Ruth Bancroft Garden Honors Curator’s 40 Years Of Service

WALNUT CREEK, CA — Forty years into his dream job, Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery curator Brian Kemble is never entirely alone in his head as he goes about planting, hybridizing, photographing, documenting and building databases. He is still channeling, on a daily basis, the lovely, cactus-crazed lady who inspired, then hired him, back in 1980.

Kemble, 75, is the designated keeper of the flame lit by the late Ruth Bancroft, who over the course of decades turned her 3.5-acre plot of land in Walnut Creek into a world-renowned showcase for the variety, hardiness and beauty of ornamental, drought-tolerant plants.

A couple of weeks ago, Kemble’s colleagues at the garden surprised him by drilling a plaque in his honor into a large boulder on the premises. He can’t tell you what it says, exactly, because he hasn’t actually read it yet. But he was both thrilled and, yet again, a bit flummoxed by the reminder.

“It made me feel very glad that my efforts in the garden were appreciated,” he said. “And it also brought back to me the great burden that I feel, having had Ruth turn over the planting of the garden to me and my responsibility for making sure that her vision is adhered to, and the garden is in a good direction for the future.”

Gretchen Bartzen, executive director of the garden, notes that it became a nonprofit open to the public in 1992 as the first project of The Garden Conservancy, a national organization to preserve private gardens for public use that was inspired by Bancroft herself, who died in 2017 at the age of 109.

Photo courtesy of Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery, via Bay City News

Bartzen cites two factors that render the garden unique: “It was, as far as we know, one of the very first examples of an entirely drought-tolerant garden in the United States,” she said. “And also, her garden design was unusual at the time. She was one of the first people to ‘paint’ with plants – in other words, creating layers of textures – and she tried to imitate nature as much as possible.”

Painting with plants – really?

Kemble, now the resident “artist,” can take up that theme and run with it.

“That has to do with Ruth’s composing when she planted,” he insisted. “She would first put in the largest element, the big plants, the focal points. And then she would flesh in between them with patches of plants, and she could see it work like a mosaic, having a pool of orange over here and a pool of blue over there.

“One of the wonderful things about succulents,” he continued, “is the plants themselves often have multiple colors, not just when they’re in bloom, but the rosette that is orange or pink or blue, or what have you. And so they’re rending themselves, painting with plants.”

Kemble, a San Francisco resident, was both honoree and a presenter at Ruth Bancroft Garden’s annual fundraising

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Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nusery Honors Curator’s 40 Years Of Service

Forty years into his dream job, Ruth Bancroft Garden & Nursery curator Brian Kemble is never entirely alone in his head as he goes about planting, hybridizing, photographing, documenting and building databases. He is still channeling, on a daily basis, the lovely, cactus-crazed lady who inspired, then hired him, back in 1980.

Kemble, 75, is the designated keeper of the flame lit by the late Ruth Bancroft, who over the course of decades turned her 3.5-acre plot of land in Walnut Creek into a world-renowned showcase for the variety, hardiness and beauty of ornamental, drought-tolerant plants.

A couple of weeks ago, Kemble’s colleagues at the garden surprised him by drilling a plaque in his honor into a large boulder on the premises. He can’t tell you what it says, exactly, because he hasn’t actually read it yet. But he was both thrilled and, yet again, a bit flummoxed by the reminder.

“It made me feel very glad that my efforts in the garden were appreciated,” he said. “And it also brought back to me the great burden that I feel, having had Ruth turn over the planting of the garden to me and my responsibility for making sure that her vision is adhered to, and the garden is in a good direction for the future.”

Gretchen Bartzen, executive director of the garden, notes that it became a nonprofit open to the public in 1992 as the first project of The Garden Conservancy, a national organization to preserve private gardens for public use that was inspired by Bancroft herself, who died in 2017 at the age of 109.

Bartzen cites two factors that render the garden unique: “It was, as far as we know, one of the very first examples of an entirely drought-tolerant garden in the United States,” she said. “And also, her garden design was unusual at the time. She was one of the first people to ‘paint’ with plants – in other words, creating layers of textures – and she tried to imitate nature as much as possible.”


Painting with plants – really?

Kemble, now the resident “artist,” can take up that theme and run with it.

“That has to do with Ruth’s composing when she planted,” he insisted. “She would first put in the largest element, the big plants, the focal points. And then she would flesh in between them with patches of plants, and she could see it work like a mosaic, having a pool of orange over here and a pool of blue over there.

“One of the wonderful things about succulents,” he continued, “is the plants themselves often have multiple colors, not just when they’re in bloom, but the rosette that is orange or pink or blue, or what have you. And so they’re rending themselves, painting with plants.”

Kemble, a San Francisco resident, was both honoree and a presenter at Ruth Bancroft Garden’s annual fundraising gala, held virtually on Sept. 19. An art lover and an accomplished photographer whose camera skills developed in

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Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.


Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D




Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.

Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D



Item no:
133050001

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

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Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Inspirational gift is a tribute that honors Vietnam veterans! Pride and Brotherhood Wall Decor: patriotic military memorial!

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.

Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D

Item no: 133050001


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Erie County Tribute Garden honors domestic violence victims, survivors

On Saturday a celebration of the Tribute Garden’s fifth anniversary will be held. A poem will be unveiled on the stone steps of the berm.

TONAWANDA, N.Y. — Erie County’s Tribute Garden in Isle View Park is believed to be the first of its kind on public land. II’s designed to raise awareness around domestic violence while honoring victims and survivors.

Karen King of the Erie County Status of Women Commission there garden is “also a space where you can gather information through our kiosk and information about resources that are available in our community, if you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship and needs help.”  

According to the the National Coalition against Domestic Violence “domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and emotional abuse.”

On Saturday a celebration of the Tribute Garden’s fifth anniversary will be held. A poem will be unveiled on the stone steps of the berm.

It’s a true community project from beginning to end.

Cornell cooperative extension master gardeners offer service learning opportunities for for middle and high school  students.

“We believe it’s been instrumental in exposing the problem and also teaching young people what they can do if they know someone who is impacted by domestic violence and the resources that are available. it also helps d to support a program called teen relationship violence awareness program,” King said.

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