How to Clean Grout | Cleaning Grout Stains

Even the best tile-cleaning routine in your shower can leave the grout begging for extra attention. Mildew and mold are commonly seen between shower tiles, breeding quickly in the perpetually wet and humid atmosphere. If you have light shower grout, you’ll see it – first spots, then bigger areas – and hopefully you can clean it before it gets out of control.

If you have dark grout, it can be much more easily disguised and become a bigger health concern. Make it a point to include grout cleaning as part of your ordinary shower routine and abate mold buildup on the grout easily before it becomes a big chore.

One of the best ways to clean shower grout doesn’t involve the use of harsh cleansers or chlorine bleach-based products. Harsh chemicals can be challenging to use in an enclosed bathroom environment where ventilation and air circulation are compromised. Oxygen-based bleach (hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate or sodium perborate) and washing soda are safer alternatives to consider when you’re looking for a powerful indoor cleaning solution. They’re notably more eco-friendly and treat and prevent the growth of mold in a really effective way.

Next time you’re deep cleaning your bathroom tiles, pull this recipe from your memory bank:

Start by creating a paste-like mixture using one part hydrogen peroxide and two parts of an oxygenated powder product, such as OxiClean or generic washing soda. The thick combination of these powerful ingredients will adhere to the grout lines in your shower without dripping away and spot-treat areas affected by mildew and mold. It’s not too harsh to use as a defense against spores, either, so even if the grout doesn’t look dirty, consider applying it as an effective cleanser that will aid in preventing mold from blossoming. If you look at ingredients in many of the heavy-duty mold abatement products, you’ll spot that hydrogen peroxide is a common ingredient, so it’s no surprise that this at-home solution works really, really well.

With the paste in a bowl, use an old toothbrush to apply it to the grout lines between the tiles in your shower.

Focus on the areas you can visibly see the mold but also aim to coat areas of the shower that may be more mold-prone and mold-affected than others. This might include any grout along shelves, corners and floor tiles, or the grout and tile that surrounds the shower drain. Allow the paste to set for a few minutes to work its magic and then give the grout lines one more agitating scrub for good measure. Next, rinse the area thoroughly and use a cloth to wipe the surfaces clean.

While you’re busy focused on the shower grout, consider the best ways to clean build-up from the surface of the shower tiles, too.

A simple white vinegar wash is a good solution for non-porous tile surfaces, while marble or other porous stone surfaces are more safely cleaned using plain water or cleaning products specifically formulated for stone to avoid

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Mum’s grout cleaning trick leaves her bathroom walls sparkling clean



a sign on a tiled floor: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

An Australian mother has revealed how she ‘cracked the code’ and discovered how to clean dirty grout on bathroom shower walls with ease.

The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried ‘every product’ on her rental bathroom walls with no success and decided to mix bicarb soda with Domestos disinfectant bleach.

‘Mums! I’ve cracked the code! This took me only a few minutes and not a lot of effort – I couldn’t believe my eyes,’ she wrote alongside photos of the transformation posted in the Mums Who Cook, Clean and Organise Facebook group.  

For health and safety reasons, it’s advised to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals, but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe.



a close up of a tiled wall: BEFORE: An Australian mother has revealed how she 'cracked the code' and discovered how to clean dirty grout on the bathroom shower walls with ease (pictured)


© Provided by Daily Mail
BEFORE: An Australian mother has revealed how she ‘cracked the code’ and discovered how to clean dirty grout on the bathroom shower walls with ease (pictured)



a group of people sitting on a tiled floor: AFTER: The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried 'every product' but resorted to mixing bicarb soda with Domestos bleach. She said she was 'so pleased' with the result (pictured)


© Provided by Daily Mail
AFTER: The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried ‘every product’ but resorted to mixing bicarb soda with Domestos bleach. She said she was ‘so pleased’ with the result (pictured)

The woman said she mixed the two products until a paste was formed, then used an old toothbrush to apply it onto the grout.

‘In most places I didn’t even leave it, just a light brushing, it was gone in an instant,’ she said.

The woman was ‘so pleased’ with how well the formula worked at cleaning the grout she highly recommends it to others.

Her post has been ‘liked’ by more than 1,200 others since it was shared on September 20, leaving others very impressed.



a close up of a device: Bicarb soda is commonly used to clean products and areas around the home


© Provided by Daily Mail
Bicarb soda is commonly used to clean products and areas around the home



a close up of a bottle: For health and safety reasons, it's best to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe to use


© Provided by Daily Mail
For health and safety reasons, it’s best to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe to use

‘I’m off to go scrub everything in the house!’ one woman said.

