White House Halloween to be ‘modified’ to meet CDC guidelines: report

The White House’s Halloween celebration will take place despite the coronavirus pandemic, albeit in “modified” form, CNN reported Tuesday.

Plans for the event are “full-steam ahead,” a source familiar with the White House’s planning told the network.

The specific modifications will include face masks and other mitigation measures, but the source did not offer further details. The annual event typically features the president and first lady handing out candy to local children on the White House South Lawn.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell ‘can’t get it done’ on COVID-19 relief MORE and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpEric Trump falsely calls president’s coronavirus treatment a vaccine Trump rallies supporters at White House in first event since COVID-19 diagnosis Christie released from the hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis MORE were diagnosed with COVID-19 earlier this month, with the president requiring a weekend in the hospital.

White House physician Sean Conley has said the president has tested negative and is no longer contagious. Trump has since returned to the campaign trail and resumed large rallies and events, holding a White House campaign event Saturday and a Florida campaign rally Monday.

Several other infections have been linked to a White House Rose Garden event last month nominating Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, including those of Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisDemocrats warn of ObamaCare threat from Barrett, Trump Gloves come off in Barrett confirmation hearing GOP senator attends Barrett hearings in person after COVID-19 diagnosis MORE (R-N.C.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator attends Barrett hearings in person after COVID-19 diagnosis GOP Rep. Mike Bost tests positive for COVID-19 Harrison calls on Graham to take a COVID-19 test before debate MORE (R-Wis.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe Hill’s 12:30 Report – Sponsored by Facebook – Sights and sounds as Amy Coney’s Barrett hearing begins Gloves come off in Barrett confirmation hearing GOP senator attends Barrett hearings in person after COVID-19 diagnosis MORE (R-Utah), as well as former counselor to the president Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayTrump Jr. returning to campaign trail after quarantining Christie released from the hospital after COVID-19 diagnosis The Memo: Trump searches for path to comeback MORE.

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.

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As White House approves vaccine guidelines, Trump sees conspiracy

It was two weeks ago today when Donald Trump first raised the prospect of rejecting strict FDA guidelines on possible coronavirus vaccines. “That has to be approved by the White House,” the president said. “We may or may not approve it.”

Around the same time, the Republican suggested FDA officials were conspiring against him, “delaying” the vaccine as part of a pre-election “political hit” against him.

It was against this backdrop that the public learned this week that White House officials were, in fact, blocking the tougher federal vaccine guidelines. That is, until yesterday, when the White House relented and released the stricter standards.

The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that manufacturers of Covid-19 vaccines will need to follow tens of thousands of study participants for at least two months to look for any possible safety issues before the agency would consider authorization…. The FDA will require two months of follow-up for at least half of the study participants after they receive their last doses of vaccine. The vaccine candidates furthest ahead in phase 3 clinical trials, from Moderna and Pfizer, each require two doses, given about one month apart.

This will, among other things, make it impossible for a vaccine to be available before Election Day, which had been a presidential priority.

With this in mind, Trump returned to Twitter last night, writing, “New FDA Rules make it more difficult for them to speed up vaccines for approval before Election Day. Just another political hit job!”

Just so we’re all clear, Trump believes FDA officials are only pretending to care about vaccine safety, and the agency has actually issued strict guidelines as part of a political scheme. The president also apparently believes that his own White House is part of the “hit job,” since it was White House officials who yesterday cleared the new standards for public release.

I can’t say whether Trump’s medications are affecting his judgment or not, but I can say it’s weird to see a sitting president denounce a public-health decision made by his own team.

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Trump claimed, without justification, that new tighter FDA vaccine guidelines were a ‘political hit job,’ hours after the White House approved them



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images


© Win McNamee/Getty Images
President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images

  • Trump claimed the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) tougher guidelines for COVID-19 vaccine developers are a “political hit job” on him.
  • The White House approved the new regulations on Tuesday.
  • The FDA says that before vaccine makers submit an emergency-approval application they should follow trial participants for at least two months after a final dose.
  • These stricter guidelines will most likely prevent any vaccine being approved before the presidential election on November 3 — a deadline Trump had hoped vaccine makers could hit.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has accused the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of launching a “political hit job” on him, hours after the White House accepted the regulator’s stricter guidelines for coronavirus vaccine developers.

Trump has consistently said he hopes to have a vaccine ready before election day, but the new FDA guidelines will make it difficult for any COVID-19 vaccine to be approved before the November 3 vote. 

