What is the government home improvement scheme and how does it work?

1 October 2020, 13:42

The home improvements scheme is open for applications
The home improvements scheme is open for applications.

Picture:
Getty Images


What is the government’s green voucher scheme 2020 and how can I apply? Find out everything…

The Green Homes Grant scheme is now open for homeowners in England to make energy-efficient improvements to their houses.

Outlined back in July, the voucher plan sees the government pay two-thirds of the cost of any green updates to the value of £5,000 per household.

This can include insulation, double glazing and heat pumps, but doesn’t cover gas boilers.

So, here’s everything you need to know about the green home improvement scheme…

Rishi Sunak announced the Green Homes Grant
Rishi Sunak announced the Green Homes Grant.

Picture:
PA Images


What is the Green Homes Grant?

The Green Homes Grant scheme will provide £2bn for home improvement projects as part of a wider £3bn government plan to cut carbon emissions.

This will see vouchers handed out to homeowners which can be used towards making specific energy-efficient improvements to homes.

You need to install at least one primary improvement to be eligible for the Green Homes Grant which include:

– Insulation, including solid wall, cavity wall, underfloor, loft or roof insulation

– Low-carbon heating, such as air-source or ground-source heat pumps, or solar thermal systems, which provide renewable ways of heating your home

You can then get up to the same amount for secondary improvements which include:

– Draught-proofing

– Double or triple glazing, or secondary glazing

– Energy efficient doors, where you’re replacing single-glazed or solid doors installed before 2002

– Heating controls and insulation

Gas boilers are not covered by the scheme.

You can only receive funding for secondary improvements up to the amount of funding you get for the primary measures.

So if you receive £2,000 towards cavity wall insulation, you can only receive a maximum of £2,000 towards any secondary measures.

How can I apply for the Green Homes Grant?

It’s thought that 650,000 homes in England will be covered by the grant with both homeowners and landlords eligible.

Households in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland cannot apply for the scheme.

Firstly, you need to use the Simple Energy Advice (SEA) service to see if you’re eligible and check which energy efficiency improvements can be made to your home.

You’ll then need to find TrustMark and/or Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) registered tradesperson to get the work done. It’s recommended you find at least three quotes before going ahead.

You can then apply online using the government website to obtain a voucher.

To complete step three, you’ll need:

– the name and date of birth of the property owner or owners

– the name and date of birth of anyone living in the property who is receiving benefits

– a quote for the work from a TrustMark-registered tradesperson

– the TrustMark licence number of your chosen tradesperson

Once the work is complete, you’ll need a dated copy of the invoice provided by the installer to redeem the voucher.

The grant will be paid directly to

Read more

House Speaker Michael Madigan says it’s not ‘ethically improper’ to find government jobs for people. Here’s what he’s failing to mention.

For years, Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan has defended his aggressive push to land political allies and their friends and family on taxpayer-funded payrolls, but rarely has he waxed as philosophically about it as he did last week in a three-page letter.



Michael Madigan wearing a suit and tie: Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District talks with House Republican Leader Jim Durkin (R) 82nd District before a debate at Illinois House to vote on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District talks with House Republican Leader Jim Durkin (R) 82nd District before a debate at Illinois House to vote on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.



Michael Madigan standing in front of a door: Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District watches as Illinois House votes on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Speaker of the House Michael J. Madigan (D) 22nd District watches as Illinois House votes on a bill raising statewide minimum wage during session at the State Capitol in Springfield on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019.

Facing intense pressure from a federal investigation into ComEd’s bribes-for-favors scandal and an invitation from a House corruption committee to tell the public what he knows, Madigan’s missive broke two months of near silence. The powerful speaker loudly proclaimed his innocence and tried to reframe his penchant for patronage hiring as a virtue.

Not only is “helping people find jobs not a crime,” Madigan wrote, it’s not even “ethically improper” for politicians to make job recommendations.

“To the contrary, I believe that it is part of my duties as a community and political leader to help good people find work — from potential executives to college interns, and more,” wrote the 78-year-old Illinois Democratic Party chairman, alluding to some of the very jobs that prosecutors brought up in charging ComEd with crimes. “What an employer chooses to do with that recommendation rests solely with their discretion.”

What Madigan didn’t mention when discussing the numerous jobs he’s secured for people during more than 50 years in politics is how that practice has benefited him and what it’s cost taxpayers and electricity ratepayers.

The Tribune has spent the last decade chronicling how it works: Patronage jobs are the lifeblood of Madigan’s political organization. And the people Madigan recommends be hired often serve as foot soldiers on the campaigns for the very legislative seats that allow the speaker to stay in power. In turn, that control of the House is key to helping Madigan bring in clients at his law firm, which handles high-dollar property tax appeals on some of Chicago’s biggest buildings.

