House Republicans work to close gender gap despite Trump headwinds

More than that, though, the GOP — which has long shunned identity politics, at least when it comes to gender — has experienced a real attitude and cultural shift around electing more women to Congress, according to interviews with over a dozen lawmakers, candidates, operatives and aides. Women are stepping up to run, citing their gender as an asset and answering the siren sounded by party leaders — even as President Donald Trump remains divisive among women of both parties.

“The 2018 cycle was a motivating factor,” said retiring Rep. Susan Brooks (Ind.), one of just 13 Republican women in the House and head of recruitment efforts for the party’s campaign arm. “Even though we had been recruiting and helping women candidates, we realized we did need to shift some strategy and do far more.”

And so far, the initiative has paid off: 227 Republican women filed to run for the House this cycle and 94 of them won primaries, shattering past records on both fronts. Previously, the highest number of Republican women to run for the House was 130, while the highest number of GOP women to win primaries was 53, according to the Center for American Women and Politics.

“I’m honored and proud to help change the discussion,” said Diana Harshbarger, a pharmacist who is almost certainly joining Congress next year after beating out several male primary opponents in a deep red seat in Tennessee. “Conservative Republican women are alive and well and I hope I can be an inspiration.”

But the big test will come in November, when the House GOP is once again facing tough political headwinds. And with Trump at the top of the ticket, Republicans fear that the same suburban revolt that wiped out 10 of the House GOP’s women last cycle — and delivered the majority to Democrats — could bring another soul-crushing disappointment for House Republicans, despite their successful recruitment and primary efforts.

And making things more precarious is that many of the GOP’s top female recruits are running in some of the toughest races in the country, meaning that even if Republicans make gains in these districts, they could be easily erased the following cycle.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even acknowledged that the party’s biggest hurdle is still pushing Republican women through primaries in ruby red seats that will guarantee their entry — and long-term careers — in Congress.

“The challenge is when you start getting women and minorities just in the swing seats,” McCarthy (R-Calif.) said in an interview. “I want people to be in leadership. So going into these safer seats, I’ve worked hard to provide that opportunity as well.”

Republicans are guaranteed to add at least five new women to their conference next year, thanks to primary victories by female candidates in deep red seats, including Marjorie Taylor Green, a controversial nominee in Georgia who has espoused racist views. That gives Republican much needed wiggle room in the numbers game.

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Democrats Narrow Gap in Washington District Trump Won by 7 Points Amid Push to Expand House Seats

As Democrats look to push House Republicans further into the minority, the Democratic challenger in a Washington state House race has narrowed her deficit against the Republican incumbent to make it a virtual neck-and-neck contest, according to an internal Democratic poll provided to Newsweek.

Despite President Donald Trump winning Washington state’s 3rd Congressional District in 2016 by more than seven points, Democrat Carolyn Long is trailing Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wa.) by just two points, within the survey’s margin of error. In 2018, Herrera Beutler bested Long by roughly 16,400 votes, or 5.4 percent, and is serving her fifth term.

Long is one of 37 candidates that House Democrats hope will help them expand their majority in the lower chamber.

The poll, conducted by the progressive firm GQR, shows Long at 47 percent and Herrera Beutler at 49 percent. Four percent of voters in the longtime Republican district, which is located in the southwest region of the state, remain undecided.

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Abby Olmstead, Long’s campaign manager, said of the race, “the stakes have never been higher.”

Olmstead said the choice between the candidates is clear.

“In 2020, we face the choice between reelecting a career politician who has spent a decade staying silent, who is never available to her constituents and who is continuously working with Trump to dismantle access to healthcare,” Olmstead said. “Or Carolyn—who will be a hard-working, present, accountable, representative that always puts the people of Southwest Washington first.”

Democrat Carolyn Long
A new internal poll by Democrats shows challenger Carolyn Long, a Democrat, trailing the Republican incumbent for Washington state’s 3rd Congressional District, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler by two points.
Courtesy of the Carolyn Long campaign

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Long enjoys a net +11 favorability rating, compared to Herrera Beutler’s net +5 rating. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is nearly tied with Trump in the district: 47 percent to 48 percent, with 6 percent undecided. A separate poll conducted last month showed Long was four points down.

The Herrera Beutler campaign questioned the legitimacy of the poll and accused Long of being “desperate.”

“This is the time of year when desperate campaigns try to convince reporters to write about outlying polls from outlying pollsters with outlying results,” spokesperson Parker Truax told Newsweek in a statement. “Jaime is going to win.”

The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) also questioned the poll’s credibility and said Democrats’ spending habits in the district conflict with their suggestion that the race is virtually tied.

“If Carolyn Long were only down two points, the Democrats would be spending here like it’s nobody’s business,” NRCC spokesperson Torunn Sinclair told Newsweek in a statement. “They’re not, they currently have no money reserved, this is a fake poll and Carolyn Long is going to lose again.”

