Workshop/APD and April Bovet Interior Design Team Up on a Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Gem

In the dining room, Eoos chairs ring a custom concrete table beneath a Rich Brilliant Willing pendant fixture. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Each of the five boroughs contains a constellation of neighborhoods with their own cultural quirks and pervading personalities. In Cobble Hill, ethnically diverse mom-and-pop shops and traditional brownstones entwine with a boho art scene, yielding an old-school yet forward-thinking Brooklyn vibe. It’s here that Workshop/APD founding principal Andrew Kotchen was given the opportunity to nestle a unique piece of architecture between two 1900s town houses, at once putting into relief the district’s dual natures.

GamFratesi stools pull up to the kitchen’s granite-topped island. Photography by Donna Dotan.

“It’s rare to get the chance to run an intelligent design process that isn’t based in historical preservation,” Kotchen says of the ground-up plan he conceived for his client, a married couple with two teenage children. After performing initial zoning studies, he and the WAPD team demolished the existing residence and inserted a modernist glass-and-steel town house, encompassing 7,000 square feet and four bedrooms across six floors. “We didn’t set out to take up every inch of buildable square footage,” Kotchen continues. “The focus was on creating comfortable, livable rooms.” Leveraging ideas from past projects with this client, he has devised, in its “calming simplicity,” an exemplar of the contemporary urban home.

White-oak built-ins backdrop an Antonio Citterio sofa and ottoman in the living room. Photography by Donna Dotan.

The streamlined program begins with a triple-height entry atrium that references elements from the facade. A screen of ebonized-oak slats rises the full 31 feet and then crosses the ceiling, the orientations nodding to the exterior’s vertical windows and horizontal Belgian bricks, which extend into the entry. Furthermore, the slat color links to the blackened steel framing those windows. It all functions as a sort of decompression chamber, providing a “gradual transition to and reveal of the
interiors,” Kotchen notes.

Slabs of honed Pietra Cardosa surround the main bathroom. Photography by Donna Dotan.

Beyond is the main living level, where the architect constructed volumes that flow and intersect seamlessly for maximum functionality. The kitchen is central, specially designed to support the client’s love of cooking and entertaining. Flanking it are the dining and living rooms, and directly behind its generous island is a clear path to stairs leading down to an expansive terrace and lawn for casual outdoor gatherings. Surfaces are clad in brushed stainless steel or black granite for textural nuance and durability. Extensive white-oak built-ins provide storage in the living room and conceal it in the dining room and kitchen. “We
approached the structure as a compositional explor­ation, using restraint to avoid over-embellishing,” Kotchen explains.

Carrie Crawford artwork and a bone-china pendant decorate the main bedroom. Photography by Donna Dotan.

It also provided a neutral envelope to backdrop the cadences of daily family life. April Bovet Interior Design was brought on to infuse the home with a
sophisticated palette that complements rather than competes with the

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Oliver Jackson-Cohen on Building His Own ‘Bly Manor’ Villain and Those ‘Hill House’ Comparisons

From ELLE

Spoilers for The Haunting of Bly Manor episode 7, “The Two Faces, Part Two,” below.

The Haunting of Bly Manor has no shortage of ghosts, apparitions and otherworldly villains, most of them working both as literal threats and metaphorical representations of guilt, grief, and denial. But the most memorable and complex of all the baddies haunting Bly Manor is Peter Quint, a suave Glaswegian valet who’s hiding a whole host of dark secrets behind his rakish smile.

After briefly appearing as a frightening specter haunting the manor, Quint is introduced in episode 3, “The Two Faces, Part One,” as a fantasy of an urbane 1980s man, shopping for tailored menswear and premium whiskey in west London to the sounds of Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love.” Even as the fantasy is undercut with the revelation that the luxury goods are for his boss, Henry Wingrave (Henry Thomas), Peter still retains an air of effortless confidence. That easy surface charm belies a dark, singleminded determination to get ahead at all costs—and to escape his own past, no matter who he takes down in the process. That charm also enthralls Wingrave’s newly hired au pair, Rebecca Jessel (Tahirah Sharif), whose tumultuous affair with Quint ends up destroying her.

