‘It’s his house’: Nadal vs. Djokovic in French Open final

Go all the way back to June 8, 2006, when Rafael Nadal moved on at the French Open after his 19-year-old, 63rd-ranked opponent in the quarterfinals quit because of a bad back while trailing two sets to none.

That opponent’s assessment of Nadal after facing him for the first time as pros: “He’s the best on this surface, but he’s not unbeatable. That’s for sure.”

Hmmmm.

That foe? Novak Djokovic. Fast-forward to the final at Roland Garros on Sunday, when No. 1 Djokovic and No. 2 Nadal will stand across from each other once again at Court Philippe Chatrier, only this time in October after the tournament was postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

It will be their 56th tour-level meeting – more than any other pair of men in the Open era, which dates to 1968.

And let’s not forget the big picture: This match carries significant weight in the Grand Slam standings that so many fans, and the players themselves, keep tabs on.

Roger Federer, who is 39 and missed most of this season after having two knee operations, owns the men’s record of 20 major championships. Nadal, who is 34, is next among men with 19; Djokovic, 33, stands third with 17.

After Sunday, either Nadal will pull even with Federer for the first time since they were tied with zero apiece, or Djokovic will gain on the leading duo and the totals will read 20-19-18.

For now, this is how each has filled his trophy cabinet:

– Djokovic: 8 at the Australian Open, 5 at Wimbledon, 3 at the U.S. Open, 1 at the French Open;

– Nadal: 12 at the French Open, 4 at the U.S. Open, 2 at Wimbledon, 1 at the Australian Open;

– Federer: 8 at Wimbledon, 6 at the Australian Open, 5 at the U.S. Open, 1 at the French Open.

All three are greats of the game, regardless of where the numbers end up, of course.

Still, as much as Nadal wouldn’t engage in a discussion about his chance to catch Federer after beating Diego Schwartzman 6-3, 6-3, 7-6 (0) in the semifinals Friday, he did acknowledge that “it’s good for tennis” if others talk about it.

Rest assured, they will.

Much in the way that for years, people will debate which of the Big Three duos had the most intriguing head-to-head matchup: Federer vs. Nadal, Djokovic vs. Federer, or Nadal vs. Djokovic.

“He’s definitely my greatest rival,” Djokovic said about Nadal on Friday after getting past Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-3, 6-2, 5-7, 4-6, 6-1 in the semifinals. “Playing him in so many great matches, of course the past will have some effect, in terms of respect towards each other, I guess — motivation to get out on the court and play your best, knowing that we both have to be at our best in order to win against each other.”

Nadal called Djokovic, who is 37-1 in 2020, the lone loss via disqualification at the U.S. Open last month, “one

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PIPPIN Announces Third and Final Extension at The Garden Theatre

PIPPIN will now run through Saturday 17 October.

PIPPIN Announces Third and Final Extension at The Garden Theatre

There’s more magic to do… critically acclaimed ‘Pippin’ has announced a final week’s extension at London’s exciting new outdoor theatre venue, The Garden Theatre.

‘Pippin’, which has received 4 Off West End Award nominations – Best Musical Production (Steven Dexter), Best Ensemble, Choreography (Nick Winston) and Musical Director (MIchael Bradley) – will now end its run on Saturday 17 October.

Producer Peter Bull, Lambco Productions and The Garden Theatre at The Eagle in Vauxhall have also received the first OneOFF Award from the Off West End Awards, celebrating the creation of a new venue against the odds and launching with the first Off West End production since lockdown began in March 2020.

The press night for ‘Naked Boys Singing’, that launches the new Eagle Late slot, will move a week to Friday 16 October at 8.30pm to comply with the new 10pm Covid curfew.

“Producer Peter Bull said: “Lyn Gardner asked in her review of ‘Pippin’ ‘what kind of mad optimist and dreamer opens a theatre venue during a pandemic?’. Well, we did and the success of The Garden Theatre has exceeded all our expectations. We have now installed outdoor heating and a new sound system and created 3 dressing rooms within the venue as we prepare to announce a slew of productions taking us into 2021.”

Eagle owner Mark Oakley said: “Wow! 4 Offie nominations and the OneOFF award – I am absolutely chuffed for our theatre production company and all involved who have created something totally unique and a lifeline to my business. If The Garden Theatre had not happened The Eagle would not have survived. But as we celebrated this incredible new attraction for all to enjoy, we received the bitter 10pm curfew blow. However, the show will go on…”

The ‘Pippin’ cast features Ryan Anderson, Tsemaye Bob-Egbe, Tanisha-Mae Brown, Joanne Clifton, Harry Francis and Dan Krikler. Creative team: Director Steven Dexter, Choreographer Nick Winston, Musical Director Michael Bradley, Designer David Shields, Lighting Designer Richard Lambert, Casting by Anne Vosser. It is produced by Peter Bull for LAMBCO Productions.

Originally Produced on the Broadway stage by Stuart Ostrow Directed on the Broadway stage by Bob Fosse. 2013 Broadway revival directed by Diane Paulus. Theo ending originally conceived in 1998 by Mitch Sebastian. Performed by arrangement with Music Theatre International (Europe) Limited.

