The Block’s Jade Joyce reveals she fell ill and was forced to spend a day in bed during kitchen week

The Block’s Jade Joyce reveals she fell ill and was forced to spend a day in bed during kitchen week

It was another tough week on the work site for The Block’s Jade and Daniel Joyce.

And on Friday, Jade, 34, revealed to 9Now that amid the drama of kitchen week, she was suffering from a food allergy.

The mother-of-three said: ‘You don’t have time to be sick when you’re a mum, and you don’t have time to be sick on The Block, that’s for sure.’

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'You don't have time to be sick that's for sure': The Block's Jade Joyce revealed she was ill and forced to spend a day in bed after suffering from a food allergy during kitchen week

‘You don’t have time to be sick that’s for sure’: The Block’s Jade Joyce revealed she was ill and forced to spend a day in bed after suffering from a food allergy during kitchen week 

She was left with swollen, red hands and feet, itching, vomiting and diarrhoea.   

The Block’s on site nurse confirmed her food allergy symptoms, but Jade said wasn’t sure what food caused her to feel ill.

She was so unwell she spent a day in bed and missed out on an important visit from their real estate agent. 

Symptoms: She told 9Now she wasn't sure what food caused her to feel ill and that she was left with swollen, red hands (pictured) and feet, itching, vomiting and diarrhoea

Symptoms: She told 9Now she wasn’t sure what food caused her to feel ill and that she was left with swollen, red hands (pictured) and feet, itching, vomiting and diarrhoea 

Feeling unwell: She even shared a video diary on Instagram in which she said she was 'tired, sleep deprived and sick' in the caption. Jade added: 'This is not uncommon for me but it did suck spending most of Saturday in bed'

Feeling unwell: She even shared a video diary on Instagram in which she said she was ‘tired, sleep deprived and sick’ in the caption. Jade added: ‘This is not uncommon for me but it did suck spending most of Saturday in bed’

She even shared a video diary on Instagram in which she said she was ‘tired, sleep deprived and sick’ in the caption.

‘A food allergy this week caused vomiting, diarrhoea, swollen red hands and feet and itching all over!

‘This is not uncommon for me but it did suck spending most of Saturday in bed,’ she added.

Despite feeling unwell, Jade was optimistic about her circumstances during kitchen week. 

Health first: After the experience, she said: 'Anaphylaxis and allergies — that sort of stuff is quite serious, you do have to be careful and mindful of it'. Pictured is Jade with her husband Daniel

Health first: After the experience, she said: ‘Anaphylaxis and allergies — that sort of stuff is quite serious, you do have to be careful and mindful of it’. Pictured is Jade with her husband Daniel

She told 9Now: ‘I suppose I probably picked the best week to be sick to be honest, because it was kitchen week, so Kinsman were in there a lot of the time putting in the kitchen [cabinetry], and we had Christian Cole who delivered his island bench.’

After the experience, she said: ‘Anaphylaxis and allergies — that sort of stuff is quite serious, you do have to be careful and mindful of it.’

This week, Jade and her husband Daniel had a handcrafted island bench by Christian Cole installed in their kitchen as the ‘game changing’ idea for their house.

The Block continues on Sunday from 7pm on Channel Nine 

Big week: This week, Jade and her husband Daniel had a handcrafted island bench by Christian Cole installed in their kitchen as the 'game changing' idea for their house. Pictured is Daniel (right) with one of their workers

Big week: This week, Jade and her husband Daniel had a handcrafted

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House approves second bill aimed at forced labor in China

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the second time in two weeks, the House on Wednesday approved a bill aimed at cracking down on U.S. imports of goods made with the forced labor of detained ethnic minorities in China.

The bill would require publicly traded companies in the U.S. to disclose whether any of their goods — or any part of their supply chain — can be traced to internment camps or factories suspected of using forced labor of Muslim Uighurs or other ethnic minorities in China.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jennifer Wexton, D-Va., was approved 253-163 and now goes to the Senate.


Its passage follows approval last week of a bill aimed at barring U.S. imports of goods produced in the vast Xinjiang region of northwestern China on the presumption that they were likely made with forced labor. That bill, authored by Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., was approved Sept. 22 on 406-3 vote.

