Trump Resumes Public Events With Mini-Rally on White House Lawn

(Bloomberg) —

President Donald Trump made his first public appearance on Saturday since returning from a three-day coronavirus hospitalization, telling supporters at the White House that “through the power of American science and medicine, we will eradicate the China Virus once and for all.”

“I want to thank you all for the prayers,” Trump said from a White House balcony at hundreds of invited guests at a campaign-style event on the South Lawn. Trump arrived wearing a mask and removed it before speaking.

Trump’s comments touched on several of his usual stump-speech topics, including suggestions of voter fraud. The remarks ran for about 18 minutes, much shorter than Trump’s typical freewheeling campaign speeches.

The appearance was designed to show the president — who declared he’s “feeling great” — has recovered from Covid-19 and is ready to resume work and his race against Democratic nominee Joe Biden. But the president appeared without certification from his doctors that he’s no longer contagious with the deadly virus, and despite the White House not releasing a formal update on his recovery since Thursday.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: President Trump Delivers Address On Law And Order At White House


© Bloomberg
President Trump Delivers Address On Law And Order At White House

U.S. President Donald Trump gestures while arriving to speak from the Truman Balcony of the White House on Oct. 10.

Photographer: Erin Scott/Bloomberg

Still, the president sat for at least three hours of radio and remote television interviews with conservative media personalities on Friday, and is expected to resume a heavy campaign travel schedule this week with rallies in Florida, Pennsylvania and Iowa. Trump has been itching to return to public events following his battle with the coronavirus, aides say — an impatience only heightened by the president falling further behind Biden in polls.

Saturday’s event risked deepening concern among voters about Trump’s handling of a pandemic that has left more than two dozen of his close associates infected and more than 210,000 Americans dead.

After the president’s last outdoor event — a Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to announce his pick of Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court — at least 11 attendees tested positive for coronavirus. While the White House had a testing regime in place to screen for virus cases, few guests wore masks and attendees mingled and sat in close proximity to one another both indoors and outdoors.

Trump’s physician said Wednesday that the president had been free of symptoms for the previous 24 hours. White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Trump “will be clear to go” on Saturday, when “he wants to talk to the American people.” There are medical tests underway to ensure he doesn’t transmit the virus when he returns to the campaign trail, she said on Fox News, adding that she’d conferred with White House doctor Sean Conley. McEnany, who herself has tested positive for Covid-19, is working remotely.

Virus Screening

On Saturday, White House guests were required to bring masks with them and wear them on the grounds, a person familiar with the matter said, adding

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Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


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Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.

But after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away, the president is seizing an opportunity to try to reposition himself in the race, despite the apparent health risk to attendees from a man likely to still be contagious.

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In a Friday night interview on Fox News, Trump, who was given a cocktail of antiviral drugs and strong steroids during his hospital stay, insisted he was “medication-free”.

“We pretty much finished, and now we’ll see how things go. But pretty much nothing,” Trump said when Fox medical analyst Dr Marc Siegel asked the president what medications he was still taking.

Earlier in the day, Dr Sean Conley, Trump’s personal physician, issued a letter clearing the president to return to in-person campaign events, but omitting any medical justification, including crucial information about any negative coronavirus tests.

In the Friday interview, Trump said he had been tested, but gave a vague answer about it. “I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet,” he said. “But I’ve been retested and I know I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free.”

Trump’s speech today at the White House South Lawn will address “law and order” and protests around the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd and racial issues, sources revealed on Friday.

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Trump to Resume Public Events Starting Saturday at White House

(Bloomberg) —

President Donald Trump will make his first public appearance since returning from a three-day hospitalization for Covid-19, setting the stage for a return to the campaign trail even as questions remain about whether he’s still contagious.

In a Saturday address from a White House balcony before hundreds of invited guests, Trump will seek to show that he has made a strong recovery from coronavirus and is ready to resume work and re-enter the re-election race against Democratic nominee and front-runner Joe Biden.

The event kicks off what could be a full week of campaign travel for the president, starting Monday with a stop in central Florida for a rally at the Orlando Sanford International Airport to make up for one canceled when Trump fell ill.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump Arrives Back At White House After Stay At Walter Reed Medical Center For Covid


© Photographer: Win McNamee/Getty Images North America
President Trump Arrives Back At White House After Stay At Walter Reed Medical Center For Covid

Donald Trump stands on the Truman Balcony on Oct. 5.

Photographer: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Trump has been itching to return to public events following his battle with the coronavirus, aides say — an impatience only heightened by the president falling further behind Biden in polls.

The White House event comes at the earliest moment doctors said the president would be able to return to public life. The gathering risks deepening concern among voters about Trump’s handling of a pandemic that has left more than two dozen of his close associates infected and more than 210,000 Americans dead.

