Stone house in Kalorama neighborhood had floor space hiding in the attic

“I kind of kept my eye out for something, and then I saw this house,” she said. “I grew up in a stone house. I love that.”

Architect John Edgar Sohl designed the house, and William P. Lipscomb built it for Mary Lawrence in 1926. Lawrence sold the house in 1937 to W. Campbell Armstrong, a lawyer. The next buyer was Emlen K. Davies, the first wife of Joseph E. Davies, former U.S. ambassador to Russia, who is perhaps better known as Marjorie Merriweather Post’s third husband. Davies was also the grandmother of U.S. Sen. Joseph D. Tydings (D-Md.)

Distinguished homes for sale in the D.C. region

Kalorama House | Architect Christian Zapatka designed the renovation of the 1926 stone house in the Kalorama neighborhood. It is listed at just under $5.6 million. (Studio Trejo)

Max Weinberg, drummer for Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, bought the house in 2016 with plans to renovate it. “I’ve bought and sold about 36 homes, lived in maybe like three of them,” Weinberg told the Wall Street Journal at the time.

But after renting it out for a year, Weinberg put it back on the market without renovating it. Ourisman scooped it up in March 2017.

“I went into the house and was like, ‘Wow, this would be a great project. It hasn’t been touched at all,’ ” she said. “But then what sold me on the house was I went up on this pull-down ladder thing to the attic and was like, ‘Oh my gosh, why is there so much space up here?’ ”

Ourisman hired architect Christian Zapatka, who has transformed several houses in the neighborhood. He discovered the original blueprints for the house.

“It’s not a huge footprint, but it’s a very gracious and elegant house,” he said. “The intention was to preserve and enhance the best of the historic components and then continue that staircase as if it had always been there, gaining a true third floor.”

The biggest challenge of the renovation was extending the curved staircase, with its brass handrail, not only up to the third floor but also down into the lower level. Ourisman said they went through about 10 scenarios before they figured out a way to make it look like it had always been there.

Using her family’s connections, Ourisman brought in Emily Bourgeois to design the kitchen and bathrooms and Ben Page of Page Duke Landscape Architects, who designed the grounds at the vice president’s residence, to plan the outdoor spaces.

By adding a third floor, Ourisman increased the size of the house by more than 2,000 square feet and gained two bedrooms.

But in this house, it is not just what was added but what was kept — brass hardware on the doors that sparkles like jewelry, architectural details in the living room and an opulent mirror above the living room fireplace.

“It has a bit of a Hollywood Regency quality,” Zapatka said of the mirror. “All that trim work in the living

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Can You Spot the Ring Hiding in the Garden?

This field of carrots and hungry bunnies is no place for a valuable diamond ring!

There are few feelings more irritating than knowing you’ve lost something valuable, especially when you have no idea where it is—say, your wedding ring. But when it’s just a hypothetical situation—say, a visual brain teaser—it can become a bit of fun!

That’s the purpose of this tricky visual puzzle from jewelry company William May. It challenges you to find the lost diamond ring in this garden. According to William May, the average amount of time it took people to spot the bling was 93 seconds—though it took one eagle-eyed participant only 20 seconds. See how long it takes you! Once you’ve found it, see if you can spot the single bear without a bow tie.

Note: This puzzle is not to scale. Also, for a little help, the ring’s band is yellow in color and has a pretty good-sized white diamond!

If you need a hint, this anecdote that inspired William May should help you narrow down your search. A woman in Canada once lost her ring—only to find it 13 years later in her garden, stuck around an overgrown carrot! (True story!)

Ready for the answer?

find the ring in the garden answer

Courtesy William May

Sure enough, it’s sitting right on top of a carrot toward the middle right of the image! It seriously blends in, doesn’t it?! Now, if only you could get a “solution image” for things you’ve lost in real life. If you’re ready to tackle another challenge, see if you can spot the difference in these 10 pictures.

Source:

  • William May: “LOST YOUR RING? THE GARDEN SHOULD BE THE FIRST PLACE TO CHECK”

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Belfast police find party-goers hiding in bathroom

Police investigating house parties in south Belfast found a group of people hiding in a bathroom early this morning.

Some of those present received community resolution notices, while the behaviour of others resulted in fixed-penalty notices.

It follows a series of arrests for a range of coronavirus-related offences in the Holyland district near Queen’s University over recent days.