Starting in 2010, the Tribune published the “The Madigan Rules,” a first-of-its-kind, yearslong investigation that exposed how the speaker built his political empire and law practice, revealing how those two careers repeatedly intersected. The report found that in some cases Madigan took public actions that benefited his private clients, though the speaker said his “personal code of conduct” ensured he maintained “high ethical standards.”



Michael Madigan sitting at a table using a laptop: House Speaker Michael Madigan listens to a debate on the House floor in 2019.


© Zbigniew Bzdak / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
House Speaker Michael Madigan listens to a debate on the House floor in 2019.

In 2013, the legislature’s watchdog investigated Madigan’s role in a Metra scandal after the commuter

Read more

Trump effort to bar racial-sensitivity trainings in federal government leads to confusion for employees

“I ended it because a lot of people were complaining that they were asked to do things that were absolutely insane, that it was a radical revolution that was taking place in our military, in our schools all over the place,” Trump said. “And you know it. And so does everybody.”

Democratic nominee Joe Biden alleged, however, that Trump had a much different motive for banning the trainings: “He’s a racist.”

Their comments came one day after the White House issued its second set of guidelines on the attempted bans. The guidelines outlined how the government would retaliate against those who did not follow the new restrictions.

They have raised numerous questions inside government agencies about how to proceed. It also triggered a backlash within the White House’s Office of Management and Budget, with some career employees complaining policy is being set based on what the president sees on conservative cable networks — and OMB officials are happily going along with it.

Russell Vought, OMB’s director, updated the administration’s guidance after the National Park Service sent agency officials a memo last week suspending hundreds of training programs while it tried to understand how to comply with the order, according to emails and documents reviewed by The Washington Post. It would later narrow the list of suspended courses, but some employees said they still included ones on sexual harassment, tribal consultation and how to respond to people with disabilities.

The White House orders have led to scrambling throughout the government.

Meanwhile, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the government’s second-largest agency and among the most decentralized, abruptly canceled a diversity training program at the VA hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla. This decision was made by the agency’s Washington headquarters after a conservative activist flagged the event on Twitter.

The chain of events stems from a Sept. 4 memo Vought issued, which said Trump had asked him to stop federal agencies from giving employee trainings on “white privilege” and critical race theory. Vought cast this approach as “divisive” and “un-American.”

The White House issued the memo after Fox News ran a number of segments criticizing “diversity and inclusion” efforts in the federal government.

Trump saw one of the cable news programs and asked aides, “What is this crap?” an administration official said, describing his reaction, and he directed OMB to cancel the seminars. Trump saw the matter as a winning campaign issue. Within days, a guest on Fox News who raised the issue had been called, Vought had been summoned to the Oval Office, and the memo from OMB had been drafted. It was released late on a Friday night.

Trump followed up with an executive order last week barring federal contractors from using workplace training that includes what he called “race or sex stereotyping or any form of race or sex scapegoating.” The president has also asked other aides what else can be done to make sure agencies are complying.

The White House directives attempt to create significant penalties for federal

Read more

Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions Awarded 5 Year Analytics Contract With the Department of the Interior

Press release content from Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

DALLAS – September 28, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions (Nexus Cognitive)  announced that it was awarded a 5-year Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract to evaluate 2-D seismic reflection field data for The Department of the Interior (DOI), Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), on behalf of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

“The Department of the Interior selected Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions to deliver state of the art Pre-Stack Time Migration and Pre-Stack Depth Migration analytics with deep learning that will help the agency achieve its mission to investigate the mineral potential of Alaska’s Offshore Continental Shelf (OCS), mainly for oil and gas potential, and to ensure that the federal government receives fair market value for OCS oil and gas leases that it awards to private firms through a competitive bidding process. We are honored to be the trusted partner with Department of Interior for the 5 year life of this award,” said Scott Marvel, Managing Partner, Nexus Government Solutions.

“This award from DOI further validates Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions deep skills in machine learning, and pervasive analytics powered by our capabilities in GPU enabled High Performance Compute. We look forward to accelerating the mission of DOI and BOEM,” said Anu Jain, Analytics Leader and Growth Officer of Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions.

About Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions 
Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions is a premier public sector digital transformation agency. Nexus has deep experience in delivering digital outcomes thru the use of Cloud, Advanced data and analytic capabilities, application migration, cognitive design services, cybersecurity, and deep SME expertise in our domains. Nexus strives to be the trusted partner to enable digital solutions to the public sector. Nexus Cognitive Government solutions is classified as a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB).

