Military Police Considered Using Heat Ray on White House Protesters, Whistle-Blower Says

Top administration officials have defended the response to the protests, arguing that law enforcement officers in the square in the days leading up to the clash had been met with violence from bad actors. Testifying before Congress in July, Gregory T. Monahan, the Park Police’s acting chief, said that his officers acted with “tremendous restraint.”

Top Republican lawmakers, as well as Attorney General William P. Barr, have previously sought to discredit Major DeMarco, noting that he ran as a Democratic House candidate in 2018.

Major DeMarco, who also testified before the House Committee on Natural Resources as part of the panel’s investigation into the clash, offered a starkly different picture, telling lawmakers that the police used “excessive” force on protesters.

The heat ray that officials had sought was developed with the intent of repelling individuals without injury. But military news releases describe the technology as causing an “unbearable heating sensation,” and a system deployed to Afghanistan with the Air Force in 2010 ultimately was never used and was withdrawn, in part, some speculated, because of public opposition.

In a meeting days before the 2018 midterm elections, Customs and Border Protection officials suggested using the device on migrants at the southwestern border, but the idea shocked attendees, and Kirstjen Nielsen, then the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, angrily dismissed the idea outright.

Major DeMarco, in his written testimony, also told lawmakers that military officials had sought out powerful sound cannons known as Long Range Acoustic Devices, which can be used to loudly issue commands to crowds but can also serve as a deterrent. A federal judge in New York ruled in 2017 that the sound the cannons emit could be considered a form of force, after the police used such a device to emit a series of piercing beeps directed at protesters who later said they had developed ringing in their ears and dizziness because of the noise.

Zolan Kanno-Youngs and John Ismay contributed reporting.

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Federal officials considered using ‘heat ray’ on protesters outside White House, military whistleblower says

A military whistleblower says federal officials sought some unusual crowd control devices — including one that’s been called a “heat ray” — to deal with protesters outside the White House on the June day that law enforcement forcibly cleared Lafayette Square.

In written responses to questions from a House committee, National Guard Maj. Adam DeMarco said the Defense Department’s lead military police officer for the National Capital Region sent an email asking if the D.C. National Guard possessed a long-range acoustic device — used to transmit loud noises — or an “Active Denial System,” the so-called heat ray.

DeMarco said he responded that the Guard was not in possession of either device. National Public Radio and The Washington Post first reported DeMarco’s testimony.

Use of either the acoustic device or the Active Denial System would have been a significant escalation of crowd control for the Guard members, particularly since the Defense officials ordered that the Guard troops not be armed when they went into D.C.

Law enforcement personnel were armed. And although active-duty military troops were sent to the region, they remained at bases outside the District in case they were needed but never actually entered the District.

The Active Denial System was developed by the military nearly two decades ago, and was unveiled to the public around 2007. It’s not clear that it’s ever actually been used in combat, although there are reports it has deployed.

The system, which emits a directed beam of energy that causes a burning heat sensation, was considered a non-lethal way to control crowds, particularly when it may be difficult to tell the enemy from innocent civilians in war zones. Use of the device appeared to stall amid questions about whether it actually caused more serious injuries or burns than initially thought.

The Long Range Acoustic Device, also called a sound cannon, sends out loud messages or sounds and has been used by law enforcement to disperse crowds. The U.S. military has, in recent years, ordered the LRAD for the Navy’s Military Sealift Command to be used by ships to hail or warn other vessels.

DeMarco testified in late July before the House Natural Resources Committee, which is investigating the use of force against crowds in Lafayette Square that night. His remarks on the crowd control devices came in response to follow-up questions from the committee. DeMarco’s lawyer sent his answers to the committee on Aug. 28; NPR posted the document online Wednesday.

The Trump administration has said that vicious attacks by protesters led federal forces to turn on what appeared to be a largely peaceful crowd June 1 in the square in front of the White House. Law enforcement and security officers that night clubbed and punched protesters and unleashed mounted officers and chemical agents against them in one of the most controversial confrontations at the height of this year’s nationwide protests over the killing of Black people at the hands of police.

The forceful clearing of Lafayette Square, long one of the

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US military police ‘sought use of heat ray’ to disperse White House protesters | US policing

A military whistleblower has said federal officials sought some unusual crowd control devices, including a so-called heat ray, to disperse protesters outside the White House in June.

In written responses to questions from a House committee, the national guard major Adam DeMarco said the defence department’s lead military police officer for the national capital region sent an email asking if the Washington DC national guard possessed a long-range acoustic device used to transmit loud noises or an Active Denial System (ADS), the so-called heat ray.

DeMarco said he responded that the guard was not in possession of either device. National Public Radio and the Washington Post first reported DeMarco‘s testimony.

Use of either the acoustic device or the ADS would have been a significant escalation of crowd control for the guard, particularly since the defence officials ordered that guard troops not be armed when they went into the area. Law enforcement personnel were armed.

Athough active-duty military troops were sent to the region, they remained at bases outside the district in case they were needed.

The ADS was developed by the military nearly two decades ago and was unveiled to the public around 2007. It is not clear if it has ever been used in combat, although reports suggest it has been deployed.