He lashed out at the FDA in a tweet on Tuesday evening, tagging commissioner Stephen Hahn.

He did not offer any evidence for his claim the new guidelines were motivated by politics.

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The tougher guidelines were cleared by the Office of Management and Budget on Tuesday after a two-week hold-up, during which they were reportedly blocked by senior White House officials, including Mark Meadows, chief of staff.

In the guidelines, the FDA said that before vaccine makers submit an emergency-approval application they should monitor trial participants for a minimum of two months after their final dose in phase-three clinical trials. The agency also expects vaccine developers to document five cases of severe infection in volunteers who took the placebo instead of the vaccine.

Four vaccines have entered the final stage of testing in the US, including one from Pfizer and one from Moderna. The two companies kicked off their trials in July.

Volunteers usually receive their second dose less than a month after their first, but two months of monitoring make it unlikely that either company will have have enough data before November.

Moderna’s CEO said on September 30 that the firm wouldn’t be able to submit an application for emergency approval until late November at the earliest, as it wouldn’t have enough safety data, per the Financial Times.

Coronavirus has claimed more than 210,000 lives in the US so far, and infected more than 7.5 million people.

Among those that have been infected is Trump himself: He tweeted on October 2 that he and Melania Trump had tested positive for the virus. After being flown to Walter Reed Medical Center, he received two experimental treatments to fight the infection. He has since returned to the White House, where staff are reportedly anxious about catching COVID-19 from him, per multiple

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Despite the White House’s COVID-19 Outbreak, the Trump Campaign Continues to Ignore Public Health Guidelines

It’s safe to say that if most political campaigns had seen its candidate, campaign manager, and more than a dozen associates test positive for COVID-19 within days of each other, they would likely reassess the strategy of holding large, in-person events that could be potential breeding grounds for the highly-infectious and deadly disease.



a person looking at the camera: A car with U.S. President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.


© Alex Edelman—AFP/Getty Images
A car with U.S. President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.

Not so with the Trump campaign.

While briefly pausing in-person events after President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump disclosed their positive diagnoses on Oct. 2, the campaign announced, just a day later, that “Operation MAGA”—a series of in-person events that the campaign touted as a way to “energize and mobilize the MAGA universe to maintain full speed until the President returns to the campaign trail”—will commence later this week. Trump himself tweeted on Oct. 5, the same day he was discharged from the hospital, that he “will be back on the Campaign Trail soon.”

The Trump campaign’s schedule is already jam-packed. On Oct. 8, Vice President Mike Pence will hold a rally at a tactical gear manufacturing company in Peoria, Ariz. On that same day Donald Trump Jr. is scheduled to hold an event at a Holiday Inn in Panama City, Fla., Lara Trump will join Trump campaign advisers Mercedes Schlapp and Katrina Pierson for a “women for Trump bus tour event in New Castle, Pennsylvania, and Eric Trump will host two events in North Carolina.

“I expect us to have upwards of fifty folks all around the country,” said Jason Miller, a senior adviser to the Trump campaign, on NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday, “flooding the zone in the battleground states later this week.”

Republican strategists say that one main reason the Trump campaign struggled to pivot after the President’s diagnosis is because its strategy, unlike many other Presidential campaigns in the past, is almost entirely dependent on the man on the top of the ticket. Instead of switching the focus to messaging about specific policy promises or other moves a second-term Trump Administration might embrace, they’re hamstrung by their dependence on Trump’s personal draw as a candidate.

“This campaign relies on the candidate to carry [it] more than most campaigns do,” says Alex Conant, a Republican strategist who worked on Florida Senator Marco Rubio’s 016 presidential run. “It’s clearly not helpful to not have the candidate traveling the country in the final weeks of the election.”

But the Trump campaign’s decision to stick to the current strategy carries its own risks. Trump is trailing Biden in the polls by double digits, and a CNN poll released on Oct. 5 found that two thirds of Americans thought he handled the risk of coronavirus irresponsibly. It’s unlikely that continuing to hold in-person events will improve the President’s standing on this latter point.

Pence and Trump Jr.’s in-person rallies this week pose a particular issue. If these

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Dallas-area Pastor Jack Graham opts not to follow CDC guidelines in wake of Rose Garden COVID exposure

Updated Oct. 5 at 8:15 p.m. to include additional information.

