Hasbro Children’s Hospital Completes New Healing Garden and Playground

PROVIDENCE, R.I., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Hasbro Children’s Hospital announced the completion of the Balise Healing Garden and reimagined playground. The space was made possible by donor support and generous gifts to the Every Child, Every Day campaign, and partners Starlight Children’s Foundation, CVS Pharmacy, Colgate-Palmolive Company, and TerraCycle.

“We know there’s a correlation between spending time outside and the healing journey for children – that a place for respite brings normalcy to a child’s hospital stay,” said Timothy J. Babineau, MD, President and CEO of Lifespan. “We are thankful to all of our incredible supporters whose generous philanthropy made this transformation a reality. Hasbro Children’s has truly been built by our community, for our community.”

Located outside the hospital’s lower level, the Balise Healing Garden and conjoined playground are 29,000 sq. ft. and feature a raised bed teaching garden and re-worked Healing Arts Theatre with stadium-style benches and chimes and drums for patients to express themselves.

The playground, including swings and a climb-on structure with a wheelchair accessible slide, is located nearby. Built on a cushioned base, the equipment is constructed from recycled materials, including oral care products collected through a nationwide recycling initiative. For 3-months, consumers were asked to recycle their oral care products through CVS Pharmacy and TerraCycle to help their state win a playground for a Starlight partner pediatric facility. Rhode Island recycled more waste than any other state, and Hasbro Children’s received the grand prize.

“We were able to help build this wonderful playground for families at Hasbro Children’s while incentivizing recycling among our CVS Pharmacy customers,” said Eileen Howard Boone, SVP of Corporate Social Responsibility & Philanthropy and Chief Sustainability Officer at CVS Health. “It’s a win-win for everyone, most importantly the countless children who will enjoy the playground for years to come.”

The Balise Healing Garden and the playground were completed late September and follows current COVID-19 health and safety guidelines.

Media Contact: Cristine Lovato, (626) 824-0325, [email protected]

About Hasbro Children’s Hospital
Hasbro Children’s Hospital, part of the Lifespan health care system, is the premier pediatric facility for clinical care, research and education for Rhode Island and southeastern New England. A private, not-for-profit institution, it is the pediatric division of Rhode Island Hospital, a teaching hospital of The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Hasbro Children’s Hospital is designated as a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center by the American College of Surgeons.

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SOURCE Starlight Children’s Foundation

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Healing Garden continues to grow with the help of volunteers

The sweat is as thick on his brow as the sentiment is in his voice.

Eddie Schmitz pulls out his cellphone to underscore why he’s here on this Tuesday morning in September, the temperature steadily rising in unison with the emotion with which he speaks.

On its screen flashes a picture of a Canadian mother of two.

She lost her life on Oct. 1, 2017.

“Yesterday, it was Tera Roe’s birthday,” Schmitz says of the Route 91 Harvest festival shooting victim. “On my Facebook page, every single birthday, they’re honored on my page,” he notes, scrolling through one memorial after the next. “Every single one of them.”

Healing Garden volunteers Sue Ann Cornwell, left, and Alicia Mierke work Sept. 14 on restoring ...
Healing Garden volunteers Sue Ann Cornwell, left, and Alicia Mierke work Sept. 14 on restoring memorial trellises for victims of the Route 91 Harvest festival shooting. (Elizabeth Page Brumley / Las Vegas Review-Journal)

Schmitz stands in the center of the Healing Garden, the verdant downtown oasis created in honor of those who died during the tragedy in question, populated by 58 trees for 58 victims (There is talk of adding a memorial to the garden to honor any further victims, as there is no room for any more trees).

Built in just five days after the worst night in the city’s history, it stands as a testament to a community coming together in a time of unprecedented sadness and loss, an enduring patch of serenity catalyzed by the opposite.

“Over 400 people were working 24 hours a day to build that from nothing, from a little plot of land that the city owned,” Mayor Carolyn Goodman says. “They worked around the clock. It’s a beautiful thing.”

As the third anniversary of the massacre approaches, the garden is undergoing a transformation — cement is being poured; cinder blocks are being stacked.

It’s doing so largely at the hands of Schmitz and Oct. 1 survivor Sue Ann Cornwell, an Army veteran and a retired school bus driver, respectively. They spend six to eight hours between them here nearly every day, volunteering their time.

It hasn’t been easy.

Until recently, there had been issues with the local homeless population.

“There’s a lot about the garden that’s inviting to everybody, and so it was inviting to folks who are more down-and-out and in need of a little bit more help than some others,” explains Mauricia Baca, executive director of Get Outdoors Nevada, which oversees the maintenance of the Healing Garden. “But that creates some complications because when somebody is essentially living in a place like the garden, there are no bathroom facilities there, and so that creates some really specific problems.”

Schmitz puts it less delicately.

“It was just bad,” he recalls. “There were needles in here. It was bad.”

But through his and Cornwell’s efforts — as well as some teamwork with Baca and the city of Las Vegas — they’re ushering in a new era for the garden.

Theirs is a story of two friends with one aim: to keep alive the memories of those

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The Secret Garden and the healing power of nature

Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden has been described as “the most significant children’s book of the 20th century.”