Learn more at  http://www.nexuscognitivegov.com  and  http://www.nexuscognitive.com

SOURCE Nexus Cognitive

For further information: Steve Roberts, Chief Operations Officer Nexus Government Solutions, 214.775.9949 ext. 703,  [email protected]

Press Release Service by Newswire.com

Original Source: Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions Awarded 5 Year Analytics Contract With the Department of the Interior

Source Article

Read more

Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions Awarded 5-Year Analytics Contract With the Department of the Interior

DALLAS, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions (Nexus Cognitive) announced that it was awarded a 5-year Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract to evaluate 2-D seismic reflection field data for The Department of the Interior (DOI), Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), on behalf of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

“The Department of the Interior selected Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions to deliver state of the art Pre-Stack Time Migration and Pre-Stack Depth Migration analytics with deep learning that will help the agency achieve its mission to investigate the mineral potential of Alaska’s Offshore Continental Shelf (OCS), mainly for oil and gas potential, and to ensure that the federal government receives fair market value for OCS oil and gas leases that it awards to private firms through a competitive bidding process. We are honored to be the trusted partner with Department of Interior for the 5 year life of this award,” said Scott Marvel, Managing Partner, Nexus Government Solutions.

“This award from DOI further validates Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions deep skills in machine learning, and pervasive analytics powered by our capabilities in GPU enabled High Performance Compute. We look forward to accelerating the mission of DOI and BOEM,” said Anu Jain, Analytics Leader and Growth Officer of Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions.

About Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions 
Nexus Cognitive Government Solutions is a premier public sector digital transformation agency. Nexus has deep experience in delivering digital outcomes thru the use of Cloud, Advanced data and analytic capabilities, application migration, cognitive design services, cybersecurity, and deep SME expertise in our domains. Nexus strives to be the trusted partner to enable digital solutions to the public sector. Nexus Cognitive Government solutions is classified as a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB).

Learn more at http://www.nexuscognitivegov.com and http://www.nexuscognitive.com

For further information: Steve Roberts, Chief Operations Officer Nexus Government Solutions, 214.775.9949 ext. 703, [email protected]

Related Files

nexus_Cognitive_color_logo.jpg

Cision
Cision

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nexus-cognitive-government-solutions-awarded-5-year-analytics-contract-with-the-department-of-the-interior-301138751.html

SOURCE Nexus Cognitive

Source Article

Read more

House may vote on bill to fund government through December

Washington — The House could vote on Tuesday on a short-term measure to keep government agencies funded through December 11, hoping to stave off a government shutdown days ahead of a September 30 funding deadline. The bill, known as a continuing resolution (CR), is expected to pass largely along party lines, as Republicans have complained about the lack of funding included to assist farmers.

“The Continuing Resolution introduced today will avert a catastrophic shutdown in the middle of the ongoing pandemic, wildfires and hurricanes, and keep government open until December 11, when we plan to have bipartisan legislation to fund the government for this fiscal year,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement announcing the measure on Monday.

However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell slammed the proposal, tweeting later on Monday that the measure “shamefully leaves out key relief and support that American farmers need.”

Republicans have argued for a provision that would allow the Trump administration to continue to dole out Department of Agriculture funds to bail out farms, which have been squeezed by the president’s trade policies. Democrats say that adding the funding for farms is a campaign ploy by Mr. Trump and Republicans to attract rural voters ahead of the election. Although the CR may see some opposition on the Senate floor, it is unclear whether McConnell would risk a government shutdown.

“We wouldn’t even think of threatening to shut down government,” Pelosi said in an interview with MSNBC anchor Chris Hayes on Monday. Pelosi has previously expressed a desire to pass a “clean” CR, meaning that it would not include any controversial provisions that might delay its passage.

Pelosi also said on Monday that funding the government was a separate fight from negotiating another coronavirus relief package, saying that the issues are on “parallel tracks.” Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin came to an informal agreement earlier this month to pass a clean CR without any provisions related to the pandemic.

The fights over funding the government and passing another relief package also comes as the Senate prepares to consider Mr. Trump’s yet-to-be-named nominee for the Supreme Court vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death last week. Senator Lindsey Graham, the chair of the Judiciary Committee, said Monday on “Hannity” that Republicans have the votes to confirm a nominee to fill the seat.

Pelosi also said in the interview with Hayes that House Democrats would not threaten to shut down the government to pressure the Senate to keep the seat vacant until after the election.