WASHINGTON — Dallas-area megachurch Pastor Jack Graham has declined to follow medical guidelines despite being in close contact with people who have since tested positive for the coronavirus after a Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony, telling his congregation, “I am ridiculously healthy.”

The 70-year-old leader of Prestonwood Baptist Church attended the ceremony at the White House where President Donald Trump formally announced his nomination of conservative Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court. Since the event, at least 10 attendees have tested positive for the coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, including former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was photographed sitting directly behind Graham. Pastor Greg Laurie of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverside, Calif., was sitting next to Graham and also later tested positive.

Graham, Laurie and Christie were among the vast majority of people not wearing a mask at the event.

Robert Morris, the senior pastor at Gateway Church in Southlake, was photographed at the Rose Garden ceremony without a mask. He was seated directly behind Notre Dame President John Jenkins, who was also unmasked and later tested positive for the virus.

A spokesperson for the church declined to comment on if Morris had been tested for the virus and was quarantining following his exposure.

A maskless Graham led his church’s service on Sunday and was photographed having a conversation with several worshippers afterward by a member of his congregation. Graham was not wearing a mask in the photo that was shared with The Dallas Morning News.

Doctors look at a lung CT image at a hospital in Xiaogan,China.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends anyone exposed to someone who tests positive for the virus quarantine for at least 14 days following the exposure and maintain six feet of social distance from others.

“I am ridiculously healthy, let’s just put it that way,” Graham said during the service. “I’m not sick, I’m fine. … I don’t have COVID, let’s just put it that way, and I’m grateful for that.”

The CDC says symptoms of COVID-19 may appear two to 14 days after an exposure to someone infected with the virus, hence the quarantine recommendation. The Rose Garden event is still well-within that 14 day period.

A quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been infected with COVID-19 away from others to help “prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with the virus without feeling symptoms,” according to the CDC.

People exposed to the virus can test negative before later testing positive.

Christie said he had tested negative last Tuesday ahead of the presidential debate but then tested positive on Friday. Christie was hospitalized Sunday as a precaution, he tweeted.

Graham addressed the concerns in a statement Monday but ignored questions about when his most recent test for the virus was and if he intends to quarantine for the remainder of the 14 day period since his exposure.

“As I mentioned during our weekend services, thankfully,

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Trillium beer garden reopens on The Greenway, with a few new guidelines

It may be fall, but the chance to have a beer outdoors on the Greenway isn’t over yet.

The Trillium Brewing Company beer garden has set up shop on the Rose Kennedy Greenway for the fourth year in a row, starting Friday at noon. Under pandemic-era guidelines, Trillium Garden on The Greenway will require advance online reservations, contactless ordering, and strict social distancing protocols. Customers must also purchase food from nearby trucks — like Zaaki, Pennypacker, and Bon Me — alongside their drink order in accordance with state guidelines.

“Since we first opened the Trillium Garden, my summer in Boston isn’t complete without beers under the sun in our special home on The Greenway,” Trillium Brewing co-founder Esther Tetreault said in a statement. “While opening later than we would have liked, watching the seasons change in the heart of our city will be a great way to extend the summer outdoors and transition into a classic New England autumn.”

The garden now brews a small batch of beers onsite at the intersection of High Street and Atlantic Avenue. This will include special season releases for the Greenway location.

“Brewing and creative inspiration is at the heart of everything we do,” Tetreault said. “Collaborating with our friends at the Greenway Conservancy, in concert with state and local agencies, has allowed us to bring the beer garden concept to the next level, providing our guests a special, sustainable experience.”

Trillium Garden will be open from noon to 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays, weather permitting. Reservations for parties up to six people can be made up to seven days in advance through www.resy.com.

City Winery on the Greenway, at Dewey Square, closes for the season on Sunday.

The Trillium Brewing Company locations in Fenway and Fort Point are open during normal hours. City Winery on the Greenway, at Dewey Square, closes for the season on Sunday.

Diti Kohli can be reached at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter at @ditikohli_.

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Trump claims White House can overrule FDA’s attempt to toughen guidelines for coronavirus vaccine

President Donald Trump claimed Wednesday that the White House could override the US Food and Drug Administration if the agency released tougher standards for the authorization of a Covid-19 vaccine, casting such a move as “political.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie


© MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images


His comments come as the FDA considers new Covid-19 vaccine guidelines that would likely push an authorization beyond Election Day, according to three sources familiar with the situation. That timeline would dash Trump’s hopes of a pre-election authorization, having repeatedly said the vaccine could be ready by November 3.