INFORMATION

Peter Bull for LAMBCO Productions
presents

‘Pippin’

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz
Book by Roger O. Hirson
Directed by Steven Dexter

The Garden Theatrea
at The Eagle
349 Kennington Lane
London SE11 5QY
(nearest tube/train: Vauxhall)

Now booking to Sunday 17 October

Doors will open 30mins before the performance

Tickets:£20.00 + bkng fee

Bookings/website:
www.gardentheatre.co.uk

The performance is 90mins with a 5 min pause

The Garden Theatre at The Eagle
follows Government guidelines in its operations

Social Distancing is in place with seat allocations by the theatre staff

The venue is outdoors

Please order drinks for before the show and interval drinks immediately upon arrival and

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House committee final report says Boeing, FAA failures to blame for deadly 737 MAX crashes

Paul Njoroge lost his entire family in March 2019, after Ethiopian Air Flight 302 crashed shortly after takeoff in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“I stay up nights thinking of the horror they must have endured,” Njoroge told lawmakers in a hearing on the incident last summer.

His mother-in-law, wife and three young children were flying on a Boeing 737 MAX and were victims of the second fatal accident involving the aircraft. Just months earlier, Lion Air 610, also a MAX, crashed into the Java Sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta, Indonesia. Both crashes resulted in the deaths of 346 people.

“As the pilots struggled to keep the plane flying for six minutes, the terror that my wife must have experienced with little Rubi on her lap, our two young children beside her crying for daddy, and my mother-in-law feeling helpless beside her,” Njoroge said. “The six minutes will forever be embedded in my mind.”

PHOTO: Debris lays piled up just outside the impact crater at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, March 11, 2019.

Debris lays piled up just outside the impact crater at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, March 11, 2019.

Debris lays piled up just outside the impact crater at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, March 11, 2019.

Days after the crash in Ethiopia, the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure launched its investigation into the design, development and certification of the MAX family of aircraft and what exactly led to the two fatal crashes. On Wednesday, almost a year and a half later, lawmakers released a scathing report which concluded technical design flaws, faulty assumptions about pilot responses and management failures by both Boeing and the FAA led to the collisions.

The findings, released Wednesday by Democrats on the committee, come as civil aviation authorities and airline flight crews from the U.S., Canada, Brazil, and the E.U. meet in London this week to review Boeing’s proposed training for 737 Max flight crews. This marks a significant milestone in the eventual ungrounding of the plane that has been modified for over a year.

“Boeing has now acknowledged some of these issues through its actions,” the report states. “Unfortunately, Boeing’s responses to safety issues raised in the 737 MAX program have consistently been too late.”

What happened?

Investigators found that both crashes were tied to a software called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS). MCAS was designed to help stabilize the 737 MAX after heavier, re-positioned engines placed on the aircraft caused the plane’s nose to point too far upwards in certain circumstances.

In both crashes, incorrect data from a faulty sensor caused MCAS to misfire, forcing the plane to nose down repeatedly, even as pilots struggled to regain control and gain altitude. MCAS was not mentioned in the pilot manual.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) found that the pilots in both crashes were bombarded with multiple alarms and alerts in the cockpit before the planes crashed. The blaring alarms likely caused further confusion and made an already stressful situation worse, according to the NTSB.

PHOTO: House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-OR) delivers opening remarks during a hearing about the Boeing 737 MAX airplane on Capitol Hill, May 15, 2019.

House Transportation

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Trump, Biden Trade Blows As White House Race Hits Final Stretch

Donald Trump and his Democratic rival Joe Biden traded tough blows Monday as the White House race entered its final stretch, with the Republican leader branding his opponent “stupid” — and the Democrat firing back that the president lacked the “guts” to tackle the Covid-19 pandemic.

As Biden and his running mate Kamala Harris took their campaign message to must-win swing states Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, the president convened a surprise news conference at the White House.

In a freewheeling and grievance-laden performance, Trump once more teased the possibility of a Covid-19 inoculation by Election Day — something experts say remains unlikely — and accused his opponents of playing politics with a vaccine after Harris said she would not take his word alone on its safety.

US President Donald Trump speaks after stepping off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on September 3, 2020 US President Donald Trump speaks after stepping off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on September 3, 2020 Photo: AFP / MANDEL NGAN

Touting an upswing in job creation — after tens of millions lost jobs — and claiming the US is turning the corner on the pandemic, he called Biden “stupid,” saying he “wants to surrender our country to the virus, he wants to surrender our families to the violent left-wing mob, and he wants to surrender our jobs to China.”

Labor Day traditionally kicks off the final sprint of the campaign, with less than two months until the November 3 election — but the rival campaigns have been knocked off stride by multiple layers of turmoil, from the pandemic to the struggling US economy to deep racial unrest.

Candidates who normally would be skipping daily from state to state to speak before big crowds are limiting their movements and doing much more virtually.

And the sometimes violent anti-racism protests and counter-protests — the latest a pro-Trump motorcade rumbling Monday on the outskirts of Portland — lend an explosive element to the campaign.

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden headed to Pennsylvania as Labor Day kicks off the final stretch of the White House race Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden headed to Pennsylvania as Labor Day kicks off the final stretch of the White House race Photo: AFP / JIM WATSON

Biden headed Monday to the swing state of Pennsylvania, where he held a socially-distant meeting with union leaders before taking questions from members of the huge AFL-CIO union at its headquarters.

Addressing the event, he hit back at Trump, charging that “he didn’t have the guts to take on Covid.”

“We know he’s been great for his rich friends, but he hasn’t been so great for the rest of us,” charged Biden, who went on to assail Trump over a report in The Atlantic magazine that he has disparaged the military and its veterans.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrives at Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport on September 7, 2020 Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrives at Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport on September 7, 2020 Photo: AFP / Kerem Yucel

“He’s downright un-American,” Biden fumed.

Though Trump has dismissed the report as a “hoax,” it appears to have hit a nerve following a poll showing his support below that for Biden among active duty personnel.

“I’m not saying the military (leadership) is in love with me

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