“We’re not about shutting down government. And it’s not a lever,” Pelosi said. “You think if we shut down government they would say, ‘OK, now we won’t move forward with the justice?’ No, they won’t.”

Source Article

Read more

House passes short-term spending bill to avoid government shutdown

The deal will fund the government through Dec. 11.

The House approved late Tuesday night, in a 359-57-1 vote, a stopgap bill to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the month.

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez did not vote yes or no, but “present.”

The Senate will likely vote on the measure by the end of the week — where it is also expected to pass — before it heads to President Donald Trump’s desk for his signature. The stopgap measure must pass by Oct. 1 to keep U.S. agencies open.

“We have reached an agreement with Republicans on the CR to add nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for hungry schoolchildren and families,” Pelosi said in a statement. “We also increase accountability in the Commodity Credit Corporation, preventing funds for farmers from being misused for a Big Oil bailout.”

“To help the millions of families struggling to keep food on the table during the pandemic, Democrats have renewed the vital, expiring lifeline of Pandemic EBT for a full year and enabled our fellow Americans in the territories to receive this critical nutrition assistance,” she continued. “Democrats secured urgently needed assistance for schoolchildren to receive meals despite the coronavirus’s disruption of their usual schedules, whether virtual or in-person, and expanded Pandemic EBT access for young children in child care. We also extended key flexibility for states to lower administrative requirements on SNAP for families in the middle of this crisis.”

The surprise late-night agreement came just days after talks crumbled late last week over policy disagreements.

Democrats have contended that the farm aid for the Commodity Credit Corporation — a GOP priority — “wasn’t help for farmers” but was “a bottomless, unaccountable political slush fund.”

“House Democrats already passed more than $30 billion in targeted and tailored emergency aid to farm country in response to the pandemic as part of the Heroes Act, including language to ensure greater transparency and accountability with the Administration’s use of the Commodity Credit Corporation, including decreasing the Secretary’s ability to spend billions of taxpayer dollars without telling Congress,” the aide added.

After lengthy negotiations did not produce a bipartisan agreement with Republicans, House Democrats introduced their own proposal Monday afternoon funding government until Dec. 11, moving “full steam ahead” on a vote Tuesday, according to a senior Democratic aide.

Recognizing the lack of an agreement, a senior House Democratic aide warned that the bill “may get stuck in the Senate” after House passage,

Read more

House passes funding bill with GOP support to avert looming government shutdown

The House passed a bipartisan spending bill on Tuesday after reaching a deal with the White House to avert a government shutdown at the end of the month, keeping the federal government open until December.



a person standing in front of United States Supreme Court Building


© Provided by NBC News


The Democratic-controlled House voted 359-57 on the interim spending measure to fund the government through December 11th. The legislation, known as a continuing resolution or “CR,” was hailed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., in a statement Tuesday, who reached the deal with Republican leaders and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.

The legislation boosts funding for nutrition benefits to families, aid to farmers, and funds various parts of the federal government.

“We have reached an agreement with Republicans on the CR to add nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for hungry schoolchildren and families,” Pelosi said. “We also increase accountability in the Commodity Credit Corporation, preventing funds for farmers from being misused for a Big Oil bailout.”

The resolution now heads to the Senate, but unclear when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., will bring it to the floor. McConnell told reporters on Tuesday that he worked with Pelosi to replenish the Commodity Credit Corporation for aid to go directly to farmers.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., however, criticized the process, saying that the resolution is only a temporary stopgap measure.

“A lot of to and froing. A lot of people wanted this, a lot of people wanted that. A lot of people didn’t want this, a lot of people didn’t want that,” he said. “But we have an agreement that will keep the government functioning for the people from now until December 11th.”

He added, “I’m hopeful that everyone will put their heads together to get the appropriation process done and we’ll probably do it in an omnibus, not single appropriation bills. Which is not a good way to do it either.”

Video: To prevent a complete shutdown, keep me at 50% in a liberal state and 75% in a conservative state: Fertitta (CNBC)

To prevent a complete shutdown, keep me at 50% in a liberal state and 75% in a conservative state: Fertitta

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

House overwhelmingly passes bipartisan spending deal to avert government shutdown

The deal was negotiated by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in a chaotic series of events over the past several days. Talks abruptly collapsed late Friday just as a deal appeared within reach, and Pelosi released a partisan bill on Monday that was swiftly rejected by Republicans. But on Tuesday morning, Pelosi and Mnuchin resumed negotiations, and Pelosi announced late Tuesday that they had reached a deal.