And it comes as localised coronavirus restrictions are to be introduced in Belfast and Ballymena.

PSNI Chief Inspector Gavin Kirkpatrick said: “Some young people who have moved to the area to pursue their studies, and others visiting the area, are not listening to our repeated warnings.

“Alongside the universities and colleges, we have issued multiple appeals for young people to follow the latest health and safety advice and highlighted the importance of being good neighbours.

“Last night, we gave advice and guidance at a number of residential properties. However, 18 of those people we spoke with failed to understand the seriousness of the situation.”

Police issued 10 community resolution notices and eight fixed-penalty notices, which carry a £60 fine.

The PSNI have dedicated “substantial resources” to policing this area throughout the coming weeks and say they will “robustly” address any anti-social behaviour and criminal offences.

University classes are due to resume in the coming weeks.

Mr Kirkpatrick said: “Where appropriate, we now will liaise with the universities and colleges who will consider their own sanctions against any students involved.

“Our message is very clear: all students must follow the health and safety advice and specific guidance regarding houses of multiple occupancy provided by the universities.

“Only six people, from a maximum of two different households, can gather indoors in a private dwelling.”

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Group found hiding in bathroom as police break up Belfast house party

Police investigating house parties in South Belfast found a group of people hiding in a bathroom.

Some of those present early on Thursday received community resolution notices, while the behaviour of others resulted in fixed-penalty notices.

It follows a series of arrests for a range of coronavirus-related offences in the Holyland district near Queen’s University over recent days.

PSNI Chief Inspector Gavin Kirkpatrick said: “Some young people who have moved to the area to pursue their studies, and others visiting the area, are not listening to our repeated warnings.

“Alongside the universities and colleges, we have issued multiple appeals for young people to follow the latest health and safety advice and highlighted the importance of being good neighbours.

“Last night, we gave advice and guidance at a number of residential properties. However, 18 of those people we spoke with failed to understand the seriousness of the situation.”

Police issued 10 community resolution notices and eight fixed-penalty notices, which carry a £60 fine.

Police have dedicated “substantial resources” to policing this area throughout the coming weeks and say they will “robustly” address any anti-social behaviour and criminal offences.

University classes are due to resume in the coming weeks.

Mr Kirkpatrick said: “Where appropriate, we now will liaise with the universities and colleges who will consider their own sanctions against any students involved.

“Our message is very clear: all students must follow the health and safety advice and specific guidance regarding houses of multiple occupancy provided by the universities.

“Only six people, from a maximum of two different households, can gather indoors in a private dwelling.”

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Party-goers found hiding in bathroom as police issue fines for Holyland disorder

Police have issued eight fines and ten community resolution notices after student parties in the Holyland area of south Belfast.

t’s after they responded to a number of parties at houses in the area in the early hours of Thursday morning.

Police said they found a number of people hiding in a small bathroom to avoid detection when they visited their address.

The fixed penalty notices issued by police carry a £60 fine.

Chief Inspector Gavin Kirkpatrick said: “Some young people who have moved to the area to pursue their studies, and others visiting the area are not listening to our repeated warnings.

“Alongside the universities and colleges, we have issued multiple appeals for young people to follow the latest health and safety advice and highlighted the importance of being good neighbours.

“Last night, we gave advice and guidance at a number of residential properties. However, 18 of those people we spoke with failed to understand the seriousness of the situation. At one address, we discovered a group of people hiding in a small bathroom. Some received community resolution notices, while the behaviour of others resulted in fixed penalty notices. This follows a series of arrests for a range of offences in the area over recent days.

“Where appropriate, we now will liaise with the universities and colleges who will consider their own sanctions against any students involved.”

Police said all students must follow health and safety advice regarding houses of multiple occupancy provided by universities and emphasised that only six people from a maximum of two different households can gather indoors in a private dwelling.

“Students living off campus must also be mindful of the importance of building good relationships with local residents. They must be respectful of their neighbours who do not want to kept awake all night with parties and do not want to have their property damaged.

“Unfortunately residents have been through it all before. What might seem like fun at the time, can often cause others a great deal of upset and distress,” said Chief Inspector Kirkpatrick.

“We have dedicated substantial resources to policing this area throughout the coming weeks and will robustly address any antisocial behaviour and criminal offences.”

Belfast Telegraph

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