White House slams FBI chief Wray over voter fraud testimony

By Doina Chiacu



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – FBI Director Christopher Wray faced criticism from the White House for the second time in a week on Friday when President Donald Trump’s chief of staff questioned his ability to detect voter fraud as the November election draws near.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort,” undercutting the Republican president’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting before his Nov. 3 contest against Democrat Joe Biden.

Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, denigrated Wray during an interview with CBS “This Morning.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” he said without elaborating.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI were investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Meadows suggested to CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI had no comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Last week, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

That prompted Trump to retort, “I did not like his answers yesterday.”

Wray’s statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, an established method of voting in the United States.

He also continues to bristle at U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Cynthia Osterman)

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White House chief of staff Mark Meadows contradicts FBI Director Christopher Wray on voter fraud

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows disputed FBI Director Christopher Wray’s testimony to Congress on Thursday that there’s no evidence of voter fraud by mail or otherwise, and he suggested that Wray “needs to get involved on the ground.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there is any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said in an interview with “CBS This Morning” on Friday. Wray had told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that there was no evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort.”

Meadows also made reference to a Washington Post report about 500 “problematic” ballots that had been sent to some voters in North Carolina, although this was the result of a clerical error, and not voter fraud. Moreover, people can still only vote once, meaning that even if they sent in two ballots, their vote would only be counted once. Earlier this month, President Trump urged North Carolinians to vote twice, which is a felony.

“Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill,” Meadows said of Wray.

In a separate gaggle with reporters on Friday morning, Meadows also sidestepped a question from CBS News’ Ben Tracy about whether the president still had confidence in Wray.

“It’s time for Director Wray to quit, in my mind, playing footsie with transparency and delivery those documents,” Meadows said, which may have been a reference to material sought by Congress about Crossfire Hurricane, the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation into any links between 2016 Trump campaign associates and Russian meddling in the election. On Thursday, newly released records from the Justice Department first reported by CBS News showed that the primary sub-source for the Steele dossier had been the subject of an earlier counterintelligence investigation by the FBI.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly tried to sow doubts about the legitimacy of mail-in ballots, baselessly claiming that it leads to widespread voter fraud. However, the president has encouraged mail-in voting in Florida, a key swing state that is considered to be critical to his reelection.

The president has also refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power should Joe Biden win the presidential election, saying only that “we’re going to have to see what happens.” On Thursday, he told reporters, “We want to make sure the election is honest and I’m not sure that it can be.” 

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White House Slams FBI Chief Wray Over Voter Fraud Testimony | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Friday denigrated FBI Director Christopher Wray’s ability to detect voter fraud in the U.S. election and suggested that if he “drill down” more he would change his congressional testimony on the issue.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a coordinated national voter fraud effort, undercutting President Donald Trump’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting as a threat to election security.

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said on CBS “This Morning.” It was not clear what missing emails he was referring to.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI was investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Earlier in the day, Wray told the Senate Homeland Security Committee that, “We have not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it’s by mail or otherwise. We have seen voter fraud at the local level from time to time.”

Meadows suggested on CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Earlier this month, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

Both statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, a long established method of voting in the United States.

The Republican president has long bristled at that U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost now-Trump’s 2016 campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Trump repeatedly referenced Clinton’s “missing emails” during that campaign, mockingly asking Russia to help find them. A State Department investigation of Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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How to Avoid Home Improvement Fraud

When it comes to home construction, there are thousands of general contractors to choose from. The best way to narrow down the reputable contractors from the not-so-reputable ones is to do your research, ask the right questions, demand proof of credentials, and choose a contractor that works specifically in the field you need. For example, if you need roof replacement, choose a licensed roofing contractor rather than a home remodeling contractor. A vague job description can mean they specialize in a wide array of construction projects. Instead, you want a contractor who operates their business with an acute focus on roof repair and replacement.

One of the biggest problems in the home construction industry are contractor scams. It is critical to always beware of sneaky home improvement scams because they are very common. They can easily cost a homeowner thousands of dollars if they fall victim to the dishonesties. Fortunately, anyone can avoid becoming a victim of home improvement scams with the proper knowledge and attitude. Continue reading to learn some important information about identifying these kinds of scams, protecting yourself from false loans, and who to turn to if you have a bad experience with an unethical contractor.

Signs That a Contractor is Trying to Swindle You:

– They knock door-to-door and offer their business.

– They come to your door and offer you discounts for referring other clients.

– They tell you they can give you a deal because they happen to have excess materials leftover from another job.

– They give ultimatums or pressure you into making an immediate decision.

– They only accept cash payments and/or request that you pay all fees upfront.

– They know a lender and recommend that you borrow money from them.

– They tell you to get the required building permits for the work.

– They tell you that your property’s work is going to be a “demonstration.”

– They offer a lifetime warranty or improbable long-term guarantee.

– You cannot find their business number or name listed in any local directories.

Even just one of these signs is an indication that you are not working with a responsible or experienced contractor. Furthermore, you must beware of a similar scam with loans. Home improvement loan cons are just as common and detrimental. This can lead to you unknowingly signing a home equity loan with incredibly high interest rates, points, and fees. And since the contractor has already been paid by this loan, they can lose interest in the work and fail to do a good job; or worse, not complete the work at all.

How to Report a Bad Experience

If you have a bad experience like this with a contractor, first try to work it out with them. After any phone conversations, mail a certified letter to them, and in it, request a receipt. Then keep copies of all records. This paper trail is your record that the company or contractor received your letter. If this does not work, you …

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