Herrera Beutler’s campaign did not respond to Newsweek‘s request for comment.

Though the internal polling suggests a public shift toward Long, election forecasters aren’t buying it.

Cook Political Report still rates the contest as likely Republican,

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Barr’s Approach Closes Gap Between Justice Dept. and White House

WASHINGTON — When the top federal prosecutor in Washington recently accused the local police of arresting protesters without probable cause, Attorney General William P. Barr stepped in.

Mr. Barr, who has frequently voiced his support for police officers, brought in the U.S. attorney, Michael Sherwin, to meet with the chief of the Washington police and other top law enforcement officials, escalating the local dispute to the top of the Justice Department.

The meeting grew heated, but ultimately, Mr. Sherwin backed down, according to three people familiar with the encounter. Mr. Barr told Mr. Sherwin to write a letter that said he had not meant to imply that the police had acted unlawfully. In a nod to Mr. Sherwin’s original objection, the Washington police are working with prosecutors to identify video and other evidence to back up the arrests.

The episode was an example of Mr. Barr’s approach to running the Justice Department under President Trump: an agenda that is squarely in line not only with the White House but also with the Trump campaign’s law-and-order platform and assertions that Democrats have made the United States less safe. Critics argued that the department’s norm of independence from politics, widely seen as an anticorruption measure that grew out of the post-Watergate era, was at risk.

Mr. Barr has threatened legal action against Democratic leaders who sparred with the president over stay-at-home orders during the pandemic and echoed Mr. Trump’s accusation that they were not tough enough on protesters during nationwide unrest over race and policing. He led federal agents who patrolled the streets of Washington against the wishes of the mayor. And this week, the Justice Department seemed to play into the president’s efforts to undermine voting by mail, making an unusual disclosure about an investigation into nine discarded military mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania.

In public comments, Mr. Barr has expounded on topics outside of what recent attorneys general publicly discussed during an election, particularly his sharp critiques of Democrats and his grim pronouncements that they could destroy democracy. In a recent interview with a Chicago journalist, after acknowledging that he is not supposed to wade into politics but narrowly defining that as campaign appearances, Mr. Barr declared that the country would “go down a socialist path” if it elects former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Under Mr. Barr, the Justice Department is as close as it has been to the White House in a half-century, historians said. Not since John N. Mitchell steered the Nixon re-election effort from the fifth floor of the Justice Department has an attorney general wielded the power of the office to so bluntly serve a presidential campaign, they said.

“The norm has been that attorneys general try to keep the reputation of the department bright and shiny as a nonpartisan legitimate arm of the government that needs to be trusted by everyone,” said Andrew Rudalevige, a history professor at Bowdoin College who studies the power of the presidency.

A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment.

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Gender pay gap within the White House worse than the national average: report

The gender pay gap within the White House is reportedly worse than the national average, according to an analysis by nonprofit news organization The 19th.



a group of people walking in front of Bellamy Mansion: Gender pay gap within the White House worse than the national average: report


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Gender pay gap within the White House worse than the national average: report

Analysis by the website found salaries in President Trump’s White House had a $33,300 difference between the median salary for male staffers and the median salary for female staffers.

This year, male staffers earned a median salary of around $106,000, and female staffers’ median was about $72,700.

The statistics indicate women working for the administration make around 69 cents on the male dollar, which is less than the national gender pay gap of 82 cents on the dollar.

Still, both the national numbers and the White House numbers reflect the “raw” gender pay gap, which does not account for experience, education, title or other factors that play into one’s financial earnings.

“To avoid addressing structural and institutional gender discrimination in terms of pay equity, the go-to is to talk about position and title when, in fact, that’s not what’s driving pay inequity,” said C. Nicole Mason, the president and CEO of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

Mason says that the gender pay gap is being determined by “decisions that are being made from the top down about the valuing of women’s work and how much they should be paid.”

The 19th reported Women in the Obama administration were paid roughly between 84 and 89 cents for every dollar earned by male staffers.

Conservative think tank American Enterprise Institute (AEI) reported salaries differed somewhat greatly between the Trump administration and Obama’s. The Obama administration paid women 89 cents on the dollar in 2016, compared to 63 cents on the dollar during Trump’s first year in office.

“There is no absence of qualified women,” Mason said. She added that during Obama’s terms in office the administration made a more concerted effort to place women in senior leadership positions.

In 2016, more women than men earned $100,000 in the White House under Obama.

Video: Minneapolis City Council’s ‘hypocrisy’ amid crime uptick ‘astounding,’ GOP congressional candidate says (FOX News)

Minneapolis City Council’s ‘hypocrisy’ amid crime uptick ‘astounding,’ GOP congressional candidate says

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