After the president’s last outdoor event — a Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony to announce his pick of Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court — at least 11 attendees tested positive for coronavirus. While the White House had a testing regime in place to screen for virus cases, few guests wore masks and attendees mingled and sat in close proximity to one another both indoors and outdoors.

Trump’s physician said Wednesday that the president had been free of symptoms for the previous 24 hours. White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Trump “will be clear to go” on Saturday, when “he wants to talk to the American people.” There are medical tests underway to ensure he doesn’t transmit the virus when he returns to the campaign trail, she said on Fox News, adding that she’d conferred with White House doctor Sean Conley. McEnany, who herself has tested positive for Covid-19, is working remotely.

Virus Screening

On Saturday, White House guests must bring masks with them and wear them on the grounds, a person familiar with the matter said, adding that they also have to undergo a Covid-19 screening on Saturday morning that will include a temperature check and a brief questionnaire. But those rules were put in place not by the White House but by the organizer of the event, the Blexit group, led by Candace Owens, a Trump ally, the person said.

Video: Mike Pence Attends 2 Superspreader Events Ahead of Debate (Inside Edition)

Mike Pence Attends 2 Superspreader Events

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Trump restarting campaign with White House, Florida events

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking to shove his campaign back on track, President Donald Trump and his team laid out an aggressive return to political activities, including a big White House event on Saturday and a rally in Florida on Monday, a week after his hospitalization for a virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

As questions linger about his health — and Democratic opponent Joe Biden steps up his own campaigning — Trump planned to leave the Washington area for the first time since he was hospitalized. He is also increasing his radio and TV appearances with conservative interviewers, hoping to make up for lost time with just over three weeks until Election Day and millions already voting.

The president has not been seen in public — other than in White House-produced videos — since his return days ago from the military hospital where he received experimental treatments for the coronavirus.

Two weeks after his Rose Garden event that has been labeled a “superspreader” for the virus, Trump is planning to convene another large crowd outside the White House on Saturday for what his administration calls “a peaceful protest for law & order.” More than two dozen people linked to the White House have contracted COVID-19 since the president’s Sept. 26 event announcing Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court.

Trump will address the Saturday group, expected to be at least several hundred supporters, from the White House balcony. All attendees are required to bring masks or will be provided with them, and also will be given temperature checks and asked to fill out a brief questionnaire. Attendees will be strongly encouraged to follow CDC guidelines, which include mask-wearing and social distancing.

Trump’s Monday rally in Sanford, Florida, was originally scheduled to be held on Oct. 2, the day after he tested positive.


Announcement of the new event came as Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious-disease expert, cautioned the White House again to avoid large-scale gatherings of people without masks.

He said of the Barrett event in an interview with The Associated Press, “I was not surprised to see a superspreader event given the circumstances.” That means “crowded, congregate setting, not wearing masks. It is not surprising to see an outbreak,” he said.

District of Columbia virus restrictions prohibit outdoor gatherings larger than 50 people, although that rule has not been strictly enforced. Masks are mandatory outdoors for most people, but the regulations don’t apply on federal land, and the Trump White House has openly flouted them for months.

And next week in Florida? Trump tweeted on Friday that he would be in Sanford “for a very BIG RALLY!”

Meanwhile, next Thursday’s town hall-style Trump-Biden debate was officially canceled, a few days after Trump backed away when the sponsoring commission switched it from face-to-face to virtual following Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis.

Trump said the Commission on Presidential Debates was protecting Biden from having to take on the president in person. But Biden’s team said the

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Trump Should Be Able to Resume Public Events Saturday, Doctor Says

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump says he feels well and hopes to hold a rally on Saturday. Trump should be able to resume public events that day, his doctor said. District of Columbia health authorities urged people who attended the Rose Garden ceremony announcing Trump’s Supreme Court nominee to get tested for the coronavirus.



a man wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump gestures outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020.


© Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020.

Trump returned to the Oval Office Wednesday for the first time since getting back to the White House Monday evening after his hospitalization at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. He said on Thursday in his first live interview since returning home that his drugs have been dialed down, and that he’s taking a steroid that isn’t “heavy.”

Key Developments:

Trump Calls Case a ‘Blessing From God,’ Hails Antibody TreatmentOne Week at the White House Was America’s Pandemic in MicrocosmTrump’s Covid Treatments and What the Options Are: QuickTakeResults of Covid-19 Tests for U.S. Politicians, Officials: List

Trump Says He Hopes to Do a Rally on Saturday

President Donald Trump said he was feeling “really good” after his bout with Covid-19 and was planning a rally on Saturday.

“I think I’m going to try doing a rally on Saturday night. If we can, if we have enough time to put it together,” he told Sean Hannity of Fox News in a telephone interview on Thursday night.

“But we want to do a rally in Florida, probably in Florida on Saturday night,” he said. “Might come back and do one in Pennsylvania on the following night.”

