19 Festive Halloween Front Porch Decor Ideas

Crows Front Porch

Gather a murder of crows at your door for a spooky Halloween front porch. Use a combination of crows created from black contact paper and artificial crows ($19, Oriental Trading) hung from fishing line to create an immersive experience that even Moira Rose would appreciate. Add a twiggy tree made from contact paper to your front door to give these feathered fiends a place to perch. Fill out the front steps with black lanterns, pumpkins and urns filled with mums.

Fall Festival Front Porch

Capture the charm of a fall festival on your doorstep with a stylish arrangement of dried grasses and white mums in large metal bins. Fill out the look with hay bales and the muted tones of heirloom pumpkins. For a little farmhouse style, paint white pumpkins with black and gray squares to create a buffalo check pattern. String beads and felt poms to create a simple and sweet garland.

Simply Creepy Front Porch

All it takes is a few plastic rats ($3, Oriental Trading) scurrying about to create a front porch display that would make anyone squeamish. Place the rodents around your front door and let them climb a ladder or perch on outdoor furniture for an infested feel. Wrap sisal rope around letter frames to craft an alarming welcome message to your door. After Halloween, swap out the door decor for a wreath and remove the rats to make your front porch guest-ready for Thanksgiving. 

Spider Web Front Porch

Giant spider webs instantly give a charming front porch a haunted house vibe. Made with braided yarn, these large webs can be reused year after year. Stretch spiderwebbing along the railing. Fill out the rest of the front porch with a variety of carved pumpkins tucked in wooden crates and large lanterns.

Haunted House Front Porch

Imposing skulls and faux gravestones ($20, Party City) give the front porch the ominous energy of a haunted mansion. Large urns holding a tower of artificial pumpkins add height to the front door display. Stick wreaths and a collection of pumpkins and mums round out this scary Halloween porch idea. 

Crafty Halloween Front Porch

Etch leaves, flowers and other natural woodland designs onto pumpkins for an enchanted fall display that will last all season. Group the pumpkins on your porch steps and adorn a few with jute or gingham bows. Add pots of fall flowers or decorative vegetables and grasses to complete this delightful Halloween porch decor idea.  

Candy Corn Front Porch

Embrace a fall favorite—candy corn—and make it the inspiration for your front porch with a yellow, orange and white color scheme. Spray paint real or artificial pumpkins. We used artificial pumpkins ($12, Target) so they can be used again and again. To create the tower of pumpkins, drill a hole through the center of each pumpkin, and secure them a dowel. Wrap yarn around foam wreath frames to create this bright trio of wreaths. Print a message and affix each word to a wreath.

Black

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Washington state garden offers useful inspiration for Sonoma County front yards

For Sandra, a “hands-on” person, it was tough to stay out of the way as a contractor and workmen gutted and completely renovated the 1950s house she and her husband, Howard, had just bought in Walla Walla, Washington.

New to the area, Sandra was keen to get to know the neighborhood. So while the men upgraded her new home to a more modern aesthetic and condition, she turned to the front garden. Each day, from a rental house a few blocks away, Sandra would come over and labor in the garden in an effort to make progress on the house and to begin to meet her neighbors.

The garden was not a garden when she started. Her first efforts were directed at a steep bank along the sidewalk, a discouraging mass of rocks knit together by a dense mat of Bermuda grass. She progressed incrementally, each day removing a few more rocks and clearing a little more area.

On the strip of land between the sidewalk and street, sheltered under an old weeping cherry tree, Sandra placed a cheerful red rustic table and chairs saved from her garden at her previous house, in Seattle. She used river-washed natural gravel to cover the soil. A big water dish for dogs and a beautifully planted pot on the table, a garden in miniature, were the finishing touches. In effect, she created a street-side living room, a place to sit and visit. The tables and chairs had provided the same function at her former home, and many conversations, cups of coffee and glasses of wine had passed over its brightly colored surface.

The steep bank took shape with plants Sandra brought from her Seattle garden, chiefly low-growing succulents like groundcover sedums, low-growing grasses like fescues and American millet grass milium effusum ‘Aureum’ — all sparely punctuated with yuccas.

“I’m not a professional gardener, but I know what I like,” Sandra said. She wanted a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant garden with a modern aesthetic that would correspond with that of the house. As the plants grew and spread, she pulled off small pieces of the sedums and planted them around the yard to limit the number of plant species used and the number of others she’d need to buy. The garden is densely planted and the succulents now merge into a solid carpet.

In the winter, the pattern made by the low-growing succulents, gray fescues, golden grasses, lamb’s ears, coral bells and gray yucca is like a soft and vibrant Persian carpet draped over the bank, with the bright and soft greens and gray and yellow hues repeating in a tapestry of color. In early summer the succulents bloom and the bank turns into a miniature meadow of little white and yellow flowers, heavily visited by tiny native bees.

The strip between the sidewalk and street, a very difficult place to garden, has been turned into a gravel garden. Sandra used the same grey-white washed rocks as under the table and chairs to cover the ground,

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Was Donald Trump’s White House Video Filmed in Front of Green Screen?

President Donald Trump released a video message on Twitter on Thursday discussing his health and the treatment he received following his COVID-19 diagnosis.



a man wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump gestures upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus. Trump's recent video led to speculation about a green screen.


