Atlanta activist spent $200G in Black Lives Matter donations on house, personal expenses: FBI

The FBI has arrested the founder of a Black Lives Matter group in Atlanta on fraud and money laundering charges.

Atlanta activist spent $200G in Black Lives Matter donations on house, personal expenses: FBI

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Sir Maejor Page, 32, was accused Friday of misappropriating $200,000 in donations he solicited through Facebook on behalf of Black Lives Matter of Greater Atlanta, Fox 5 Atlanta reported Friday.

Page was released on bond after appearing before a judge via video. He did not immediately return messages Saturday from Fox News.

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The FBI opened an investigation last year after a cooperating witness submitted a fraud complaint against Page, whose real name is Tyree Conyers-Page, FBI agent Matthew Desorbo said in the complaint.

Page founded Black Lives Matter of Greater Atlanta in 2016 and this year took in more than $466,000 in donations in June, July and August, Desorbo said.

“In sum, Page has spent over $200,000 on personal items generated from

donations received through BLMGA Facebook page with no identifiable purchase or expenditure

for social or racial justice,” he said.

The FBI said Page pledged to use those donations “for George Floyd” but instead used the money make purchases related to food, dining, entertainment, clothing, furniture, a home security system, tailored suits and accessories.

According to the bureau, Page also used $112,000 of the donated money to purchase a house for himself in Toledo, Ohio. The transaction took place last month.

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White House slams FBI chief Wray over voter fraud testimony

By Doina Chiacu



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – FBI Director Christopher Wray faced criticism from the White House for the second time in a week on Friday when President Donald Trump’s chief of staff questioned his ability to detect voter fraud as the November election draws near.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort,” undercutting the Republican president’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting before his Nov. 3 contest against Democrat Joe Biden.

Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, denigrated Wray during an interview with CBS “This Morning.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” he said without elaborating.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI were investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Meadows suggested to CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI had no comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Last week, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

That prompted Trump to retort, “I did not like his answers yesterday.”

Wray’s statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, an established method of voting in the United States.

He also continues to bristle at U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Cynthia Osterman)

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White House again criticizes FBI director for voting remarks

FBI Director Christopher Wray was the target of White House criticism for the second time in a week Friday as Chief of Staff Mark Meadows criticized remarks he made a day earlier to Congress about voter fraud

WASHINGTON — FBI Director Christopher Wray was the target of White House criticism for the second time in a week Friday as Chief of Staff Mark Meadows chided him over remarks made a day earlier to Congress about voter fraud.

Meadows suggested in an interview with CBS that Wray was ill-informed when he told the Senate that there has not been any significant coordinated national voter fraud.

Meadows was critical in his CBS interview of the director, tying his remarks on voter fraud to a probe of the FBI’s handling of Russian links to the Trump campaign. The president and his allies have denounced the investigation, which a watchdog has said was flawed but legitimate overall.

“Well, with all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding e-mails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there is any kind of voter fraud.”

He then suggested that Wray needed more information about the allegations of voter fraud that have surfaced in several places.

“Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill,” Meadows said.

It was unusually pointed criticism of an FBI director, especially one who was appointed by Trump.

In his testimony to the Senate Homeland Security committee on Thursday, Wray said the FBI takes “all election-related threats seriously,” including voter fraud or voter suppression.

But in response to a question from Michigan Sen. Gary Peters, the FBI director said the agency has not seen evidence of widespread voter fraud, at least not to date.

“Now, we have not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it’s by mail or otherwise,” he said. “We have seen voter fraud at the local level from time to time.”

It was the kind of nuanced answer that riled Trump last week when Wray was asked at a House hearing by lawmakers

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White House chief of staff Mark Meadows contradicts FBI Director Christopher Wray on voter fraud

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows disputed FBI Director Christopher Wray’s testimony to Congress on Thursday that there’s no evidence of voter fraud by mail or otherwise, and he suggested that Wray “needs to get involved on the ground.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there is any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said in an interview with “CBS This Morning” on Friday. Wray had told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that there was no evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort.”

Meadows also made reference to a Washington Post report about 500 “problematic” ballots that had been sent to some voters in North Carolina, although this was the result of a clerical error, and not voter fraud. Moreover, people can still only vote once, meaning that even if they sent in two ballots, their vote would only be counted once. Earlier this month, President Trump urged North Carolinians to vote twice, which is a felony.

“Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill,” Meadows said of Wray.

In a separate gaggle with reporters on Friday morning, Meadows also sidestepped a question from CBS News’ Ben Tracy about whether the president still had confidence in Wray.

“It’s time for Director Wray to quit, in my mind, playing footsie with transparency and delivery those documents,” Meadows said, which may have been a reference to material sought by Congress about Crossfire Hurricane, the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation into any links between 2016 Trump campaign associates and Russian meddling in the election. On Thursday, newly released records from the Justice Department first reported by CBS News showed that the primary sub-source for the Steele dossier had been the subject of an earlier counterintelligence investigation by the FBI.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly tried to sow doubts about the legitimacy of mail-in ballots, baselessly claiming that it leads to widespread voter fraud. However, the president has encouraged mail-in voting in Florida, a key swing state that is considered to be critical to his reelection.

The president has also refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power should Joe Biden win the presidential election, saying only that “we’re going to have to see what happens.” On Thursday, he told reporters, “We want to make sure the election is honest and I’m not sure that it can be.” 

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White House Slams FBI Chief Wray Over Voter Fraud Testimony | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Friday denigrated FBI Director Christopher Wray’s ability to detect voter fraud in the U.S. election and suggested that if he “drill down” more he would change his congressional testimony on the issue.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a coordinated national voter fraud effort, undercutting President Donald Trump’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting as a threat to election security.