The sticking point was demands from the Trump administration and Republicans — along with a handful of largely farm-state House Democrats — for an infusion of money into a farm bailout program that Trump has used to repay farmers hurt by his trade policies. In exchange for agreeing to the bailout money, Pelosi secured about $8 billion for a variety of nutrition programs, including for schoolchildren affected by the coronavirus pandemic — a significantly larger sum than had been on the table Friday.

The short-term spending legislation — known as a “continuing resolution,” or CR — would keep the federal government funded through Dec. 11.

“We have reached an agreement with Republicans on the CR to add nearly $8 billion in desperately needed nutrition assistance for hungry schoolchildren and families,” Pelosi said. “Democrats secured urgently needed assistance for schoolchildren to receive meals despite the coronavirus’s disruption of their usual schedules.”

There was no immediate comment from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), but in light of the strong vote in the House, the Senate looked likely to approve the legislation.

Congress needs to pass a spending bill by Sept. 30, the last day in the 2020 fiscal year, or large portions of the government would begin to shut down. The bill also must be signed by Trump ahead of the shutdown deadline.

Even with much attention on Capitol Hill focused on the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there was little appetite on either side for brinkmanship over a government shutdown.

Republicans secured provisions in the stopgap spending bill to replenish a $30 billion borrowing fund called the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a New Deal-era program that Trump has used to reimburse farmers harmed by his trade policies and tariffs. Democratic leaders opposed the additional money, partly because they say Trump could use it for political purposes.

At a campaign rally in Wisconsin last week, Trump announced a new package of aid for farmers from the CCC, which he has used in an unprecedented way. Under previous administrations, the CCC was used for much more limited purposes, and some Democrats charge that Trump has essentially turned it into a slush fund.

But there are also several endangered House Democrats who support the program, including Cindy Axne and Abby Finkenauer of Iowa, freshman members who flipped GOP-held seats in 2018 and now face tough reelection races. Axne and Finkenauer both signed a letter along with Iowa’s two Republican senators, Charles E. Grassley and Joni Ernst, blasting exclusion of the CCC money from the

Read more

House approves spending bill in effort to avoid government shutdown during pandemic

The House easily passed a temporary government-wide funding bill Tuesday evening in a bipartisan effort to keep the government running through the beginning of December.

The House voted 359-57 to approve the stop gap measure that will keep the government open through December 11. 56 Republicans and Rep. Justin Amash, I-Mich. voted against the measure, while Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., voted present.

Agreement on the bill came after considerable behind-the-scenes battling over proposed add-ons. The final agreement gives the administration continued immediate authority to dole out Agriculture Department subsidies in the run-up to Election Day. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., retreated from an initial draft that sparked a furor with Republicans and farm-state Democrats.

Instead, in talks Tuesday, Pelosi restored a farm aid funding patch sought by the administration, which has sparked the ire of Democrats who said it plays political favorites as it gives out bailout money to farmers and ranchers.

MNUCHIN, PELOSI HAVE ‘INFORMAL AGREEMENT’ TO GO FORWARD WITH GOVERNMENT FUNDING PACKAGE, SOURCE SAYS

In return, Pelosi won COVID-related food aid for the poor, including a higher food benefit for families whose children are unable to receive free or reduced lunches because schools are closed over the coronavirus. Another add-on would permit states to remove hurdles to food stamps and nutrition aid to low-income mothers that are more difficult to clear during the pandemic.

The deal permitted the measure to speed through the House after a swift debate that should ensure smooth sailing in the GOP-held Senate before next Wednesday’s deadline. There’s no appetite on either side for a government shutdown.

The measure is the bare minimum accomplishment for Capitol Hill’s powerful Appropriations committees, who pride themselves on their deal-making abilities despite gridlock in other corners of Congress. It came after bipartisan negotiations on a huge COVID-19 relief package imploded and appear unlikely to be rekindled — especially since the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has upended U.S. politics.

“We need to keep the government open but we also need additional COVID relief for the American people,” said Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla.

GOP-LED SENATE EYEING NEW ‘TARGETED’ COVID BILL 

The legislation — called a continuing resolution, or CR, in Washington-speak — would keep every federal agency running at current funding levels through Dec. 11, which will keep the government afloat past an election that could reshuffle Washington’s balance of power.

The measure also extends many programs whose funding or authorizations lapse on Sept. 30, including the federal flood insurance program, highway and transit programs, and a long set of extensions of various health programs, such as a provision to prevent Medicaid cuts to hospitals that serve many poor people.

It also finances the possible transition to a new administration if Joe Biden wins the White House and would stave off an unwelcome COVID-caused increase in Medicare Part B premiums for outpatient doctor visits.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The underlying stopgap measure deals with the 30% of the federal government’s day-to-day

Read more