Earlier Thursday, Trump’s physician, Sean Conley, said in a memorandum released by the White House that Trump probably could resume public events by Saturday.

The interview with Hannity took place a week after their last exchange, which occurred hours before Trump said he had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Trump May Resume Public Events on Saturday, Doctor Says (8:05 p.m.)

President Donald Trump’s physician says that he can probably “safely return to public engagements” on Saturday.

The physician, Sean Conley, said in a memorandum released Thursday night that Trump had completed his course of therapy for Covid-19 and “had responded extremely well to treatment.” An examination showed that Trump had “remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness,” Conley said.

Conley said Saturday marks “day 10” since the president’s Covid-19 diagnosis and based on “the trajectory of the advanced diagnostics” he should be able to resume public events then.

Conley had said earlier this week that the president’s illness could still take a turn. “We all remain cautiously optimistic and on guard because we’re in a bit of uncharted territory when it comes to a patient that received the therapies he has so early in the course,” he said.

“We’re looking to this weekend,” Conley added. “If we can get through to Monday with him remaining the same or improving, better yet, then

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Coronavirus live news: doctor clears Trump to return to public events on Saturday; record global case rise | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

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What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

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Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

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Trump has completed COVID-19 therapies, can do public events Saturday

By Jeff Mason and Steve Holland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump’s physician said on Thursday that Trump had completed his course of therapy for the novel coronavirus, had remained stable since returning to the White House and could resume public engagements on Saturday.

Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo released by the White House that Trump had responded “extremely well” to treatment without any evidence of adverse effects.

Trump was hospitalized on Friday after he announced he had contracted the coronavirus. He returned to the White House on Monday.

“Since returning home, his physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness,” Conley wrote. “Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements at that time.”

Trump, confined to the White House with the illness that he has sought to play down, has been itching to return to the campaign trail as he trails Democratic candidate Joe Biden in national polls ahead of the Nov. 3 election.

The president has been criticized both for his administration’s handling of the pandemic and for his response to his own diagnosis.

Earlier on Thursday Trump said did not believe he was contagious and was feeling good enough to resume campaign rallies.

Trump has held such rallies indoors and outdoors with thousands of people, many of whom do not wear masks, against the advice of public health professionals.

“I’d love to do a rally tonight. I wanted to do one last night,” Trump told Fox Business Network, adding that “if I’m at a rally, I stand by myself very far away from everybody.”

The White House has declined to say when Trump last tested negative test for the virus.

The president’s positive test sidelined him from in-person events that have been the lifeblood of his campaign.

Trump pulled out of a second debate with Biden after the Commission on Presidential Debates announced that the Oct. 15 event would be held in a virtual format, with the candidates in separate locations, to ensure it could go forward whether or not Trump remained virus-free.

“I’m feeling good, really good,” Trump said in the Fox interview. Trump said he had stopped taking “most therapeutics” for the virus but was still on steroids.

With layoffs in key sectors increasing doubts about the fragile economic recovery, Trump said he called off negotiations with Congress for a fresh round of stimulus for the ailing economy because they were not going anywhere.

But he said some discussions are ongoing with Democrats about boosting support for U.S. airlines and providing Americans with $1,200 stimulus checks.

Trump has faced criticism for underestimating the novel coronavirus, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans and thrown millions out of work. Even since revealing his own illness on Friday, Trump has played down the respiratory disease’s dangers and been censured by social media platforms

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White House doctor says Trump safe to return to public events on Saturday

White House physician Sean Conley said Thursday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the vice presidential debate Harris accuses Trump of promoting voter suppression Pence targets Biden over ISIS hostages, brings family of executed aid worker to debate MORE would be able to make a “safe return” to public events on Saturday, less than two weeks after being diagnosed with the novel coronavirus. 

Conley issued a memo Thursday evening stating that Trump had completed his therapy for COVID-19 and that he has responded “extremely well” to treatment overall. The update came just three days after Trump returned to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he received treatment for 72 hours.

“Since returning home, his physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness. Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote.

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” he continued.

Conley also said that, as of Thursday afternoon, Trump’s heart rate was 69 beats per minute, his blood pressure 127/81 mmHg, his respiratory rate 15-17 breaths per minute and his pulse oximetry showed a blood oxygen level of 96-98 percent with room air.

Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus one week ago, and he experienced a high fever and two drops in his oxygen level after his diagnosis.

Trump was given the antiviral medication remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone and an experimental antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron in the course of his treatment. He was also given supplemental oxygen twice — once Friday and again on Saturday — according to his medical team.

Trump has been eager to get back to work since returning to the White House Monday evening. He worked from the Oval Office on Wednesday and Thursday despite likely still being infectious, and has filmed videos touting the drugs with which he was treated.

In a video posted to his Twitter account on Wednesday, Trump described the Regeneron cocktail as a “cure.”

