Amazon Discounted Kitchen Essentials from Le Creuset, Cuisinart, and Calphalon in Honor of Prime Day

Courtesy of Amazon

Because many of us are spending more time at home due to the global pandemic, we’ve all had extra time to experiment with new recipes. And as we approach the holiday season, there’s a good chance we’ll all be spending even more time in the kitchen. That means that there’s no better time than right now to stock up on new gadgets to help make all that cooking and baking even easier. After all, Amazon Prime Day is your best opportunity to invest in top-of-the-line products—so many excellent kitchen essentials are currently available at shockingly low prices.

Prime Day officially started today at midnight and runs until tomorrow at 11:59 p.m. PT. Within the 48-hour time period, Amazon Prime members can shop over one million deals on just about every category on the site. If you’d like to get in on the fun (think exclusive deals and free two-day shipping) without fully committing to a membership ($119 a year), you can sign up for a free 30-day trial.

Whether you want to upgrade your cookware or plan to try frying your Thanksgiving turkey this year, we’ve shuffled through the thousands of Prime Day deals to find which kitchen items are worth adding to your cart.

Related: 10 of the Best Amazon Prime Day Deals to Shop Right Now

Le Creuset Enameled Cast Iron Rectangular Griddle

This cast iron griddle requires no seasoning because of its enameled coating (which also evenly distributes and retains heat). Not limited to just pancakes and eggs, it can be used to sear steaks, bake desserts, and cook vegetables. What’s more, it comes in several vibrant colors great for holiday gift exchanges.

Shop Now: Le Creuset Enameled Cast Iron Griddle, from $89.99, amazon.com.

Toshiba Digital Toaster Oven with Convection Cooking

With temperatures ranging from 150 to 450 degrees Fahrenheit, this toaster oven can be used to cook and bake most anything you would prepare in a regular oven. It offers enough space to bake a 12-inch pizza, cook four pounds of chicken, and toast six slices of bread.

Shop Now: Toshiba Digital Toaster Oven, from $58.49, amazon.com.

Lodge Enameled Dutch Oven

This best-selling Dutch oven is extremely versatile, allowing you to cook both on the stovetop and in the oven. You can broil, braise, bake, fry, and roast all your favorite recipes inside this Dutch oven, then bring the entire dish straight to the table.

Shop Now: Lodge Enameled Dutch Oven, from $49.99, amazon.com.

Calphalon Premier Hard-Anodized Nonstick 8-Piece Cookware Set

If you’re due for a new cookware set, look no further than this superior collection. Complete with two fry pans, a saucepan with cover, a stockpot with cover, and a deep skillet with cover, this eight-piece set has everything you need to whip up a delicious meal. Plus, each piece is made with a three-layer nonstick interior, is oven-safe up to 450 degrees Fahrenheit, and can be cleaned in the dishwasher.

Shop Now: Calphalon Premier Hard-Anodized Nonstick

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NTEC Receives Highest Honor for Exemplary Mining and Reclamation from US Department of Interior

NTEC chose to rework marginal, legacy reclamation sites to create a stable landscape, ultimately allowing the land to be returned better than they found it

FARMINGTON, N.M., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the US Department of Interior’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) recognized Navajo Transitional Energy Company (NTEC) for their exemplary mining and reclamation work at the Navajo Mine. OSMRE awarded NTEC the agencies highest honor for activities that went above and beyond reclamation requirements to achieve superior results.

NTEC is the steward of the nearly 33,000 acre Navajo Coal Mine on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Traditional piecemeal reclamation began at the mine in 1970. When NTEC, a Navajo-owned company, purchased the mine in 2013 they inherited failing reclamation and unstable landforms, much of which had already been relinquished from jurisdictional oversight. The company immediately saw an opportunity to go above and beyond to correct the situation and do more than required to create a stable, sustainable landscape that mimics the natural erosion and deposition process of the Southwest.

Specifically, one site had been reclaimed to the previous applicable standard and was unnaturally eroding, while another site was lacking soil to shape and fill the area. However, the existing site configuration didn’t allow equipment the access necessary to perform reclamation work. NTEC and Bisti Fuels (NTEC’s contract miner) applied a creative solution to remedy both situations and allow for a watershed reclamation method.

The limiting infrastructure included electric rail structures (necessary to move coal from the pit to the power plant) and a local access road. The Company removed electric rail overhead lines and purchased diesel locomotives, as well as relocated a portion of the road. The new road location served the dual purpose of providing locals safe passage during the weather events. The new configuration allowed NTEC to correct the erosion problems with one pit, minimize impacts to previous reclamation, and move soils for future reclamation. Combined, these extraordinary efforts allowed for a large-scale effort that mimics a natural watershed and creates a sustainable restoration landscape.

