Police are called to a funeral wake in a pub garden

The ‘snitching’ begins! Police are called to a funeral wake in a pub garden after mourners were pictured ‘not socially distancing’

  • Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston after resident claimed no distancing
  • Landlady Sue Humphries said she had been hosting a wake for around 30 people
  • She added that ‘all our customers were in groups of six and spaced apart’ 

Police were called to a funeral wake inside a pub garden after mourners were pictured appearing to break social distancing rules amid the Government’s ‘rule of six’.

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. 

Police called the pub twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries before turning up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed.  

A Leicestershire Police spokeswoman said: ‘Police received a call just after 1.30pm yesterday reporting concerns in relation to a number of people gathering at a premises in Moat Street, Wigston, and that Covid-19 guidelines were being breached.

‘Officers have engaged with staff and others at the concerned premises who co-operated with police to ensure guidelines were being followed.’

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. Pictured: The wake

Officers visited the Old Crown in Wigston, Leicestershire yesterday after a local resident called them to claim people were not following coronavirus guidelines. Pictured: The wake

The resident who called the police took a video of people drinking outside at the back of the pub.

‘I was concerned at what I saw,’ she said. ‘There appeared to be a large group of people drinking outside the pub and they looked quite close to each other.

‘I felt I had to alert the police in case rules were being broken. I felt it was my public duty to report this and I would do the same again.’

Ms Humphries claimed she hosted a wake for 30 people on behalf of a local resident which started at 10.45am.

‘The police called me twice to check that my customers were following the coronavirus rules,’ she said.

‘I spoke to all of customers to remind them of the rules but we always ensure that the rules are being followed properly at all times. All our customers were in groups of six and spaced apart.

‘After the two calls the police just turned up at the pub. They asked us to move some people from the back of the pub to the front to help with social distancing so we did.

‘They left satisfied that no rules were being broken.

Police called the pub (pictured) twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries then turned up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed

Police called the pub (pictured) twice and spoke to the landlady Sue Humphries then turned up unannounced to check that the rules were being followed

‘The last of the people from the wake left at about 5.30pm. We were a lot less busy after they left.’

Ms Humphries said she reopened the pub on August 1 after lockdown.

The incident came ahead of Oadby

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My family paid $7K for my uncle’s funeral. My cousins were poor, but then renovated their kitchen. Should I ask for it back?

Dear Moneyist,

My two sisters and I recently paid over $7,000 for the funeral of our uncle, because he had no insurance and his three children claimed they had no money to do so. Soon after the burial, we found out that purchases on their part were being made, mainly an $800 pair of designer shoes and another cousin remodeled his kitchen. Because of this, would it be proper to ask for repayment? I want my share back, one sister doesn’t want to anger our cousins, and the other is undecided. Thank you.

J.C.

Dear Niece,

Funerals can be exhausting, distressing, healing, uplifting — and expensive.

The median cost of a funeral is more than $7,300, according to the National Funeral Directors Association. Cremation is significantly less — between $6,000 and $7,000. Caskets and urns alone can cost thousands of dollars depending on whether they’re made of metal or cheaper wood, though some can sell for as much as $10,000 or more. It’s a business.

Not only did you take care of your uncle’s funeral costs, you feel like your cousins made a fool of you and your sisters. Without demanding to see their bank statements, however, we will never know the truth about their finances. The kitchen could be paid for on installments. The designer shoes? I can’t quite believe they cost $800. Actually, yes I can. Few things truly surprise me anymore.

The Moneyist: My late husband did not see his son in 30 years. Should I mail his son photos and other memorabilia — and risk him making a claim on his estate?

Did they take advantage of your good nature? Or did they really not have the funeral funds to bury their father? We will never know for sure. The time and stress you and your family would experience demanding this money back and trying to get it back are — for what it’s worth — not worth it. If you had paid for a birthday party or a new wide-screen TV, that would be different.

Treat it as a gift and/or a bad debt, and write it off. I’m not saying it’s not a lot of money. It is. But you split the cost with your sisters, and they are already split on whether or not they should ask for the money back. Asking for it back is no guarantee of success, and will likely end your relationship with your cousins. To make an issue of it now would take away the dignity of your uncle’s funeral.

If you can’t find another reason to let this go, do it for him.

You can email The Moneyist with any financial and ethical questions related to coronavirus at [email protected]. Want to read more?Follow Quentin Fottrell on Twitterand read more of his columns here.

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Slain Cleveland police officer’s funeral changed to Rocket Mortgage Field House

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The funeral for slain Cleveland police Det. James Skernivitz will now take place at Rocket Mortgage Field House instead of The Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in downtown Cleveland.

The start time for the service changed from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the arena that is the home of the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Skernivitz, a 22-year police veteran, is survived by a wife and three children. Calling hours are from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at the A. Ripepi and Sons Funeral Home in Middleburg Heights.

Skervinitz was working undercover on Thursday with informant Scott Dingess. Both sat in Skernivitz’s unmarked police car behind a mostly abandoned strip mall on West 67th Place, near the intersection of West 65th Street and Storer Avenue.

Three people walked up to the car and opened fire, according to police and court records. Both Skernivitz and Dingess died.

Cleveland police wrote in court records that they believe the shooting was part of an attempted robbery.

Skernivitz worked as an undercover detective in the department’s gang unit. Undercover officers wear plain clothes, drive unmarked cars and do not wear body cameras.

Three people — ages 18, 17 and 15 — are charged in connection with the shooting.

Read more from cleveland.com:

Man charged in fatal shooting of Cleveland police officer, informant held on $3 million bond

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine on slain Cleveland police officer: ‘He spent more than two decades protecting citizens of Ohio’

Two teens, man charged in fatal shooting of Cleveland police officer, informant

Two more arrested in slaying of Cleveland police officer, informant, sources say

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