If enacted into law, the two proposals could have significant ripple effects in global trade by forcing companies to avoid a region that produces 80% of the cotton in China, as well as tomatoes and manufactured goods.

Lawmakers say the measures are needed to press China to stop a campaign that has resulted in the detention of more than 1 million Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic groups under brutal conditions.

“If America does not speak out for human rights in China because of commercial interest, we lose all moral authority to speak about human rights anywhere in the world,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a floor speech last week.

Wexton, whose northern Virginia district is home to one of the largest Uighur communities in the U.S., said her bill would inform investors and markets about active exploitation occurring in one of the largest ongoing human rights violations in the world.

“For years, the government of the People’s Republic of China has been engaged in the mass internment of religious minorities in the Xinjiang region,” Wexton said. The camps supply materials for some of the largest companies in the world, “and some of these products are finding their way to U.S. consumers,” including cellphones and T-shirts, Wexton said.

While the U.S. has long banned imports made with forced labor, traditional human rights monitoring efforts are thwarted in tightly controlled regions such as in northwestern China, Wexton and other lawmakers said. Travel to the area is restricted. Auditors have been detained and threatened, and workers intimidated, they said.

Wexton’s bill directs the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to issue rules requiring publicly traded company to issue yearly reports disclosing imports that originate in or are sourced from Xinjiang, because of the strong likelihood they were made with forced labor.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce opposes both House bills, arguing they would likely cause U.S. companies to cease doing business in Xinjiang altogether. That outcome would harm legitimate producers and manufacturers, because there is no effective way to inspect and audit suppliers in the region, the chamber said.

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Pelosi warns House could be forced to decide presidential election

Washington — With the presidential election just 36 days away, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is outlining a scenario in which the House of Representatives is forced to decide the outcome of the 2020 race for the White House, telling her Democratic caucus that the possibility underscores the need for the party to expand its majority in the House and win control of more state House delegations.



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In a letter to House Democrats on Sunday, Pelosi detailed a situation that has not arisen for more than a century, in which neither Joe Biden nor President Trump wins the 270 electoral votes required to win a majority of the 538-vote Electoral College. If that happens, a newly elected House would decide the fate of the presidency in January, with each state casting a single vote, as required by the 12th Amendment.

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“Instead of giving every member of Congress a vote, the 12th Amendment gives each state one vote, which is determined by a vote of the state’s delegation,” Pelosi, of California, said to her fellow House Democrats. “In other words, how many state delegations the Democrats win in this upcoming election could determine who our next president is.”

The Constitution, Pelosi continues, states that a presidential candidate “must receive a majority of the state delegations to win” in the event that the election goes to the House.

“We must achieve that majority of delegations or keep the Republicans from doing so,” she said in her appeal to House Democrats.

Politico was the first to report Pelosi’s efforts to mobilize Democrats.

While Democrats hold a majority of seats in the House, Republicans currently control a slim majority of 26 state House delegations and Democrats control 23. One state, Pennsylvania, has a split delegation, with nine Republican members of the House and nine Democratic members.

According to the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia, which analyzed the upcoming House races, 26 House delegations at least lean Republican and 20 at least lean Democratic. Four are toss-ups: Pennsylvania, Iowa, Minnesota and Michigan.

Pelosi stressed the importance of supporting the political action committee working to elect Democrats to Congress and expand the number of state delegations controlled by the party.

“Simply put, this strategy to protect our democracy and elect Joe Biden will take an all out effort and resources,” she said.

Presidential electors are scheduled to meet and cast their votes in their respective states December 14. On January 6, the Senate and House are set to assemble in a joint session of Congress to count the electoral votes and declare the election results.

The 20th Amendment requires the new Congress to convene at noon on January 3, unless the previous Congress passes a law changing the date.

Pelosi is not alone in raising the possibility of the House deciding the result of the presidential election. During a rally in Pennsylvania on

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US House votes to ban Xinjiang imports over forced labor

The US House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to ban imports from China’s Xinjiang region, vowing to stop what lawmakers say is systematic forced labor by the Uighur community.