Jackson-Cohen speaks to ELLE.com about Quint’s toxic relationship with Rebecca, the machismo he wears as a mask, and how he compares to The Haunting of Hill House‘s Luke Crain.

Luke really goes through the wringer in The Haunting of Hill House—heroin addiction, deep grief, a near-death experience—so you had a lot of heavy stuff to play. When you were approached to return for Bly Manor, was it important to you that Peter Quint be a very different kind of character?

On Hill House, Mike [Flanagan, series creator] used to always feel sorry for Luke and apologize [for] days when I had to be in floods of tears and all that. But it’s my job! It is my job, at the end of the day. So with this, Mike called me as he was standing outside the Netflix building, I think last February. Nothing had been announced, they were still talking about what they were going to do [with season 2]. He called me out of the blue and said “Hey, I’ve got this idea. It’s Turn of the Screw, do you want to be in it?” He said he wanted me and Victoria [Pedretti] to be in it. I went, “Yeah, of course, who do you want us to play?” And he went, “I don’t really know. I think Victoria will play the nanny and then we’ll figure it out with you.” Coming on that early was kind of incredible, because we got to develop Peter together.

What did that process look like?

Well, Mike initially said to me, “He’s the villain,” and my immediate response was, “Okay, but why?” In the book he is this kind of threatening specter, so how do we make him human?

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S.F. interior designer Jeff Schlarb conceptualizes penthouse in Nob Hill

A resplendent penthouse in Nob Hill awaits its next owner and showcases the vision of San Francisco-based interior designer Jeff Schlarb. Crowning the Crescent, the city’s newest collection of boutique residences, the three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bathroom penthouse that’s listed for $7.1 million is an artistic, inspirational oasis with more than 1,800 square feet of living space and 925 square feet of exterior space, with views of the Transamerica Pyramid, San Francisco Bay and Coit Tower.

“My vision in designing the penthouse at Crescent was to imagine a resident feeling inspired every time they enter their home,” Schlarb said. “We kept drawing upon the idea of creating a custom, romantic space that feels exciting and familiar at the same time, straddling a careful balance of maximalism and softness while honoring the unparalleled architecture and world-class design of this one-of-a-kind building and its residences. The color palette, in particular, draws upon nature and complements the stunning sky and bay sightlines visible from terraces that span the home.”

Schlarb furnished and designed the elegant penthouse, which complements the building’s architecture and features a flowing floor plan awash in natural light. The refined interior embodies California lifestyle through its sophisticated, stylish material palette and thoughtful design scheme.

The Crescent is the work of Grosvenor Americas, which is part of the Grosvenor Group and one of the world’s largest privately-owned property companies.

“We are excited to debut this model penthouse at Crescent, which is an idyllic interpretation of a contemporary luxury retreat located in one of the world’s greatest neighborhoods,” said Steve Buster, Senior Vice President of Development for Grosvenor Americas. “The home is an indoor-outdoor top-floor oasis, as residents have a privately accessed sprawling rooftop terrace overlooking downtown San Francisco and the Bay, along with two private terraces immediately off the living spaces. Crescent’s model penthouse personifies the romance of San Francisco and embodies exceptional design by the inimitable Jeff Schlarb, who has masterfully complemented interiors by renowned Champalimaud Design, in a building featuring world-class architecture by celebrated Robert A.M. Stern Architects.”

The penthouse’s seamless indoor/outdoor flow includes a 527-square-foot roof terrace boasting striking views of downtown San Francisco, landmarks and the water.

Schlarb’s ethereal, sophisticated and sophisticated design blends a variety of soft blues, teals and neutral tones contrasted by gold, glass and brass accents.

The penthouse opens to a formal foyer and hallway with a gallery wall featuring a curated selection of artwork including UNTITLED, a painting by Christoph Schrein by Saatchi Art. Schlarb’s design studio curated a piece of artwork for the foyer as well.. Speckled wallpaper by Rebecca Atwood in cloud blue adorns the ceiling and serves as a backdrop for a dramatic Ro Sham Beaux hanging pendant lights.