© Win McNamee/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus. Trump’s recent video led to speculation about a green screen.

In the video, Trump stands in the White House grounds. There was immediate speculation that the president was not in fact outside but had used a green screen to produce a false background.

The Claim:

Social media users raised the question of a green screen once Trump tweeted his video yesterday. The claim soon gained traction on Twitter and some prominent people began asking the question. Apparent distortions in the video, like the shadows and the background appearing to be on a loop, prompted the comments.

“I think it’s pretty clearly a green screen. The sharpness of the outline and the lighting. Also it’s a very long way to bring a sick president to shoot something when you have the Rose Garden,” wrote MSNBC host Chris Hayes.

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Christopher Orr, film critic for The Atlantic, also said it appeared a green screen had been used: “Why the digital background? It’s a sunny day in DC. This could have been filmed on the actual White House lawn.”

Orr later deleted the tweet and sent another, sharing the opinion of another user that the video background was genuine. However, by then the speculation had taken off.

“This is in front of a green screen,” tweeted veteran Star Trek actor George Takei, who is a prominent social media user and a critic of the president. His tweet now has more than 4,000 retweets.

The Facts:

Hany Farid, a professor

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Adding ornamental plants to your front garden can help you be happier



a vase of flowers sitting on top of a wooden table: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
MailOnline logo

Growing just a few ornamental plants — such as daffodils or petunias — in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found.

Experts led from the Royal Horticultural Society planted blooms including azaleas, clematis and lavender in yards in low-income areas of Salford, Greater Manchester.

They then monitored the stress levels of the residents participating in the study — and explored how the additions to their gardens made them feel.



a vase of flowers sitting on top of a wooden table: Growing just a few ornamental plants ¿ such as daffodils or petunias, pictured ¿ in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found (stock image)


© Provided by Daily Mail
Growing just a few ornamental plants ¿ such as daffodils or petunias, pictured ¿ in a bare front garden can make people feel happier and less stressed, a study found (stock image)

The researchers recruited 42 residents — involving a total of 38 gardens — for the study, although some received their plants only after a year as so that they could serve as a control group in the meantime.

Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers.

They were not required to look after the plants, as the containers could ‘self water’ as they had a 22-litre in-built reservoir — the participants were encouraged to take part by gardening their plot, with help from the Royal Horticultural Society advisors.

The team measured each residents’ levels of key stress response hormone cortisol both before and after the plants were added.

They found a higher proportion of healthy daytime cortisol patterns after planting, suggesting that the residents had a better health status.

The research found that only 24 per cent of residents had healthy cortisol patterns before the plants went in, but over the year following the greening of the front gardens, this increased to 53 per cent.

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More than half of the residents in the trial said that their new garden helped them to feel happier, while two-fifths reported that the garden help them to relax and just over a quarter said that it helped them to get closer to nature.



a brick building: Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers (middle and left) to add to their bare gardens (right)


© Provided by Daily Mail
Residents were each given one tree, one shrub, one climber and enough smaller plants, bulbs and bedding plants to fill two containers (middle and left) to add to their bare gardens (right)

In-depth interviews concluded that the garden motivated people to do more gardening and renovate other areas of their property.

Residents also reported feeling the garden relaxing, adding that it gave them a sense of pride in their home, while all of them noted that the plants made them feel more cheerful and lifted their spirits when they looked at them.

‘We can now further evidence the vital need to incorporate plants into our front gardens and domestic spaces,’ said paper author and Royal Horticultural Society well-being fellow Lauriane Suyin Chalmin-Pui.

‘This will require

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Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson reveals he ripped the front gate off his house to get to work on time

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson proved his muscles aren’t just for show by ripping the front gate off his own house so that he could get to work on time.

The 48-year-old actor and fitness enthusiast shared a photo of his front gate laying in the grass near his home on Friday with a lengthy caption explaining that a power outage forced him to take matters into his own hands, literally, so that he could get back to work on the movie “Red Notice.”

“Not my finest hour, but a man’s gotta go to work. We experienced a power outage due to severe storms, causing my front gate not to open,” he wrote. “I tried to override the hydraulic system to open the gates, which usually works when power goes out – but this time it wouldn’t.”

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Johnson explained that the earliest estimate he could get for a technician to come and help was about 45 minutes.

“By this time, I know I have hundreds of production crew members waiting for me to come to work so we can start our day,” he continued. “So I did what I had to do. I pushed, pulled and ripped the gate completely off myself. Tore it out of the brick wall, severed the steel hydraulics and threw it on the grass.”

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson ripped the gate off his own house.

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson ripped the gate off his own house.
(Vivian Zink/NBC)

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The “Jumanji” star noted that his security team waited until technicians arrived and replaced the gate. In a follow-up post, he shared a pair of videos showing the repairs being done as well as the damage the massive celebrity did on his own gate.

“Maybe next time I’ll just hop the gates and call an Uber. Actually, no I won’t. There’s no fun in that,” he joked in the caption.

“Just one of those days where I wasn’t in the mood,” he concluded. “We’ve all been there.”

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The actor was anxious to get back to work on his movie “Red Notice” alongside Ryan Reynolds. The film’s production was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but resumed production earlier this month.

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