‘Well I know what I’m doing while the kids are at school,’ another said.

‘Just bought Domestos! Will give it a go,’ a third added. 

While the clever hack worked well at cleaning the grout, others warned about the dangers of mixing chemicals together. 

CHEMICALS YOU SHOULD NEVER MIX 

Bleach + Vinegar

Baking Soda + Vinegar

Bleach + Ammonia

Drain Cleaner + Drain Cleaner

Hydrogen Peroxide + Vinegar

Bleach + Rubbing Alcohol 

Source: Good House Keeping 

‘Be careful people when mixing chemicals, don’t ever mix vinegar and bleach,’ one mum said. 

‘Good on you for experimenting and finding a solution to something that so many people struggle with – please carefully research your chemicals before mixing!’ another warned.   

Inhaling the toxic vapours can lead to coughing, breathing problems, allergic reactions and even nasty chemical burns. 

It’s a common cleaning mistake many people make, as cleaning experts have warned for years that adding any acidic to bleach will produce a toxic chlorine vapour. 

Before you get

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Mum’s genius grout cleaning trick leaves her bathroom walls sparkling clean in seconds

‘I couldn’t believe my eyes’: Mum’s ‘genius’ and VERY simple grout cleaning trick leaves her rental bathroom walls sparkling in minutes

  • A mum has shared how she ‘cracked the code’ on how to clean shower grout  
  • Posting online, she resorted to using bicarb soda mixed with Domestos bleach
  • She said the mixture worked remarkably well and required minimal scrubbing 
  • For health and safety, it’s best to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals

An Australian mother has revealed how she ‘cracked the code’ and discovered how to clean dirty grout on bathroom shower walls with ease.

The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried ‘every product’ on her rental bathroom walls with no success and decided to mix bicarb soda with Domestos disinfectant bleach.

‘Mums! I’ve cracked the code! This took me only a few minutes and not a lot of effort – I couldn’t believe my eyes,’ she wrote alongside photos of the transformation posted in the Mums Who Cook, Clean and Organise Facebook group.  

For health and safety reasons, it’s advised to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals, but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe.

BEFORE: An Australian mother has revealed how she 'cracked the code' and discovered how to clean dirty grout on the bathroom shower walls with ease (pictured)

BEFORE: An Australian mother has revealed how she ‘cracked the code’ and discovered how to clean dirty grout on the bathroom shower walls with ease (pictured)

AFTER: The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried 'every product' but resorted to mixing bicarb soda with Domestos bleach. She said she was 'so pleased' with the result (pictured)

AFTER: The Melbourne woman was frustrated after having tried ‘every product’ but resorted to mixing bicarb soda with Domestos bleach. She said she was ‘so pleased’ with the result (pictured)

The woman said she mixed the two products until a paste was formed, then used an old toothbrush to apply it onto the grout.

‘In most places I didn’t even leave it, just a light brushing, it was gone in an instant,’ she said.

The woman was ‘so pleased’ with how well the formula worked at cleaning the grout she highly recommends it to others.

Her post has been ‘liked’ by more than 1,200 others since it was shared on September 20, leaving others very impressed.

Bicarb soda is commonly used to clean products and areas around the home

For health and safety reasons, it's best to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe to use

For health and safety reasons, it’s commonly known to avoid mixing bleach with other chemicals, but combining the product with bicarb soda is safe to use

‘I’m off to go scrub everything in the house!’ one woman said.

‘Well I know what I’m doing while the kids are at school,’ another said.

‘Just bought Domestos! Will give it a go,’ a third added. 

While the clever hack worked well at cleaning the grout, others warned about the dangers of mixing chemicals together. 

CHEMICALS YOU SHOULD NEVER MIX 

Bleach + Vinegar

Baking Soda + Vinegar

Bleach + Ammonia

Drain Cleaner + Drain Cleaner

Hydrogen Peroxide + Vinegar

Bleach + Rubbing Alcohol 

Source: Good House Keeping 

‘Be careful people when mixing chemicals, don’t ever mix vinegar and bleach,’ one mum said. 

