Smart Ways to Hang or Hide Paper Towel Rolls in Your Kitchen

Most of us reach for a roll of paper towels on the regular. Maybe you want to grease a baking pan, or perhaps you need to mop up a small spill—those are just a couple of the hundred or so reasons we might need a sheet or two. But paper towels are not something we want rolling around on the counter, but hiding them under the sink isn’t practical: No one wants to stoop down and dig through the cabinets every time there’s a spill. So, what are some of the best ways to store a roll of paper towels so that the kitchen essentials are on hand but not in the way? We’ve divided possible options into four main types—countertop holders, under-counter hangers, wall-mounted holders, and over-the-cabinet-door holders—so you can find the solution that will work best for your kitchen.



a plate of food on a table: Courtesy of Food52/Rocky Luten


© Provided by Martha Stewart Living
Courtesy of Food52/Rocky Luten



a plate of food on a table: Wrangle your roll so it's easy to grab but not in the way.


© Courtesy of Food52/Rocky Luten
Wrangle your roll so it’s easy to grab but not in the way.

Related: Sustainable Alternatives to Paper Towel

Countertop

When you use a countertop holder, you’re committing to keeping your roll of paper towels in view. Choose a style that echoes the look of your kitchen, whether that means a simple maple wood holder ($48, food52.com), going with a classy gold option ($59, williams-sonoma.com), or bringing home a sleek metal version ($24.99, amazon.com) to suit your more contemporary space. (This style of countertop holder has a tension arm to help you pull just one sheet at a time.). Another option: Repurposing an antique washer plunger or other vintage item to hold your roll.



a close up of a towel hanging on the wall: Courtesy of Schoolhouse


© Provided by Martha Stewart Living
Courtesy of Schoolhouse

Wall Mounted

If you don’t have the counter space or don’t want to add another item to your counters, a wall-mounted paper towel holder is the obvious solution. Look for a holder that will last and is easy to change the roll on, plus easy to use. There are lots of utilitarian options that blend in ($14.99, bedbathandbeyond.com), but there are also sturdy ones that make a statement ($119, schoolhouse.com) all on their own. Some require drilling into the wall to install, but if you’re living in a rental or not ready to commit, you’ll find magnetic paper towel holders ($19.99, containerstore.com) work well, but are generally not as sturdy. You’ll need to be gentle with this iteration. Most wall mounted holders are horizontal but there are some vertical models if that fits your space or style better. For a statement-making wall-mounted paper towel holder, a vintage ice pick setup can’t be beat ($83, etsy.com).



a kitchen with a sink and a mirror: Courtesy of Yamazaki Home


© Provided by Martha Stewart Living
Courtesy of Yamazaki Home

Under Cabinet

A paper towel is always on hand when you have an under-cabinet holder. Styles range from clip on ($32, macys.com) to those that require some installation, often with screws through the base of the shelf or upper cabinet ($13.42, amazon.com). Consider the profile of the holder when you have a

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House Committee Says State Dept. Tried to Hide Civilian Casualties in Arms Sales Report

The House foreign affairs committee released documents that its chairman said shows the State Department tried to “hide the truth” from Congress on the 2019 emergency declaration to seal more than $8 billion in arms sales to Gulf countries.



Joe Wilson, Eliot Engel are posing for a picture: Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks about a trip to Israel and Auschwitz-Birkenau as part of a bipartisan delegation from the House of Representatives on January 28 in Washington, DC. Engel released documents yesterday showing the State Department’s attempt to hide facts in the arms sales report into the 2019 sale of military equipment to three Gulf states


© Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks about a trip to Israel and Auschwitz-Birkenau as part of a bipartisan delegation from the House of Representatives on January 28 in Washington, DC. Engel released documents yesterday showing the State Department’s attempt to hide facts in the arms sales report into the 2019 sale of military equipment to three Gulf states

In a release, Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY), chairman of the House panel, criticized Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs R. Clarke Cooper, who is due to appear before the committee on Wednesday.

Cooper recommended in a July 10 memo to the department’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) that it “consider removing” from its inspection report an annex on civilian casualties to “resolve significant factual errors” which “may take time.”

Doing so would “allow that Report to be finalized, briefed to Congress, and released to the public,” Cooper wrote to Sandra Lewis, assistant inspector general for inspections at the OIG.

“The records we received today show just how hard the State Department wanted to hide the truth about last year’s phony emergency declaration,” Engel said in a statement.

“The picture is starting to come into focus: a top priority at Mike Pompeo’s State Department was to go around Congress to sell weapons, and his senior aides worked hard after the fact to obscure their indifference to civilian casualties.”

The documents also show that Cooper and State’s Deputy Legal Adviser Joshua Dorosin requested the OIG redact parts of the report on the grounds of “potential executive privilege concerns,” which the foreign affairs committee called “vague.”

The OIG responded to the request to say that “citing ‘potential Executive Privilege concerns’ does not properly invoke a claim of privilege that would justify the withholding of information that is otherwise appropriately released to the Congress and/or the public”.

Moreover, the OIG said some of the State Department’s “overly broad” requests for redaction appeared not to conform to U.S. Government practices for making redactions, including the department’s own Freedom of Information Act regulations.

It also said the redaction requests were applied inconcsistently across the report.

In May 2019, Pompeo issued an emergency declaration, bypassing congressional review requirements on arms sales, to sell military equipment to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

Congress had blocked the $8 billion in sales to the three Gulf states, citing concerns about the actions of the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen since 2015, including the high rates of civilian casualties caused by airstrikes using U.S.-supplied supplied weapons.

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