First published in 1911, after being serialised in The American Magazine, it was dismissed by one critic at the time as simple and lacking “plenty of excitement”. The novel is, in fact, a sensitive and complex story, which explores how a relationship with nature can foster our emotional and physical well-being. It also reveals anxieties about national identity at a time of the British Empire, drawing on ideas of Christian Science.

The Secret Garden has been read by generations, remains a fixture on children’s publishing lists today and has inspired several film versions. A new film, starring Colin Firth, Dixie Egerickx and Amir Wilson, updates the story in some ways for modern audiences.

2020 movie still, a tree covered in pink flowers
A scene from the new movie version of the book.
Studiocanal

The book opens as nine-year-old Mary Lennox is discovered abandoned in an Indian bungalow following her parents’ deaths during a cholera outbreak. Burnett depicts India as a site of permissive behaviour, illness and lassitude:

[Mary’s] hair was yellow, and her face was yellow because she had been born in India and had always been ill in one way or another.

Mary is “disagreeable”, “contrary”, “selfish” and “cross”. She makes futile attempts at gardening, planting hibiscus blossoms into mounds of earth. The Ayah tasked with caring for Mary and the other “native servants … always obeyed Mary and gave her her own way in everything.”

On the death of her parents, Mary is sent to live with her reclusive uncle Archibald Craven at Misselthwaite Manor in Yorkshire.

Mary’s arrival in England proves a shock. The “blunt frankness” of the Yorkshire servants – in contrast to those in India – checks her behaviour. Martha Sowerby, an outspoken young housemaid, presents Mary with a skipping rope: Yorkshire good sense triumphing over Mary’s imperial malaise.

Also in the manor is Colin, her 10-year-old cousin. Hidden from Mary, she discovers him after hearing his cries at night.

Colin is unable to walk and believes he will not live to reach adulthood. Sequestered in his bedroom, Colin terrorises his servants with his tantrums: he performs “hysterics” in the model of Gothic femininity.




Read more:
The Yellow Wallpaper: a 19th-century short story of nervous exhaustion and the perils of women’s ‘rest cures’


Transformation

Perhaps the most famous image associated with Burnett’s text is the locked door leading to the eponymous garden.

The first edition of The Secret Garden, published in 1911.
Houghton Library, Harvard University

This walled garden had formerly belonged to Colin’s mother, Lilias Craven. When she died after an accident in the garden, her husband, Archibald, locked the door and buried the key.

After Mary unearths the key, she begins to work in this mysterious, overgrown garden along with Martha’s brother, Dickon. Eventually, she manages to draw Colin out of his room with the help of Dickon, and the garden helps him to recover his strength.

Burnett draws upon the cultural connection

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On Teaching: The Healing Power of Garden Class

Broady works to fill what he calls “the nature deficit.” For eight years at Ashe Charter, he worked as a garden teacher introducing students to the worlds outside their door. In July, he started as an agriculture and careers teacher at Living School, a high school in its second year that follows a “learning by doing” philosophy; students focus on multidisciplinary projects, and the goal is to graduate with both a college acceptance letter and a trade certification. But even in a slightly different role, Broady has the same mission as always: bringing health, healing, and connection to students, particularly children of color.

Broady’s own childhood, in Florissant, Missouri, had nature in droves. His father, a former science teacher, kept a huge garden. Broady took himself on adventures in the woods across the street. “It was a dream,” he said. “I was able to just explore in nature, and I knew that nature was my own.” He majored in biology and began teaching high school in New York City in 1999. That was the first and last time he held a traditional classroom job. From 2000 to 2009, he taught in community-education programs and alternative schools, designed curricula, worked as a chef, and made electronic music. Eventually, he settled in San Francisco.

Over that same period, programs that introduced public-school kids to gardening were putting down roots in New Orleans. In 1998, volunteers started an after-school gardening program at the city’s first charter school, New Orleans Charter Middle. NOCM’s organizers, now a charter-management group called FirstLine Schools, had just taken over Samuel J. Green Middle School in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina destroyed the NOCM campus and temporarily closed Green. In 2006, the famed Berkeley chef Alice Waters invited Green to become the first spot to replicate her original Edible Schoolyard, a public-school garden program that introduced children to sustainable agriculture and nutritious eating through hands-on activities. An edible schoolyard is different from a regular school garden because of its “seed to table” philosophy: Community members grow food, then cook and eat it, together.

When Broady heard about Edible Schoolyard NOLA in 2010, he got so excited that he applied for the only open job—a policy-administration position, not his forte. Then he had one conversation with the director, bought a Volvo, and drove from San Francisco sight unseen. Fortunately, Green had just lost a garden worker, so Broady got a job. And, as it turned out, he was instrumental in expanding the program; during his time, FirstLine took on four additional elementary-middle schools. He started teaching in the largest garden, at Ashe.

Today, Ashe has a cornucopia of annual Edible rituals. In October, they hold Sweet Potato Fest, with a parade and a community spud harvest. November is fifth-grade “Iron Chef.” For the annual report-card night, when parents come to the school to see their children’s progress, Broady displays objects like bird skulls found in the garden, and an array of student-concocted herbal tinctures, teas, and salves. Every September brings Watermelon

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