‘Good on you for experimenting and finding a solution to something that so many people struggle with – please carefully research

Read more

Grout, Mirror, Lighting, Tile, Flooring, Faucet

When you watch remodeling shows on TV, you can get the impression that anything’s possible. A shower big enough for a farm animal, an increase in home value that’s higher than some lottery payouts, a window-​facing jacuzzi tub with “Best House on the Block” printed on the side in diamonds. All of that is potentially achievable—and probably the reason you want to renovate your bathroom—but you should be aware that a gut renovation is a big, ugly job. The bathroom may take up the smallest footprint, but it’s the most complex room in your home, served by vents, water lines, waste lines, and electricity lines—most of which will try to kill you if you don’t know what you’re doing. (The vents are probably safe.)

If you want to tackle a bathroom reno, you’ve got two options. OK, three, if you’re a professional plumber, or a home flipper with a television show: Put a dumpster on the lawn and have at it. Otherwise, you can buy your new bathroom by hiring a contractor. Or, you can dramatically improve the appearance and function of your bathroom by cleaning, repainting, or focusing on key projects that require only basic plumbing and electrical skills. Here’s how.



tile

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1. Regrout and Recaulk

DIFFICULTY: ●○○○○

Tools and Materials

  • Grout saw
  • Carbide-tip scoring tool
  • Grout Grout float
  • Grout and tile sealer
  • Plastic brush
  • Sponge
  • Tub and tile caulk
  • Caulk gun
  • Utility knife

    If the grout in your bathroom is discolored but sound, you don’t need to replace it. It just needs a thorough cleaning with a pro-grade tile and grout cleaner, such as the Aqua Mix line by Custom Building Products. If it’s truly foul, the nuclear option would be to scrub dingy tile and grout with a white Scotch-Brite pad, and a mixture of two products from Custom Building Products: Aqua Mix NanoScrub and Aqua Mix Heavy-Duty Tile & Grout Cleaner. If this won’t clean it, nothing will. After cleaning, seal with Aqua Mix Grout Sealer.

    grouting

    (1) If grout is flaking out of the joints, rake them out with a carbide-grit grout saw or a carbide scraper. For a narrow joint, less than 1/8 inch, you can also use a carbide-tip scoring tool, a type of knife normally used to score cement board. In either case, sweep dust out of the joints with a clean plastic brush, then wipe the surface with a damp sponge or clean cloth and let dry. (2) Apply fresh grout over the whole area, moving your float over the joints at a 45-degree angle. Wipe off up any excess. (3) When the grout has dried, use a tile sponge and water to wipe any grout haze off the tile. When all is clean and dry, reseal the entire surface.

    bathroom
    bathroom
    bathroom

    To replace a caulked joint, use a

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    Grout Alternative for Bathroom Tile

    When one is tiling their bathroom floor, experts will always tell consumers to fill the spaces between the tiles with grout so that the seal is secure and does not allow moisture to seep into the floor. If moisture seeps in-between the tile, it opens up the opportunity for mold to form underneath the floor. Putting something between the tiles to create a seal is important, however, there are alternatives to using grout. It is only a matter of deciding what works best for the consumer, taking expenses, aesthetics, and efficiency into account. All of these options can be done by taking a “do-it-yourself” approach rather than hiring professionals if the consumer wishes.

    The first alternative is sanded grout. It is cement-based and is most commonly used for in-between tile and stone. Purchasing a package of sanded grout from Ace Hardware Outlet for $6 per 7-pound package. It is a commonly absorbent product and should be sealed over to protect the product from stains and dirt. It is very simple to apply and a great choice for those who are unfamiliar with the process. Since the price is so affordable, it makes it a lot easier to afford the correct amount and fix mistakes.

    Another alternative is an epoxy-based one. The advantage to using this type is that it is both stain and mildew resistant. While this can be self-applied, it is fairly difficult since there are several components to the mixture that need to be combined and mixed just before application. After mixing, there is only a small window of time that one has to apply the epoxy-based grout to the area. If this is one’s first time applying this type, it is suggested to hire a seasoned contractor to get the job done. However, if one is interested in taking on the project, this type can be found at The Home Depot for $31 per package.

    These options are both great alternatives to using standard grout materials. Both options are affordable and will keep any bathroom safe from stains, mold, dirt, and mildew that could possibly collect on the floor. Consumers looking to upgrade their bathroom should look into alternatives to grout to save themselves both money and time during their updates. These alternatives will give consumers the same benefits of traditional grout without having to spend the time outlining each individual tile themselves. Once finished, the consumer will be pleasantly surprised with their results!…

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