Despite opposition by US businesses, the act passed 406-3 in a sign of growing outrage over Xinjiang, where activists say more than one million Uighurs and other mostly Muslim Turkic-speaking people have been incarcerated in camps.

“Tragically, the products of the forced labor often end up here in American stores and homes,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said before the vote.

“We must send a clear message to Beijing: These abuses must end now.”

The Uighur Forced Labor Prevention Act still needs to be passed by the Senate, which may have limited time before November 3 elections.

The United States already bans products made through slavery but the act would put a blanket ban on products from Xinjiang, saying that forced labor is inextricably linked to the region’s economy.

“We know forced labor is widespread and systematic and exists both within and outside the mass internment camps,” said Representative Jim McGovern, a Democrat who helped lead the bipartisan act.

“These facts are confirmed by the testimony of former camp detainees, satellite imagery and official leaked documents from the Chinese government,” he said on the House floor.

Republican Representative Chris Smith said: “We cannot be silent. We must demand an end to these barbaric practices and accountability from the Chinese government.”

Xinjiang is a global hub for cotton with one study by a labor group estimating that 20 percent of the garments imported into the United States contain at least some yarn from the region.

The act passed despite criticism from the US Chamber of Commerce, the premier business lobby, which argued that the law would prohibit legitimate commerce rather than find ways to root out products from forced labor.

After the act was introduced, the State Department issued an advisory that it said would educate US companies in Xinjiang and the Customs and Border Protection Agency said it was banning specific products traced to forced labor in the region.

McGovern criticized the efforts by President Donald Trump’s administration, saying: “These piecemeal actions fall far short of addressing a regional economic system that is built upon a foundation of forced labor and repression.”

Activists and witnesses say that China is seeking to forcibly homogenize the Uighur population in re-education camps including by restricting the practice of Islam.

China argues that it is providing vocational training to reduce the allure of extremism.

Former national security advisor John Bolton wrote in a recent book that Trump voiced support for the camps when his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping explained them to him.

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House passes bill aimed at imports tied to Uyghur forced labor

A bill aimed at shining a light on corporations benefiting from the use of China’s forced labor camps, which have targeted Uyghur Muslims in China’s Xinjiang region, passed the House in a 229-187 vote on Wednesday.



a group of people looking at a laptop: House passes bill aimed at imports tied to Uyghur forced labor


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House passes bill aimed at imports tied to Uyghur forced labor

The Uyghur Forced Labor Disclosure Act of 2020 – spearheaded by Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.) – would require companies that are publicly traded in the United States and do business within the region to disclose information on their supply chains, including whether their products could be made by forced labor.

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Proponents of the legislation argue it is a step in the right direction in taking a stand against human rights abuses in the region.

“This legislation is essential to protect American investors and consumers through stronger disclosure requirements alerting them to Chinese and international companies whose operations enable the mass internment of Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities,” Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said during debate.

“It represents a clear and material risk to shared values and the corporate reputations of these companies and US investors and consumers,” McGovern added.

Critics argued that while they agree the United States needs to take action to crackdown on human rights violations, certain provisions in the bill that could place unnecessary regulatory burdens on companies. Republicans also took aim at Democrats for not having the bill go through the committee process.

“While the bill takes strong action to ensure American businesses are not complicit in China’s forced labor programs, there are outstanding concerns in the bill that may harm U.S. businesses. For instance, the bill requires public companies to file disclosures with the SEC if they imported manufactured goods or other materials that originated in or are sourced in the Xinjiang Uyghur autonomous region and disclose whether those goods originated in forced labor camps,” Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-Ariz.) said on the floor ahead of the vote.

“These entities would also have to disclose the nature and extent of the commercial activity related to each good or material, the gross revenue, and net profits attributable, and whether they intend to continue importing the goods. China’s atrocities against Uyghurs and other Muslim minority groups must come to an end and we voted on that bill yesterday in a bipartisan fashion.”

The bill was brought to the floor as Republicans have repeatedly slammed Democrats over not being hard enough on China, making it a key component of their campaign strategy.

