Foundation Kitchen’s breakthrough culinary concept is coming to Charlestown in 2021

Here at Time Out Boston, we’ve been wondering lately: What will our city look like in the future? Also, what should our city look like in the future?

Given its sky-high real estate prices and myriad challenges, Boston has become one of the toughest cities in the USA for business owners, particularly those running restaurants, cafes and bars. One local company, Foundation Kitchen, is planning on opening in Charlestown in early 2021, bringing with it a new approach to doing business.

As a shared culinary workspace, Foundation Kitchen’s main focus is to unite and promote other small food and beverage companies, something that is much needed during these challenging times. Foundation Kitchen’s co-founders, the husband and wife team of Ciaran Nagle and Tara Novak, have signed a 5,723 square-foot lease to open a new culinary production and dining destination at The Graphic Lofts in Charlestown. Located directly across the street from the MBTA’s Sullivan Square Station (Orange Line), the space will be open to the public seven days a week, offering a café, wine bar and food stalls, plus cooking classes, special events and culinary pop-ups.

“Given this shift and increased demand for more healthy, local grab-and-go dining options, takeout and delivery have skyrocketed in popularity, as customers seek creative alternatives to cooking at home night after night,” said Ciaran Nagle in a statement.

“We presently have one boutique shared commercial kitchen located in Union Square, Somerville, and we’re excited about this new location opening in Charlestown,” added Tara Novak. “This shared kitchen concept is licensed for shared-use food production, and multiple other businesses may operate from our new kitchen at The Graphic. All member companies working out of our space have their own licenses, insurance, and certification, and either work from their own designated studio space or from their own pre-scheduled space within the shared kitchen”

Companies can come in and focus on their core business – making and selling food that customers enjoy and appreciate. We also work very hard to curate a community of like-minded businesses within our facilities, creating a place where owners and employees can network, while supporting, mentoring, and motivating each other.”

Stay tuned to Time Out Boston for all the latest news on the Hub.

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Local foundation dedicates memorial garden commemorating victims of addiction | Richmond Local News

Jill Cichowicz lost her twin brother, Scott Zebrowski, to an overdose in 2017. Cichowicz visited Zebrowski’s brick in the garden Saturday along with 11 family members, including her mother, Linda, and two young sons.

Linda said one of the last things her son told her before he died was that if something happened to him, he didn’t want his family to be ashamed to tell his story. Cichowicz helps run A Night For Scott, an annual local fundraiser for the Scott Zebrowski Scholarship Fund.

“We’ve cried every day, but we hope we can save somebody else’s life by telling Scott’s story,” Cichowicz said.

Dan Schneider has made it his life’s mission to save other people’s lives by sharing his son’s story in Netflix’s “The Pharmacist,” a documentary series detailing how Schneider has used his grief to help others heal.

Schneider’s son, Danny Jr., was fatally shot at the age of 22 while trying to buy crack in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward in April 1999. Schneider came to McShin’s event to speak, share his story and see a brick in the garden bearing his son’s name.

“I get a chance when I travel to tell my story, and if I can save a life in the process, it’s well worth it. [Addiction] is still horrible, and it isn’t getting better. This is a camaraderie of people who have lost their kids,” said Schneider, gesturing around him to the people milling about the garden, some smiling, some crying and hugging over bricks commemorating their lost loved ones.

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