Designers reimagine New England ski house decor to create a modern ‘man cave’ up north

Josh E. Linder and Thomas Henry Egan III liken reaching Rangeley, Maine, to a trek to the North Pole. The designers, principals of Boston-based Evolve Residential, drove up in Linder’s hybrid right before the pandemic to install the finishing touches on a client’s new home. “It was a long, slow ascent up a mountain on black ice with fresh powder on top,” Linder said. “We didn’t see any other cars, just a tractor carrying logs barreling at us.”



a living room filled with furniture and a fireplace: evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom


© Sean Litchfield
evolve-residential-rangeley-maine-mudroom

It turns out there is a less precarious route; reassuring given the region gets an annual snowfall of 200-plus inches. Linder and Egan’s clients, a Cambridge family of five, purchased the four-bedroom home last year, primarily to take advantage of the snowmobiling trails that crisscross the area, which also boasts a series of lakes. “The views are showstopping,” Egan said. “There are towering pines, and everything is covered in snow.”

The house, however, was nothing special. Although nestled in the trees on a hill, the structure itself was essentially charmless. “It was a 1980s developer house in the most pristine natural setting,” Linder said. The first step was to remove the unsightly pressure-treated wood deck, which wrapped from front to back. To replace it, Egan designed a wide, covered front porch inspired by the Adirondack-style cottages that dot the area. “It needed a defining architectural feature,” he explained. “Now it looks homey and warm.”

The revamped façade, now stylish and welcoming, set the tone for the interior scheme. While the whole family convenes here from time to time, the husband, teenage sons, and their friends visit most often. The directive was that the rooms feel relaxed. The décor was not to echo that of the stylish summer home the firm designed for the family on Massachusetts’ South Coast. “We had to reinvent the concept of a ‘man cave,’ ” Egan said.

The question became how to infuse their signature vibrancy into spaces that felt laid back and approachable. “It had to be tamer overall — less colorful and not too primped,” Linder said. The solution was to embrace the color blue and lean into natural materials, including fir, birch, leather, and jute. “Navy can go in many directions, but at the end of the day, it’s a masculine color,” Egan said. “The house had to be comfortable for men from the moment they entered.”

Knowing everyone would enter from the side door, the designers turned the mudroom area into a cozy place to hang out. Two George Smith chairs that came from the wife’s parents are at the ready in front of a cast-iron wood stove against a new stacked-granite wall. The storage — baskets and hooks and a live-edge wood bench — happens behind them. “You can relax on the chairs while you warm your feet; it’s not just a repository for wet clothing and shoes,” Egan said.

In addition to dressing up the space with local stone and woodwork painted Benjamin Moore’s “Hale Navy,” the designers

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Boris Johnson apologises after he’s left fumbling over pub garden rules in north-east England



Ralf Baumeister wearing a suit and tie


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Boris Johnson was left fumbling when asked if he could clarify regulations on pub gardens in north east England amid confusion over the rules.

Tough restrictions banning “indoor mixing between households in any setting” are being enforced on Tuesday evening to help curb the spread of coronavirus in a number of areas.

“Boris Johnson left fumbling as he’s quizzed on local lockdown rules in north-east England”

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Asked to clarify whether the restrictions extend to pub gardens, the Prime Minister tied himself in knots, seemingly referring to the rule of six.

He said: “On the rule of six, outside the areas such as the north east where extra measures have been brought in, it’s six inside, six outside.

“And in the north east or other areas where extra tight measures have been brought in, you should follow the guidance of the local authorities.

“But it is six in a home, six in hospitality, but as I understand it, not six outside. That is the situation there.”

Labour deputy leader Angela Rayner branded Mr Johnson “grossly incompetent”. “For the Prime Minister to not understand his own rules is grossly incompetent,” she said.

“These new restrictions are due to come into force across huge parts of the country tonight. The Government needs to get a grip.”

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Mr Johnson later apologised. In a Tweet following his speech, he said: “Apologies, I misspoke today.”

He added: “In the North East, new rules mean you cannot meet people from different households in social settings indoors, including in pubs, restaurants and your home. You should also avoid socialising with other households outside.

“This is vital to control the spread of coronavirus and keep everyone safe. If you are in a high risk area, please continue to follow the guidelines from local authorities.”

The Department for Health and Social Care was approached for comment but no explanation was available.

However, while it is understood that pub and restaurants are not covered by the new legal restrictions, it is against Government “guidance” to meet people from other households in those settings in affected areas.

“This applies to inside and outside of the affected areas. Examples of public venues include pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centres, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions,” the guidance says.

It comes after both Downing Street and education minister Gillian Keegan were unable to say whether households could mix in pub and restaurant gardens under the new regulations.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “The Department of Health are setting out the full details of the steps they announced last night later on today.”

Pressed about the confusion, the spokesman added: “It is the

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Minister doesn’t know whether it’s legal to meet a friend in a pub garden in locked down North East England

A MINISTER caused confusion this morning after she was unable to say if new laws banning people from meeting friends from different households would apply outside.

In a chaotic interview today Gillian Keegan said she didn’t know whether people were still allowed to meet up with others outside from tomorrow, when the locked down North East faces an even tougher crackdown.

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Gillian Keegan today couldn't confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

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Gillian Keegan today couldn’t confirm whether the fines will apply to pub gardens

Parts of the North East of England including Sunderland, Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland will be outlawed from popping around to visit a friend for a cup of tea, or seeing their parents for lunch out in any public setting, Matt Hancock said yesterday.

As The Sun exclusively revealed, it means they will face fines for breaking the rules, and possibly get a criminal record.

But Ms Keegan was today unable to say whether friends could meet up in a pub garden, or other outdoor settings such as a park.

She told Radio 4’s Today programme: “Sorry I can’t answer that question, I don’t represent the North East… I didn’t want to make a mistake”.

The Chicester MP said: “I’m sorry, I can’t clarify that.

“I just don’t have the details of those seven areas.”

The Department of Health confirmed to The Sun today that people will only face fines if they meet with others in indoor settings.

The North East’s guidance says that people should not socialise with people they don’t live with in any public space – meaning pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops or elsewhere.

The household mixing rules will be put into law as of 00.01 tomorrow.

The level of fines is not yet clear.

 

People in the North East will be fined for visiting others in their own homes, Matt Hancock reveals

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