The system, which emits a directed beam of energy that causes a burning sensation, was considered a non-lethal way to control crowds, particularly when it may be difficult to tell the enemy from innocent civilians in war zones.

Use of the device appeared to stall amid questions about whether it actually caused more serious injuries or burns than initially thought.

The long-range acoustic device, also called a sound cannon, sends out loud messages or sounds and has been used by law enforcement to disperse crowds.

The US military has, in recent years, ordered the cannon for the navy’s Military Sealift Command to be used by ships to hail or warn other vessels.

DeMarco testified in late July before the House natural resources committee, which is investigating the use of force against crowds in Lafayette Square that night. His remarks on the crowd-control devices came in response to follow-up questions from the committee.

DeMarco’s lawyer sent his answers to the committee on 28 August; NPR posted the document online Wednesday.

The Trump administration hasclaimed vicious attacks by protesters led federal forces to turn on what appeared to be a largely peaceful crowd on 1 June in the square in front of the White House.

Law enforcement and security officers that night clubbed and punched demonstrators and set mounted officers and chemical agents against them in one of the most controversial confrontations at the height of this year’s nationwide protests over the killing of black people at the hands of police.

The forceful clearing of Lafayette Square, long one of the country’s most prominent venues for demonstrations, came minutes before Donald Trump arrived in the area, en route to stage a photo event in front of a historic church

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Military police inquired about heat rays for use on White House protesters: report

A senior military police officer in the Department of Defense for the D.C. region has questioned whether the National Guard had access to a military heat-ray mechanism that could have been used to disperse protesters outside the White House on June 1.

Documents obtained from the whistleblower, Maj. Adam DeMarco of the D.C. National Guard, show that the Provost Marshal of Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region copied him on an email, inquiring about a long range acoustic device known as LRAD, as well as an Active Denial System (ADS), NPR reported.

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The ADS is a controversial device designed by the military 20 years ago that heats human skin once it comes into direct contact with it, making people immediately want to flee an area.

The mechanism was designed to disperse crowds or targets, without the use of lethal force, NPR reported.

“ADS can provide our troops a capability they currently do not have, the ability to reach out and engage potential adversaries at distances well beyond small arms range, and in a safe, effective, and non-lethal manner,” the Provost Marshal’s email said. “The ADS can immediately compel an individual to cease threatening behavior…[and] provides a sensation of intense heat on the surface of the skin.”

Demonstrators, who had gathered to protest the death of George Floyd, begin to run from tear gas used by police to clear the street near the White House in Washington, Monday, June 1, 2020. (Associated Press)

Demonstrators, who had gathered to protest the death of George Floyd, begin to run from tear gas used by police to clear the street near the White House in Washington, Monday, June 1, 2020. (Associated Press)

“The effect is overwhelming, causing an immediate repel response by the targeted individual,” the email reportedly added.

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DeMarco, who has sought whistleblower protection, said that “the D.C. National Guard was not in possession of either an LRAD or an ADS,” so neither were used against protesters.

The email that DeMarco was copied on, was sent out the same day that tear gas and smoke grenades were used on the protesters near the White House, prior to President Trump posing with a Bible outside St. John’s Episcopal Church on 16th Street, the area that has since been named Black Lives Matter Plaza.

The recent protests were not the first time government officials have considered using the ADS device outside of military use.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection reportedly suggested using the devices to deter migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border during a meeting with then-Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, The New York Times reported.

But Nielsen “would not authorize the use of such a device,” and stressed that “it should never be brought up again in her presence,” an aide said, according to the Times.

Fox News could not immediately reach the Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region for comment.

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Military leaders asked about using heat ray on protesters outside White House: report

The military police officer with jurisdiction over the Washington, D.C., region inquired about whether the D.C. National Guard had access to a military heat ray for use against protesters in June, according to emails obtained by NPR.

Major Adam DeMarco of the D.C. National Guard told the House Committee on Natural Resources that the Provost Marshal of Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region copied him on an email, seeking an Active Denial System (ADS).

The ADS is designed to heat human targets using millimeter wave technology, according to NPR. Both its effectiveness and the ethics of using it have been controversial since its development decades ago.

The Provost Marshal’s email stated that the “ADS can provide our troops a capability they currently do not have, the ability to reach out and engage potential adversaries at distances well beyond small arms range, and in a safe, effective, and non-lethal manner.”

The device “provides a sensation of intense heat on the surface of the skin. The effect is overwhelming, causing an immediate repel response by the targeted individual,” he added.

The Provost Marshal also requested a long-range acoustic device (LRAD), a sound cannon frequently used to disperse crowds.

Under a 2015 settlement, federal police are required to give large crowds multiple advance warnings to disperse, loudly enough to be heard from blocks away. The LRAD is typically used in such scenarios. The LRAD was not used on June 1, and protesters who were in Lafayette Square said police gave little to no warning.

DeMarco, who has since sought whistleblower protection, responded that “the D.C. National Guard was not in possession of either an LRAD or an ADS.”