Video: U.S. House passes stopgap funding bill to avoid government shutdown (Reuters)

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House to consider bills on Chinese goods made with forced labor, Pelosi says

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 18, 2020.

Al Drago | Reuters

Lawmakers will consider two bills next week on goods made with forced labor from China’s Xinjiang region, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Friday, with one that would restrict imports and another requiring publicly traded U.S. companies to make disclosures on supply chains.

“If we refused to speak out about human rights in China because of commercial interests, then we lose all moral authority to speak about human rights any place in the world,” Pelosi said.

Relations with China have become an issue in campaigning for the Nov. 3 U.S. elections, with Republican President Donald Trump running for re-election against his Democratic challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden. Control of Congress is up for grabs, with Pelosi’s fellow Democrats trying to retain control of the House and hoping to gain control of the Senate, where Republicans have a small majority.

Trump and his fellow Republicans have sought to portray Democrats as weak on China, which Democrats dispute.

In her remarks on China at her weekly news conference on Friday, Pelosi noted that she has been a critic of China on issues such as trade and human rights for more than 30 years.

The United States and other countries have been ratcheting up pressure on China over its treatment of Uighur Muslims in the remote Xinjiang region, where the United Nations cites credible reports as saying 1 million Muslims held in camps have been put to work.

China has rejected allegations of forced labor in Xinjiang and criticized the United States for meddling in its internal affairs.

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House Dems Call For Investigation Into Forced Hysterectomy Claims

Democratic members of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform called for a federal investigation on Tuesday into allegations that detainees at a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility in Georgia were receiving unwarranted hysterectomies.

Reports of inadequate conditions for both detainees and employees were the subject of a whistleblower letter filed with the Office of Joseph V. Cuffari, the Inspector General at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), on Monday. In the letter, a nurse at Georgia’s Irwin County Detention Center (ICDC) alleged that some detainees had hysterectomies performed on them without explanation. Conditions at the ICDC were often allegedly unsanitary, even in areas reserved for medical examinations or quarantining detainees.

In the Tuesday letter to the DHS Inspector General, House Committee on Oversight and Reform Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney and Chairman Jamie Raskin of the Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties requested “an emergency investigation into shocking allegations of medical atrocities and detainee mistreatment” at the ICDC.

According to the letter, members of the committee visited the ICDC in September 2019, “during which they observed alarmingly urgent health and safety issues.” Although the DHS said the committee’s findings would be factored into future inspection visits to the detention center, no progress updates were made to the committee.

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Maloney and Raskin requested that Cuffari schedule a briefing for an update on the DHS’s findings, incorporating any findings regarding the allegation in the whistleblower letter.

Newsweek reached out to the office of the DHS Inspector General for comment.

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Some Democratic lawmakers called for an investigation into allegations of “medical atrocities” that took place at an immigrant detention center in Georgia.
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In the letter detailing the alleged abuses at ICDC released by advocacy group Project South, whistleblower Dawn Wooten, a registered nurse employed by ICDC, said the number of hysterectomies performed on detained immigrant women raised a “red flag.” Wooten described the doctor performing the hysterectomies as “the uterus collector.”

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“Everybody he sees, he’s taking all their uteruses out or he’s taken their tubes out,” Wooten said. “What in the world.”

Wooten also alleged that hysterectomies are performed without consent.

“I’ve had several inmates tell me that they’ve been to see the doctor and they’ve had hysterectomies and they don’t know why they went or why they’re going,” Wooten said.

Some requests by detainees for medical attention were allegedly shredded, according to Wooten. Medical and quarantine areas were also allegedly cleaned haphazardly, leaving the floors and tables in examination rooms dirty.

In a Tuesday statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that if the allegations about the conditions at the ICDC were true, they constituted a “staggering abuse of human rights.”

“Congress and the American people need to know why and under what conditions so many women, reportedly without their informed consent, were pushed to undergo this extremely invasive and life-altering procedure,” Pelosi added.

Jewish advocacy group Bend the Arc said ICE’s actions were tantamount to “genocide.”

“Forced sterilization is genocide,”

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