Trump indicated in a Fox Business interview Thursday morning that he wants to return to the campaign trail, and Conley’s memo seems to give him the clearance to do so as soon as Saturday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that patients self-isolate for at least 10 days after experiencing symptoms from the coronavirus.

Conley, who has not briefed the press on Trump’s condition since Monday, has been regularly issuing brief updates about his condition.

He has been evasive on specific questions about the president’s condition and illness, including dodging questions about what scans showed about the health of the president’s lungs and the date of Trump’s last negative COVID-19 test.

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How Did His Inner Circle Get Infected? Rose Garden, Golf Club Events Scrutinized

A White House ceremony last Saturday for Amy Coney Barrett brought together top aides, Cabinet members and Republican lawmakers. And New Jersey health officials have contacted more than 200 people who attended a campaign fundraiser at Trump National Golf Course in Bedminster on Thursday.


CNN:
Senior Administration Official: Coronavirus Outbreak Likely Began At Supreme Court Announcement 


A senior administration official told CNN’s Jake Tapper on Saturday that the cluster of coronavirus cases among top Republican officials likely began at President Donald Trump’s Rose Garden event announcing the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The official said it “seems highly likely this (outbreak) originated at the SCOTUS announcement last week. It may have come from the Hill. The next major concern will be securing Capitol Hill and protecting lawmakers.” (Krieg, 10/3)


Stat:
A Supreme Court Announcement Packed With Covid-19 Red Flags


The flags are so red they might as well be wailing like sirens. As more people in and around the White House test positive for the virus that causes Covid-19, no event is being more scrutinized than the Rose Garden event last Saturday, where President Trump announced the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. That gathering, as videos and photos of it make clear, violated so many of the recommendations that everyone else has been told to adopt this year. (Joseph, 10/3)


CNN:
Inside Amy Coney Barrett’s White House Reception


Since President Donald Trump announced his positive Covid-19 test, public attention has centered on the Rose Garden ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court announcement and how a number of its attendees have since tested positive. But there was also a smaller, private reception inside the White House — one that did not include wearing masks and did not include social distancing. After the public event, dozens of attendees gathered inside the White House’s Diplomatic Reception Room and the adjoining hallway. The reception lasted between 30 and 45 minutes, one source with knowledge of the event told CNN.CNN is told the attendees did not wear masks, and pictures of the event show no social distancing. (Bash and Bohn, 10/4)

Contract tracing continues for his fundraising event in Bedminster, New Jersey —


AP:
NJ Officials Contact 206 People At Trump Event At Bedminster


State health officials in New Jersey have contacted more than 200 people who attended a campaign fundraiser at the Trump National Golf Course in Bedminster on Thursday, hours before the president announced he had COVID-19, as they try to contain the spread of the deadly virus. Somerset County officials were meanwhile contacting employees who worked the event, most of whom live in the county. In a joint statement issued Sunday, the officials asked guests and employees to monitor their symptoms and, if they were close to President Trump or his staff, to quarantine for 14 days. (Dale, 10/4)

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White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump’s Thursday fundraiser events

The White House provided New Jersey health officials with a list of at least 206 people who attended President Trump’s fundraiser events in Bedminster, N.J., last Thursday, officials said on Sunday.



a man standing in front of a tree: White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump's Thursday fundraiser events


© Getty Images
White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump’s Thursday fundraiser events

The New Jersey Department of Health said in a joint statement with the Somerset County Department of Health that it reached out to all of the individuals who attended the events hours before the president tested positive for COVID-19.

The agencies said they received the list from the White House and the management of the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster.

The state health department made attendees “aware of possible exposure and recommend that they self-monitor for symptoms and quarantine if they were in close contact with the President and his staff.”

County health officials are conducting interviews with staff members at the golf club and analyzing how much contact each had with the president and his staff and “providing public health recommendations accordingly.”

The statement notes that contact tracing is “ongoing,” and the majority of the club’s staff lives within Somerset County. New Jersey officials said they were told the federal government is also conducting contact tracing.

Video: Dr. Ashish Jha: ‘Would not recommend’ gathering of senators for SCOTUS confirmation right now (MSNBC)

Dr. Ashish Jha: ‘Would not recommend’ gathering of senators for SCOTUS confirmation right now

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The state and county health officials recommended attendees who want to get tested wait at least five to seven days after Thursday.

“While the risk is low, a negative test earlier than that time cannot definitively rule out that COVID-19 will not develop,” the joint statement said.

But officials called on those “who are concerned that they were in close contact should quarantine for 14 days.”

A list provided to The Washington Post on Saturday by the Republican National Committee (RNC) included 207 attendees at Trump’s golf club, with about two dozen in a small roundtable inside with the president. Several of the small roundtable members took pictures with Trump.

The RNC distributed an email to attendees saying they should contact their doctors “if you or any of your loved ones

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