This effort and approach is above and beyond what is required. “We took a site that has already been released from jurisdiction by the agency, and put it back in, because we knew we could do it better—we wanted to leave things better than we found them,” said Clark Moseley, CEO. “Doing the right thing is one of NTEC’s core behaviors. We have an obligation to our shareholders, the Navajo People. Our reclamation efforts present an opportunity to step up, do the right thing, at the right time, and create a better landform than what is required.”

OSMRE Principal Deputy Director Lanny E. Erdos, along with NTEC and Navajo Nation leadership toured the reclamation site this morning. The tour was followed be an award ceremony. “It is with great pleasure that I am here today to present the Navajo Transitional Energy Company with the 2020 Excellence in Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Award,” said OSM

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Thousands to honor Ginsburg in DC today; House passes bill to avert shutdown; 4 MLB teams clinch | Nation

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Today is Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. Let’s get caught up.

These non-virus headlines are in the news this morning: Thousands are expected to pay their respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court; the House passed stopgap funding aimed at averting a shutdown; and four MLB teams clinched playoff spots.

Read on for these stories, other top headlines, celebrity birthdays and more.

Top stories



Supreme Court Ginsburg

A memorial to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg includes a photograph of the late Justice, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, outside the Harvard Law School library at Langdell Hall, on the campus of Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass. 




Thousands expected to honor Ginsburg at Supreme Court

Thousands of people are expected to pay their respects at the Supreme Court to the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the women’s rights champion, leader of the court’s liberal bloc and feminist icon who died last week.

Even with the court closed to the public because of the coronavirus pandemic and Washington already consumed with talk of Ginsburg’s replacement, the justice’s former colleagues, family, close friends and the public will have the chance Wednesday and Thursday to pass by the casket of the second woman to serve on the Supreme Court.

The sad occasion is expected to bring together the remaining eight justices for the first time since the building was closed in March and they resorted to meetings by telephone. The latest coverage:

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House approves Medal of Honor for Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn Cashe, who saved seven in Iraq

Sept. 23 (UPI) — A House bill passed on Tuesday brings Army Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn Cashe, who died in 2005 after sustaining injuries in Iraq, a step closer to the Medal of Honor.

The bill, which passed the House on Tuesday by unanimous consent, was filed after Defense Secretary Mark Esper wrote on Aug. 24 that Cashe should receive an upgrade from the Silver Star he received, for his actions in Iraq in 2005, to the Medal of Honor.

Cashe pulled six fellow soldiers and their Afghan interpreter from a burning armored vehicle after a roadside bomb explosion, and later died in a Texas hospital, with third-degree burns on 72 percent of his body.

Cashe, from Oviedo, Fla., would be the first Black recipient of the Medal of Honor for service in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“We are one step closer to ensuring that Alwyn Cashe receives the Medal of Honor he earned,” Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., one of four sponsors on the bill, said in a statement on Tuesday.

In addition to Murphy, the bill was sponsored by Rep. Michael Waltz, R-Fla., and Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas.

“His bravery in the face of danger has inspired so many already, and this is a significant step forward to properly recognize him for his heroism,” said Waltz.

The bill waives the federally mandated time of five years between the award, the country’s highest military honor for valor, and the actions which prompted it. The rule is frequently waived but it takes a concerted effort by members of Congress to guide an exemption.

The sponsoring members have begun coordinating their efforts with Senate members, who must also approve the waiver before the president can officially award the honor.

“He is deserving of the Medal of Honor, our nation’s highest military award for bravery on the battlefield, and we urge that the Senate quickly follow suit and pass our bill to make sure that happens,” Crenshaw said.

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Former Daily Herald garden writer earns honor

Mary B. Good, who wrote a garden column for the Daily Herald called “The Potting Shed” for more than 20 years, was honored in August as a Fellow by Garden Communicators International, an association for professional communicators in the garden industry.

The Fellow award, given to members showing exceptional skill and dedication, tops a 53-year writing career that Good began after sending submissions to the Daily Herald for the Arlington Heights Garden Club and eventually being hired as a feature and garden writer. After moving to Wisconsin, Good continued writing her gardening column for two more decades. She has written for newspapers and magazines across the country, as well as five books, including her latest, “Skewed Flash Fiction: A Collection of 50 Freaky-Fast Reads.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

During her time in Arlington Heights, Mary started one of the first community organic gardens in the country. Mary’s service to the garden organization includes six years on the board of directors and four years as an officer.