The foyer segues to open living and dining rooms designed for a modern sense of West Coast living. The living area’s highlights include a dynamic wall covering by Philip Jeffries, a sleek white Bernhardt bench, matte white ceramic chandelier, a custom blue sofa by JSDS Custom and a vintage coffee table from 1stdibs.

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Victoria Pedretti talks about Bly Manor’s hidden meanings and comparisons to Hill House

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

From Digital Spy

The Haunting of Bly Manor and Hill House spoilers follow.

Victoria Pedretti already had a few independent film credits to her name, but it was her turn as Eleanor “Nell” Crain (and the bone-chilling Bent-Neck Lady) in Netflix’s hit horror series The Haunting of Hill House that would prove to be her big break.

Not only was this acknowledged through award nominations, but Pedretti has continued to land starring roles in other popular shows – such as Netflix’s You – and on the big screen, taking on Mason family member Leslie Van Houten (better known as Lulu) in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

We recently had a phone interview with the star to talk about her most recent project: a return to the Haunting anthology with Bly Manor.

A loose adaptation of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, The Haunting of Bly Manor is narratively completely different to Hill House. It did, however, bring back much of its main cast. Alongside Victoria Pedretti, Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Henry Thomas and Kate Siegel are among the returning faces.

Photo credit: Netflix
Photo credit: Netflix

“It was an extremely different experience to Hill House,” Victoria Pedretti says of filming, during an exclusive chat with Digital Spy. “Compared to the first season, where Mike Flanagan directed every single one of the episodes, this season he directed the first episode and then we had all of these wonderful directors come in to work with us for the rest of them.”

The leading lady, who plays Bly Manor’s new au pair Dani Clayton, notes how “incredible” and “unique” they all were, but also reveals how each new director changed the process.

“The director’s work differently… So yeah that definitely kept us on our toes. It was kind of unfortunate because it felt like every time we were finally really getting into the swing of things, and really getting to know each other and how each other worked, before moving on to another director.”

With the immense popularity of Hill House, Bly Manor brought along with it some fairly high expectations. As such, Victoria admits that she “certainly” felt a level of pressure in returning to the franchise.

“I really want the fans to feel satisfied,” she tells us. “Not only that but I want them to continue to feel challenged and excited as they were in the first season. The first season took many risks I think, within the genre of horror, and that’s part of what intrigued so many people. So to continue to surprise people as well was something I had a lot of thoughts about.”

As demanding roles go, we imagined that working on a horror, where frame after frame requires nervous or tense energy, would have been somewhat exhausting.

“It was,” Victoria admits. “But I don’t think I fully realised how exhausting it was at the time – adrenaline is a really powerful thing that keeps you going.”

Telling us how she

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Captiva model at Hill Tide Estates showcases interior by Theory Design

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BOCA GRANDE — Theory Design’s Vice President of Design Ruta Menaghlazi has created a spectacular interior design for Seagate Development Group’s furnished Captiva model that is now open for viewing and purchase at Hill Tide Estates, a 9.98-acre gated enclave on the southern tip of Boca Grande being developed by Seagate.  Theory Design was named recipient of a 2019 Aurora Award for the Captiva’s interior in the Best Interior Design of a Home Priced over $2 million category.  Seagate was presented an Aurora Award for the Captiva in the Best Single-Family Detached Home Over 4,000 Square Feet category.  Priced at $5,995,000 with furnishings, the Captiva is one of three models available for purchase at Hill Tide Estates.  Seagate’s Bal Harbour model is currently under construction and BCB Homes’ Beacon model is in development.

Hill Tide Estates’ sales personnel are located in the Captiva model.  Showing appointments between 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday can be made by contacting Seagate’s Heath Seckel at 863.207.2586 or via email at [email protected] 

The Captiva model includes 4,865 square feet under air with 11,184 square feet under roof.  The ground level features two garages and a lower foyer.  The first living level includes a great room, island kitchen, and dining area that open to the lanai, a study, and the master suite.  The master bath features separate vanities, a free-standing tub, and a walk-in shower.  The second level presents three guest ensuites and a bonus room with a wet bar.  In addition to a pool and spa, the outdoor living area includes a pool bath, outdoor kitchen, and an outdoor dining area.  Ruta’s interior design for the Captiva conveys a coastal feeling.  Beige walls, blue and turquoise accents, and light oak flooring provide a connection to the community’s beachfront setting.