The email chain was sent hours before officers deployed tear gas and smoke grenades against protesters in Lafayette Square. After the square was cleared, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn’t think he could’ve done more to stop virus spread Conservative activist Lauren Witzke wins GOP Senate primary in Delaware Trump defends claim coronavirus will disappear, citing ‘herd mentality’ MORE was photographed holding a Bible in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church.

The Hill has reached out to Joint Force Headquarters National Capital Region for comment.

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4 Low-Maintenance Kitchen Countertops That Can Stand the Kitchen Heat

Kitchen countertops are an important part of every kitchen. Whenever you decide to spruce up the kitchen area, it is important to consider the kitchen countertop. Building custom custom kitchen cabinets and installing new appliances will not give a great look to the kitchen if the countertop continues to look dull and tattered.

Do not worry about the cost of kitchen countertops. If you choose the right countertop after thorough consideration, it will last a lifetime. So, it is best to invest in one that lasts for a long time and does not demand maintenance. Choose a low maintenance countertop that can stand the kitchen heat.

Low-Maintenance Kitchen Countertops: Multiple Options for you

Here are a few options that are low on maintenance and high on style:

  1. Engineered Quartz

Granite and marble are popular materials for kitchen countertops. However, things are changing fast with the new kid on the block: Engineered Quartz. It is made up of 90-95% natural quartz stone with 5-10% resins, polymers and other pigments. It is available in a wide variety of colors. The surface isn't porous which makes it ideal for kitchen surfaces. It is stain-resistant and easy to clean.

  1. Soapstone

A natural quarried stone, soapstone has a soapy surface. It is a metamorphic rock rich with talc. A soapstone kitchen countertop usually has a lower talc content making it durable and ideal for withstanding the kitchen heat. It is not a very hard material. So, it is easy to cut and shape according to your requirements. It is heat-resistant, stain-resistant and does react with acidic materials. But, remember that the material can develop scratches over a period of usage, so you must sand it every few years.

  1. Laminate

Laminate countertops are made up of plastic. It contains a very hard particle board with layers of plastic laminate bonded around it. It is ideal for a cooking space because it is tough and long-lasting. Also, it can simulate the look of expensive countertop materials such as granite and marble. It is easy to clean and does not require sealing. Also, it is available at a very low-cost which means you can change it every couple of years without undertaking a financial burden.

  1. Solid Surface

It is a man-made material containing marble dust, bauxite, acrylic, and epoxy or polyester pigments. DuPont introduced the solid surface material in 1967 under the brand name Corian. Since then, many manufacturers offer the low-maintenance kitchen countertop under different names. It is heat-resistant and moisture-resistant but, you have to take care of it as it is not tough against stains.

Which one is the Right Kitchen Countertop for your Home?

When it comes to choosing a low-maintenance kitchen countertop, one man's trash is another man's treasure. Your choice may not match your friend's choice. So, when you are making a decision about choosing a countertop that can stand the heat, you must understand your requirements properly. And, choose one that fits your requirements.

Consider the layout and the design scheme of …

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Despite July Heat, There Is Still Time to Add to the Garden

While July is typically too hot to add most vegetables and flowers to the garden, some plants do surprisingly well when planted in the summer heat.

Plant Hibiscus: Hibiscus trees love heat and will quickly take root when planted in July. Plant in nutrient rich, well-draining soil. Deeply water the tree so the roots remain moist for the first two weeks after planting. Hibiscus flowers only last a day, but new flowers are quick to take their place. Hibiscus can also be planted in pots.

Plant Beans and Squash: While most vegetables should already be producing in July, add corn, cucumber, lima beans and summer squash now for a late summer, early fall harvest.

Plan Your Watering Routine: Although water restrictions have now been lifted, still conserve. Set lawn sprinklers for early morning – 6: 00 am or earlier, three times a week for 15 minutes. This will enable the water to reach the roots and help reduce evaporation once the sun comes up.

Eliminate Snail Damage Naturally: Snails love to eat their way through tender vegetable leaves, which can damage or kill the plant. Place natural barriers around your garden to keep the snails away. Since they move by sliding on smooth surfaces, place crushed eggshells or diatomaceous earth (an abrasive sedimentary rock) around plants. Mulch is another good snail deterrent because it is made of rough wood chips.

Keep Deadheading Flowers: Summer is the time of year when flowers want to grow. Give new buds the maximum nutrients they need by removing fading or dead flowers daily. This way, plants will focus their energy on new growth.

Plant Shrubs: One way to easily fill out a yard is by planting shrubs. Use them as groundcover or low hedges. Easy-to-maintain, low water users are Lily-of-the-Nile, Star Jasmine, Indian Hawthorn, New Zealand Flax, Rosemary and Mediterranean Pink Rockrose. All will need regular watering until established.

Fill In Your Flower Garden: Add summer-to-fall bloomers like alyssum, marigolds, petunias, red sage, verbena, vinca and zinnias to your garden as other plants slow their flower production. Flowers that do well in shade are amethyst, begonia, coleus, geranium and impatiens.

Replenish Mulch: To help cut down on water use, add a 3-inch layer of mulch around plants and trees. The mulch keeps water in and roots cool even during the hottest times of the day.

Unlike plants and trees that enjoy the heat, begin your gardening day early before temperatures rise to unbearable highs.

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