When Mary learned she had been awarded this coveted honor, she said: “I haven’t been this excited since I was stalked by an anaconda in the Amazon.” The Amazon experience took place on an expedition to the Peruvian rainforest led by the late, world-renowned tropical bird artist, Chicagoan Richard Sloan, in a search for the bizarre, claw-winged hoatzin bird.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

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Proposed memorial garden would honor Roanoke homicide victims and provide a place of peace for families | Local News

Ryan Reilly described it as like ripples unfurling across water. The edges expand, flow, stretching outward on and on.

Grief is like that, he said. It shifts over time, changes, affecting more than you ever imagined.

“As it gets further and further out, it seemingly impacts people in all kinds of different ways,” he said.

“Unless you’ve been through something like it, I don’t know that anyone can really, truly understand what victims’ families go through,” he said. “But I do think that ripple effect and how it touches different people and how they can deal with it has a long-lasting effect, on a community as a whole.”

Reilly and his family found themselves plunged into grief in March when his cousin, Cassie Pizzi, 33, was killed in what would be the city’s fourth homicide case of the year.

Her death remains under investigation. Reilly, born in Roanoke but now living in Tennessee, described her loss as painfully tragic for those she left behind.

“It’s unfathomable,” he said in an interview. “Homicide takes a piece of people away when they lose that loved one.”

Reilly’s path through grief led him to a new idea, one that’s still taking shape but which he hopes can be a source of healing for families and the Star City itself.

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Father Creates Sunflower Garden to Honor Late Teen Daughter Who Lost Battle With Cancer

One man has taken his grief and turned it into new life as he has planted a garden to honor his daughter and wife who both passed away. Tony Brawner endured two heartbreaking losses. First, the passing of his daughter, Amy, from cancer when she was just 14 years old in 1997. Then, 12 years later, Brawner lost his wife.

He planted Amy’s Garden just last year to help him cope but now the sunflowers are now helping comfort Tony’s community.

About 40 people a day come by “Amy’s Garden” in Tennessee.

“I don’t want to be bitter, I have been at times, I’m not gonna deny that,” he admitted to Inside Edition Digital.

The garden was one way for him to process his loss and keep his loved ones close but also helping others enjoy the flowers with his daughter as the part of nature coming from the ground and her mom always close by as the butterfly in the area.

“I have a lot of faith and trust God’s plan is the way to go,” he said.

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White House to Award First Medal of Honor for Heroism in Fight Against ISIS

An Army sergeant major who bravely rescued 75 prisoners from the clutches of ISIS in Iraq will receive the military’s highest valor award on the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 territory attacks, the White House announced Thursday.

Sgt. Maj. Thomas “Patrick” Payne will receive the Medal of Honor Sept. 11 at the White House for his actions during a “daring nighttime hostage rescue” Oct. 22, 2015, while he was deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, the coalition fight against ISIS.

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Payne led a combined assault team in liberating hostages during two separate risky forays.

“With speed, audacity, and courage, he first led his team as they quickly cleared the assigned building, liberating 38 hostages,” the White House said in a statement. “Then, upon hearing a request for additional assault team members to assist with clearing the other building, Sergeant Payne, on his own initiative, left his secured position. He exposed himself to enemy fire as he bounded across the compound to the other building from which enemy forces were engaging his comrades.”

After engaging enemy fighters from the roof of that now-burning building, he returned to ground level, fighting his way toward the entrance in a race to save the hostages still inside. Others on the ground had been thwarted from entering due to the fire inside.

“Sergeant Payne knowingly risked his own life by bravely entering the building under intense enemy fire, enduring smoke, heat, and flames to identify the armored door imprisoning the hostages,” the White House statement reads. “Upon exiting, Sergeant Payne exchanged his rifle for bolt cutters and again entered the building, ignoring the enemy rounds impacting the walls around him as he cut the locks on a complex locking mechanism. His courageous actions motivated the coalition assault team members to enter the breach and assist with cutting the locks.”

Payne’s Medal of Honor award was first reported Sept. 2 by the Associated Press, which also reported that the hostages included Kurdish pershmerga fighters facing impending execution by ISIS militants.

For Payne, an 18-year soldier and the 2012 winner of the Army’s Best Ranger competition, the date of his medal presentation is significant, according to White House releases.

“Sergeant Major Payne is part of the 9/11 generation and joined the Army out of a sense of patriotism and duty to serve his country,” the announcement states.

It also notes that Payne comes from a tradition of service, with two brothers in the Army and Air Force. His wife, Alison, is a nurse.

“Growing up in Batesburg-Leesville and Lugoff, South Carolina, Sergeant Major Payne comes from what he characterizes as ‘small-town America,’ and his connection to his home state is a strong part of his personal identity,” the White House said.

Payne is also a Purple Heart recipient who sustained wounds from a grenade blast in 2010 during a deployment to Afghanistan. Though the wound was nearly “career-ending,” according to the

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