Hope Hicks returned to the White House to pull Trump across the finish line. Then coronavirus hit.

Two days later, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a national pandemic.

Since then, the virus has claimed more than 212,000 American lives, tanked the economy and forced millions out of their jobs or school, imperiling the president’s reelection prospects. But it may never have been more palpable for Trump than the moment last week when Hicks took ill — closely foreshadowing his own sickness.

Hicks is rarely seen — her disdain for the spotlight is matched by her loyalty to the man who loves nothing more. But for the president she is ever-present. Whatever her title, her unspoken job description has been to prevent reality from intruding on him. She has managed his moods and counseled him on nearly everything, from the most substantive to the trivial. Until last week, she spent more time with him than almost anyone else outside his family.

“She is trusted because she isn’t driving her own policy agenda. She is looking out for him,” said former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, who has worked closely with Hicks. “It’s so important for him to have a voice in the room that’s not trying to do anything other than be strictly helpful to him. She is a confidante, an adviser and a strategist.”

But when a reporter broke the news of Hicks’s coronavirus diagnosis last week, it exposed a contagion at the White House that has presented Trump with his biggest challenge at the defining moment of his presidency. It has placed exactly the kind of scrutiny on Hicks that she abhors and put her movements at the center of a conversation about the president’s handling of the nation’s most deadly pandemic in a century.

This story is based on interviews with 12 current and former administration officials or others close to Hicks, many of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak about her and her recent diagnosis.

Hicks had tested negative last Wednesday, the morning after Trump’s first debate with Joe Biden, but she started feeling unwell at a rally in Duluth, Minn., that night. She quarantined herself on Air Force One on the return trip, discreetly enough that other staffers did not know she was ill. When the plane landed, she exited from the rear entrance.

The next morning, Hicks reported for work at the White House and tested positive for the coronavirus. She returned home to begin isolating — but told only the president and a small circle of senior staff, including chief of staff Mark Meadows. Many colleagues, including one aide who had been near her during her potentially contagious period, were enraged when they only learned about it several hours later through the gossip vine or White House contact tracers; two said they would have curtailed their contact with other people and taken a test immediately had they known sooner. Several aides said they suspected there might be a positive case in the West Wing when co-workers started wearing masks, but by the time they learned

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Montana presses to finish census, eyeing 2nd House seat

HELENA, Mont. — A complete count of Montana’s households could come with a big reward — a second seat in Congress and millions of federal dollars annually. But the 2020 census deadline remains in flux, making it uncertain if census takers will finish counting the vast, rural state.

Projections show that Montana would gain another seat in the U.S. House of Representatives after the census, but a study published earlier this month found that a shortened deadline for collecting data could cost the state the rewards. The findings gained urgency Monday when the Census Bureau pulled forward the deadline to Oct. 5.

The study, published by the American Statistical Association, found that under the Sept. 30 deadline, both Montana and Florida could lose seats in the U.S. House that they would have taken from California and Ohio were the deadline extended through October.

With over 1 million people, Montana’s congressional district is the nation’s most populous. Experts say a second House seat is a prize the state can scarcely afford to lose.

The situation is even more urgent for the state’s eight Native American tribes, which rely on an accurate census count for federal aid worth millions of dollars. Without an extended deadline, their tribal lands are poised for a historic undercount.

A judge gave Montana some hope when she issued a preliminary injunction on Sept. 25 to prevent the Trump administration from winding down census operations on Sept. 30. The last-minute ruling came after it emerged that top census officials believed a shortened deadline could hinder a full count.

But the ruling’s meaning remains unclear. On Monday, the U.S. Secretary of Commerce announced in a tweet that census takers would stop knocking on doors and questionnaires would be due Oct. 5, despite the ruling.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration has appealed.

Kendra Miller with Montana’s Districting and Apportionment Commission said the uncertainty around the deadline has been “quite a rollercoaster” and she hopes Congress will extend it.

She said the census operations, hampered by the pandemic, have been “like a train heading for a crash.”

Recent Census Bureau data shows that less than 95% of Montana households have been counted, with just Louisiana and Alabama tallying less. In more than 30 states, over 98% of households have been counted.

“We continue to watch all these other states move closer and closer to complete enumeration, and we simply can’t get there on time,” Miller said.

Former Montana Rep. Pat Williams, in the U.S. House from 1979 to 1997, called a second congressional seat “essential.”

With House members limited to sitting on two committees, another for Montana could double the state’s impact in promoting legislation important to Montana, Williams said.

When Williams was first elected to the House, the state had two representatives. After the 1990 census, the state lost its second seat. Montana’s lone representative has typically served on the agriculture and natural resources committees — critical areas to the state.

“But Montana has more interests than agriculture and national parks,”

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Bathroom Care Tips For A Spotless Finish

These bathroom care tips were created to help you keep your bathroom looking cleaner without too much effort. The bathroom is an important area in your home; It's one of the ways you make an impression on your guests. This can put a lot of pressure on you to maintain a spotless bathroom. Of course, you keep it "hygienic" all the time, but "spotless" isn't always possible. Rust stains, soap scum, and dirty grout prevent some people from attaining the "spotless" achievement.

If a bathroom that looks like new every time is what you're aiming for, these bathroom care tips are for you. Once you get the initial bathroom overhaul, something I like to call the master cleaning session, out of the way, keeping it up should be a breeze. Let me just remind you that keeping any area of ​​your home spotless takes regular maintenance. With that said, we'll break this down into two parts: the "master bathroom care tips" to take your bathroom from dingy to spectacular, and the "everyday bathroom care tips" to keep your bathroom cleaner on a regular basis.

Master Bathroom Care Tips:

  • This is not the time to shy away from powerful products or professional services. If you're dealing with overwhelming grime, rust, and build up it's okay to use bleach to cut through months or years of neglect.
  • If you're using harsh chemicals, always make sure you have enough ventilation to prevent inhaling them. Don't underestimate the fumes.
  • If there are certain spots that are particularly dirty, apply treatments and bathroom cleaning products to those areas first. Let the products penetrate while you take on other areas.
  • Use steel wool or a scrubber with extra-firm bristles to scrub – always using gloves!
  • For tubs and sinks that need special attention, fill up the sink with the hottest water possible and add either bleach or other powerful detergent known for removing stains.

Everyday Bathroom Care Tips:

  • Once the bathroom is in better condition, you can start using more gentle bathroom cleaning products for your everyday routine.
  • Make use of storage to keep clutter at bay. This will make wiping down surfaces much easier.
  • If you don't have a way to ventilate air in your bathroom, it can encourage mold and take longer for your towels to dry. Give your bathroom a hand and leave the door open to allow any moisture to exit.
  • Keep a scrubber in the shower so you can take care of any stains while you're in there. One less stain to worry about come cleaning day
  • Speaking of cleaning day, dedicate one day out of the week to clean your bathroom. You can either use that day to clean all of your main rooms or just one room at a time.
  • Take one day out of the month to do regular deep cleaning on your rooms. This means applying a grout cleaner to your tiles, disinfecting your toilet bowl and bathroom floors, etc.

The Grout Cleaner Dilemma
Having a good …

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