“We’re looking at that and that has to be approved by the White House. We may or may not approve it,” the President said of the new FDA guidelines at a White House news conference. “That sounds like a political move.”

The FDA “respectfully” declined to comment on Trump’s claims. But generally speaking, agency guidelines do go through the White House Office of Management and Budget review process, an FDA official told CNN Wednesday.

In the meantime, the President’s comments are sure to fuel new unease in a vaccine process that was already being greeted with skepticism by many Americans in polls. A lack of trust in the program is a nightmare scenario, public health experts say, since a vaccine is the best hope of eventually ending the pandemic and restoring normal life.

Earlier Wednesday, the commissioner of the FDA, Dr. Stephen Hahn, made a commitment to America that the “FDA will not authorize or approve a vaccine that we would not feel comfortable giving to our families.”

“FDA will not authorize or approve any Covid-19 vaccine before it has met the agency’s rigorous expectations for safety and effectiveness. Decisions to authorize or approve any such vaccine or therapeutic will be made by the dedicated career staff at FDA, through our thorough review processes, and science will guide our decisions,” Hahn specifically promised the Senate Health Committee.

“FDA will not permit any pressure from anyone to change that,” he added.

National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on “The Situation Room” that he trusts the FDA to apply the highest safety and efficacy standards to all the coronavirus vaccines, though he conceded that he wasn’t sure if the FDA or White House had the final say on vaccine approval.

“I am not a lawyer or a constitutional scholar,” he said. “I actually don’t know the answer to that.”

Two former FDA commissioners previously told CNN that while they think it’s very unlikely that Trump could pressure scientists into authorizing or approving a Covid-19 vaccine, it’s possible. The Department of Health and Human Services has in the past overruled the FDA’s recommendations on medications.

Despite reassurances from federal officials, there are fears that the typical pathway for review and approval of the Covid-19 vaccine will be eschewed, or at least bent, because of political pressure.

“What I’m concerned about is there could be a gray zone where a vaccine looks partially protective and it

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Walla Painting is Adhering to Strict CDC Guidelines as Their Busy Interior Painting Season Gets Underway – Press Release

Interior Painting

Walla Painting would like to let both home and business owners know that they are still providing interior painting services and these can be done safely. They say that because of that, there is no good reason for people to postpone this painting task if they feel that painting the inside of their home or business is needed. The company assures its customers that they are diligently following CDC guidelines and taking all necessary precautions during these challenging times. Interior house painting will give any home or business a fresh new look. They also offer a wide variety of low VOC interior paint color choices; some of which are even thought to enhance people’s moods. Walla Painting provides its reputable interior painting services to residential and business customers in and around the Carmel, Indiana area.

Jonathan Walla, the company owner, says, “We find that many people assume we are not doing interior painting projects at this time because of the threat of the spread of Covid-19. Rest assured that is not the case. Although we do have to distance ourselves from our customers more than we would like and take other precautions, we are still doing all sorts of commercial and residential interior painting jobs. As the weather in the Carmel area starts to slowly go downhill as winter fast approaches, it’s the perfect time for you to call us and schedule the interior painting work that you need done.”

The company owner continued by talking more about the safety pre-cautions they are undertaking at this time when working on their interior painting projects. He says that his employees are doing such things as frequently washing their hands for twenty seconds at a time throughout the day and applying hand sanitizer after that has been done. They are also using sanitizing wipes on their equipment regularly and they will even use gloves and shoe covers if a customer requests it. Walla says that most important of all, they are urging employees to stay home if they are feeling ill. He says that their interior painting customers can also do their part by rescheduling the work if anyone in their household is experiencing flu-like symptoms and by taking advantage of such things as virtual consultations and doing bill paying by credit card over the phone.

According to Walla, those at the company are also excited about the wide array of interior color choices they are now offering. He says that among the most popular interior colors they are using now is grey and it has replaced beige as the dominant interior base color. He says that their customers are also selecting blue paints if they want a room to feel more peaceful and serene, yellow if they want a room to feel warm and cheery, and are even using orange in workout and activity areas because it supposedly helps people feel energetic and enthusiastic.

Walla Painting’s services are also very highly regarded by those that have used them. J.G. states, “This

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