The Captiva’s lower foyer presents an open ceiling soaring to the top of the second living level.  A staircase leads to the great room where sliders open to the pool deck and outdoor living area.  The great room ceiling features beam details with tongue and groove trim.  The feature wall showcases a media console and a television flanked by art selections.  Furnishings include a sectional sofa, a console in white and medium wood tones, a cocktail table, a wicker end table, and wicker side chairs with light fabric. 

The kitchen’s island’s grey finish plays against a quartzite counter.  Barstools with tweed fabric and pendant lights provide a gathering place.  The perimeter cabinetry is finished in white and features upper cabinets with glass door fronts and windows at the back.  A gas Wolf range features a grey wooden hood.  Other appliances include a stainless-steel SubZero refrigerator/freezer, a Wolf microwave drawer, and two Asko dishwashers.  A

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Neglected Allison Hill garden will grow food and nurture neighborhood again, organizers hope

Harrisburg residents will get a preview Friday of a soon-to-be restored garden in the Allison Hill neighborhood.

“Our effort is to restore the entire area and return the whole thing into a functional use,” said Chris Nafe, the city’s sustainability coordinator. “We’re working on gathering resources to make it happen.”

Members of the Greenhouse Working Group have been spending hours preparing the land, raising funds, and educating nearby neighbors on their efforts to bring back the urban garden and eventually a new greenhouse to provide an option for healthy living in the city.

A virtual town hall on the “Greenhouse Transformation Project” is scheduled at noon Friday. It will be streamed to the city’s Facebook page, where residents’ input is welcomed. Some parts of the garden’s plans will start to take shape on Friday.

Planners said there’s an urgency to grow food now. The plot of land has sat near Reservoir Park off Whitehall Street in the city unused for two decades.

“If there’s one thing that COVID-19 taught us, it’s that we don’t eat healthy in Harrisburg,” said Rafiyqa Muhammad, a member of the group.

Muhammad spearheaded the project. She’s been a member of the city’s Environmental Advisory Council and is the owner of Sustainable Human Environment.

“In 2012, I and small groups of people would come up here to clean it up,” she said. “I had some farmers come up here to test the soil [and also] the USDA do some soil science testing, just to see what the ground was like.”

Through tilling and sampling, she said she feels confident that the garden will not only grow vegetables such as lettuce, cauliflower, and peppers but also produce flowers that are indigenous to the area.

Her vision of it includes garden beds, compost beds, raised garden beds, and more that can regenerate large amounts of fresh vegetables to help feed a good portion of the estimated 10,000 people who live in the Allison Hill area.

An existing greenhouse remains sitting on the land, but Muhammed said she’s not yet specifically seeking funds to build a new one.

“The goal is to make sure this is totally off the grid,” she said. “It shouldn’t be a burden to the city or the residents. Everything should be self-sustaining once it’s done.”

On Tuesday, while walking around the location, Nafe received news that the project received another $25,000 from the Whitt Family Foundation. So far, about $80,000 in cash has been raised toward the garden part of the project.

Around $100,000 has been given to help maintain aspects of the greenhouse for now. But, at least twice that amount is going to have to be raised to build a new greenhouse. Private investors have also given Muhammad the nod but are watching as the project develops.

“We’re looking at the future, the use of the greenhouse building, and restoration,” Nafe said. “Whatever money received so far, though, is going to be focused on the garden beds, and teaching classes to residents

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House hits pause on spending vote as Hill leaders resume talks

Congressional leaders are back at the negotiating table over the three-month stopgap — which is intended to punt any fiscal drama past Sept. 30 and until the lame-duck session — after talks broke down on Friday. While both parties appear to be coalescing around a Dec. 11 end date, Democrats and Republicans have squabbled for weeks over which funding and policy exceptions should be included in the continuing resolution, which would buy more time for negotiations on a broader spending deal.

