois and their districts. Scott Kegarise submitted the following responses:

1. The COVID-19 pandemic has hammered the finances of Illinois. The state is staring at a $6.2 billion budget shortfall in this fiscal year. What should be done? Please be specific.

The impact of the shutdown has crippled our state’s already unstable economy. Jobs have been lost, businesses have been shuttered or closed, and there has been little to no help from the Illinois Department of Employment Security. The Governor should work with the legislature, with business and community leaders, and find solutions independent of partisanship. We need to be focused on the things we can do to help keep our family, friends, and neighbors safe and prosperous.

2. What grade — “A” to “F” — would you give Gov. J.B. Pritzker for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic? Please explain. What, if anything, should he have done differently?

The COVID-19 pandemic is something none of us have experienced before, and without that experience to fall back on it is no surprise there have been problems. While I believe the Governor was initially sincere in his actions to protect our state, he has been unwilling or unable to adapt to the ever-changing situation. I am disappointed by the inability of the IDES system which has let down the 1 million Illinois citizens who lost employment. Many more lives have been impacted economically than by the actual disease and its equally important to find ways to recover. Such solutions come from cooperation, not executive orders or unilateral decisions.

3. In the wake of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, legislatures in some states have taken up the issue of police reform. Should Illinois do the same? If so, what would that look like?

We need to invest more into our police departments and into our policemen and policewomen. We must equip these first responders with the tools to handle situations without bias while providing the public increased accountability. It is important to think of public safety not just as policing, but an investment in community service. Continued police training and education, a refocus on community involvement, and the use of body cameras will help increase trust and accountability between officers and the community.

4. Should the Legislature pass a law requiring all law enforcement officers to wear

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Joshua Flynn, Illinois House 78th District Libertarian nominee

Candidate profile

Joshua Flynn

Running for: State Representative of District 78

Political party affiliation: Libertarian

Political/civic background: Campaign Consultant/Volunteer

Occupation: Insurance Consultant

Education: BA JARVIS CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

Campaign website: https://www.votejoshflynn.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/votejoshflynn

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/votejoshflynn

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/VoteJoshFlynn


The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board sent nominees for the Illinois House of Representatives a list of questions to find out their views on a range of important issues facing the state of Illinois and their districts. Joshua Flynn submitted the following responses:

1. The COVID-19 pandemic has hammered the finances of Illinois. The state is staring at a $6.2 billion budget shortfall in this fiscal year. What should be done? Please be specific.

I am completely against raising taxes as it will give us less revenue in the long run as we lose citizens and business. Illinois must make-up the shortfall with a combination of federal government support and reduction in state spending. I believe we must press the federal government to make up 80% of the shortfall in our state and other states and Illinois must reduce our spending by 20% of the shortfall ($1.24 billion).

2. What grade — “A” to “F” — would you give Gov. J.B. Pritzker for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic? Please explain. What, if anything, should he have done differently?

I would give Governor Pritzker an A. I believe he acted quickly and decisively to close Illinois and the results speak for his good work. He has opened the state prudently and deliberately.

3. In the wake of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, legislatures in some states have taken up the issue of police reform. Should Illinois do the same? If so, what would that look like?

Yes. Reform would look like this:

1. Improved pay and working conditions for police to keep its best people and attract more strong people to the force.

2. Enhanced training for all officers on the proper use of force, de-escalation techniques, and racial sensitivity.

3. Consistent community and police engagement so that police officers know the community and the community knows its officers.

4. Body cameras required for officers who interact with the public in the community or streets to protect officers and the community.

5. Police, court, and prison resources focused more on violent and property crimes and less on personal choice crimes like drug use and prostitution. The death of Breonna Taylor would have been avoided with a reduced focus on drug use crimes.

4. Should the Legislature pass a law requiring all law enforcement officers to wear body cameras? Why or why not?

Yes. the legislature should pass a law requiring all officers who interact with citizens to wear body cameras to protect themselves and protect citizens.

5. Federal prosecutors have revealed a comprehensive scheme of bribery, ghost jobs and favoritism in subcontracting by ComEd to influence the actions of House Speaker Michael Madigan. Who’s to blame? What ethics reforms should follow? Should Madigan resign?

The Illinois legislature has a history of corruption

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Harry Benton, Illinois House 97th District Democratic nominee

Candidate profile

Harry Benton

Running for: Representative House District 97

Political party affiliation: Democrat

Political/civic background: Trustee in the Village of Plainfield; Labor Caucus Director, Young Democrats of Illinois; Veteran’s Outreach of Illinois Board of Directors; Political Director, Young Democrats of Will County.

Occupation: Union Ironworker (Local 444)

Campaign website: harrybenton.com

Facebook: facebook.com/bentonforrep

Twitter: twitter.com/bentonforrep

Instagram: instagram.com/bentonforrep


The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board sent nominees for the Illinois House of Representatives a list of questions to find out their views on a range of important issues facing the state of Illinois and their districts. Harry Benton submitted the following responses:

1. The COVID-19 pandemic has hammered the finances of Illinois. The state is staring at a $6.2 billion budget shortfall in this fiscal year. What should be done? Please be specific.

This is an unprecedented moment in not only Illinois, but the nation as a whole. We have done so much as a state to fight against the pandemic, but as we go forward, we have many different challenges that we need to meet head on. Our main fiscal concern needs to be ensuring that we are spending where it is needed and cutting where it is not. Testing, schools, those who lost their jobs, and small businesses need to be at the forefront of our priorities, working to offset the massive losses they have all been dealt to ensure that as we safely reopen everyone is taken care of. The budget needs to be pulled apart word by word to ensure that the priorities of our constituents are being met. While we reorganize our priorities, the federal government needs to step up and support frontline states to ensure that the COVID-19 response is fully covered. President Trump and the Republicans have decided not to do that, choosing partisanship over relief.

2. What grade — “A” to “F” — would you give Gov. J.B. Pritzker for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic? Please explain. What, if anything, should he have done differently?

I think Gov. Pritzker has played the best hand with what he has been dealt. The way that the Republicans in the State and Federal government have decided that partisanship is more important than science makes Gov. Pritzker’s response all the much more impressive. We need to not forget while “grading” performance that we have lost more than 8,000 members of our community and the threat is still there to continue to lose more. I want to prioritize resources for all those affected by the pandemic, whether that be ensuring our front line workers are never worried about when they will get a new mask, or the small business owner in Plainfield that is working so hard to ensure that they are being safe, while still taking care of their workers. Gov. Pritzker has done well in a situation that no one had a blueprint for, and when I am elected, I will ensure that we are following the experts in all fields to make sure that Illinois comes

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