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said on CBS “This Morning.” It was not clear what missing emails he was referring to.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI was investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Earlier in the day, Wray told the Senate Homeland Security Committee that, “We have not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it’s by mail or otherwise. We have seen voter fraud at the local level from time to time.”

Meadows suggested on CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Earlier this month, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

Both statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, a long established method of voting in the United States.

The Republican president has long bristled at that U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost now-Trump’s 2016 campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Trump repeatedly referenced Clinton’s “missing emails” during that campaign, mockingly asking Russia to help find them. A State Department investigation of Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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State Rep. Dave Greenspan is unnamed representative who spoke with the FBI about House Bill 6, records show

COLUMBUS, Ohio – State Rep. Dave Greenspan is the unnamed Ohio lawmaker who federal charging documents dramatically depict as meeting with agents in the FBI’s public-corruption unit while he received a text from former House Speaker Larry Householder pressuring him to vote for House Bill 6, according to newly released public records.

The records show Greenspan, a Westlake Republican, received a text from Householder on May 28, 2019, matching the one depicted in the 82-page criminal complaint that was unsealed following Householder’s arrest in July. In the text, Householder tells Greenspan, “I really need you to vote yes on HB6, it means a lot to me. Can I count on you?”

At that moment, Greenspan was sitting in a meeting with FBI agents. Meanwhile, the House was debating whether to pass House Bill 6, which will send more than $1 billion to two nuclear plants formerly owned by FirstEnergy. Prosecutors allege Householder and his allies passed the bill in exchange for $60 million in bribes from FirstEnergy and others, given in the form of political spending that helped elect Householder to his legislative leadership position and that helped force the bill through the legislature and defend it against a repeal effort.

After Greenspan responded no, Householder replied: “I just want you to remember – when I needed you – you weren’t there. twice.” An unnamed intermediary later approached Greenspan, identified in the complaint only as “Representative 7,” asking him to delete the texts on behalf of Jeff Longstreth, a top Householder political aide who also was arrested and charged in connection with HB6.

Greenspan showed the text message to FBI agents immediately after he received it, according to the federal charging document. He later provided screen shots to the FBI.

The House passed the bill on May 29, the day after Greenspan met with the FBI.

Greenspan Householder texts

A screenshot of the text message exchange between former House Speaker Larry Householder and state Rep. Dave Greenspan that recently appeared in a federal corruption indictment following Householder’s arrest.

The charging document also says that Neil Clark, a prominent Columbus lobbyist who was arrested the same day Householder was, told Greenspan separate legislation he was sponsoring would not advance unless he voted for House Bill 6. When Greenspan tried to explain to Clark why he couldn’t support the bill, Clark responded: “No one cares about your opinion.”

Householder has pleaded not guilty to a federal racketeering charge, which carries a penalty of up to 20 years in prison, and denied wrongdoing. He was removed as speaker following his arrest, but remains in the state legislature. Clark and Longstreth also have pleaded not guilty, as have two others arrested in connection to the probe, lobbyists Matt Borges and Juan Cespedes.

In a statement, U.S. Attorney David M. DeVillers, who’s overseeing the case, said: “When confronted with wrongdoing, those who come forward and assist law enforcement demonstrate bravery and courage. We owe such individuals our deepest admiration and gratitude.”

The identity of “Representative 7” was a

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House Republicans urge FBI to investigate funding behind recent riots

EXCLUSIVE: A number of House Republicans are urging the FBI to investigate who has been funding the recent riots across the country and bring federal charges against those who they say are “aiding and abetting” criminal activity.

“The Department of Justice and FBI’s leadership is needed to bring to justice those who have funded these criminal organizations and to give justice to the communities who have been devastated by these individuals and organizations,” reads the letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray, signed by Rep. Andy Biggs., R-Ariz., along with nearly two dozen other Republicans.

DOJ IDENTIFIES NYC, OTHER CITIES AS JURISDICTIONS PERMITTING ‘ANARCHY, VIOLENCE AND DESTRUCTION’  

Riots tore through a number of cities across the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd in police custody in May. Against the backdrop of peaceful protests, the riots caused significant damage and injuries in cities like New York City, Chicago and Portland, Ore.

Republicans have zeroed in on the left-wing organizations behind the violence, such as Antifa. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, held a hearing last month into Antifa’s role in the riots, while in the House, Biggs has taken a number of measures to probe who is funding the violence.

KEN BUCK SENDS LETTER TO DOJ ASKING FOR INVESTIGATION INTO FUNDING OF RECENT RIOTS

“Many cities across our country have been rocked by rioters associated with Antifa and other organizations,” the letter says. “These individuals seem to be using cowardly efforts to commandeer otherwise peaceful protests. These actions constitute domestic terrorism and federal charges must be brought against those who are aiding and abetting the criminal actions of these organizations.”

Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., who signed the letter, also sent a letter to the Department of Justice last week, asking it to look into the source of funding for recent riots and Antifa-related activities.

Other representatives who signed the letter, which urges the FBI to act “expeditiously,” include Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., Doug Collins, R-Ga., and Rep. Debbie Lesko, R-Ariz. It notes that Attorney General William Barr has said that Antifa and other extremist groups “have been involved in instigating and participating in the violent activity.”

The letter comes days after an estimate that the summer riots will be the costliest in insurance history – between $1 billion and $2 billion.

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On Monday, the DOJ identified New York City, Portland and Seattle as “local governments that are permitting anarchy, violence, and destruction in American cities.”

President Trump had targeted the cities, asking for a review of federal funding to “anarchist” jurisdictions. The DOJ memo serves as notice that New York City, Portland and Seattle meet the criteria Trump set out for potential defunding.

Fox News’ Morgan Phillips and Tyler Olson contributed to this report.

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