A deal appeared to be coming together on Friday, including tens of billions of dollars in payments to farmers that Republicans sought in exchange for $2 billion in pandemic-related nutritional assistance that Democrats wanted.

But last-minute objections to the trade relief — including Democratic concerns that the president is leveraging the money to boost his reelection chances — tanked the talks. House Democrats ultimately released stopgap legislation on Monday that lacked both provisions, drawing the ire of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky,), who tweeted that it “shamefully leaves out key relief and support that American farmers need.”

Without a spending agreement, top Democrats and Republicans would find themselves exactly where they don’t want to be just weeks before the election — perilously close to the Sept. 30 deadline with no agreement to keep the government open.

Pelosi and McConnell have been adamant about avoiding another government shutdown under President Donald Trump and have supported a bill to extend funding through mid-December.

Senate Republicans on Monday said a lack of relief for farmers in the stopgap spending bill is problematic. But most stressed that it’s not worth shutting down the government in protest and said their side of the Capitol could still attempt to amend the bill.

“We could offer an amendment to try to put it back,” Senate Appropriations Chair Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said of the trade aid on Monday. “Or we could vote against the CR. But I’m for running the government. I’d prefer to keep the government running.”

Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee, slammed the lack of assistance for farmers. But when asked whether Republicans would shut down the government without it, he replied, “No.”

As of Friday, Democrats had dropped a request that would extend the Census Bureau’s Dec. 31 deadline to turn over apportionment data used to divvy up House seats to the president — potentially punting the final handling of census data to Democratic nominee Joe Biden if he’s elected this November.

Democrats had also failed to secure $3.6 billion in election security grants.

Source Article

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Theory Design creating interior for Bal Harbour model at Hill Tide Estates

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BOCA GRANDE — Theory Design’s Vice President of Design Ruta Menaghlazi is creating a spectacular interior design for Seagate Development Group’s furnished Bal Harbour model now under construction at Hill Tide Estates, a 9.98-acre gated enclave on the southern tip of Boca Grande being developed by Seagate. Priced at $6,900,000 with furnishings, the Bal Harbour is one of three models available for purchase at Hill Tide Estates.  Seagate’s completed Captiva model is open for viewing and also features an interior design by Ruta Menaghlazi.  Theory Design was named recipient of a 2019 Aurora Award for the Captiva’s interior in the Best Interior Design of a Home Priced over $2 million category.  Seagate was presented an Aurora Award for the Captiva in the Best Single-Family Detached Home Over 4,000 Square Feet category.  In addition to the Bal Harbour and the Captiva, BCB Homes’ Beacon model is in development.

Hill Tide Estates’ sales personnel are located in the Captiva model.  Showing appointments between 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday can be made by contacting Seagate’s Heath Seckel at 863.207.2586 or via email at [email protected] 

Designed by RG Designs, the three-level Bal Harbour floor plan includes 5,198 square feet under air on the two living levels.  The plan’s ground level entry and a front porch are flanked by two oversized garages.  In addition to the garage areas, the ground level includes massive storage spaces that are perfect for storing beach, fishing, and boating gear.  A ground level foyer provides access to an elevator and a staircase that lead to the living levels.  The first living level will showcase a spacious great room, an island kitchen, dining area, study, and a second master suite.  The entire living area, including the study and second master suite, open to a deck with a pool and spa, and to an outdoor living area with conversation and dining areas, an outdoor kitchen, and a pool bath.  The second living level features a bonus room with a wet bar, the master suite, and two VIP guest suites.  The bonus room, master suite, and one of the VIP guest suites open to a deck that will offer an ideal place to enjoy sunsets over the Gulf.  The deck overlooks the pool and outdoor living area. 

Ruta’s interior design for the Bal Harbour model will convey a relaxing combination of coastal, rustic, and modern styles.  The “at the beach” motif will be established by the home’s white windows and trim, a striking standing seam metal roof, and Hardy-Board siding.  Inside, white linen and soft grey wall tones will be contrasted by grey, navy blue, and pear green accents.  The color palette will play against brushed light oak hardwood flooring.  The

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