Watch: New York woman finds empty apartment behind bathroom mirror

March 5 (UPI) — A New York woman investigating a hole behind her bathroom mirror went through the proverbial looking glass and made a startling discovery — an entire empty apartment.

Samantha Hartsoe, who chronicled her discovery in a series of TikTok videos, said she was investigating the source of a cold draft in her Roosevelt Island apartment, and she tracked the blowing air to her bathroom mirror.

Hartsoe removed the mirror and discovered it was hiding a large, square hole into a dark room.

“Curiosity killed the cat, curiosity is going to kill me,” Hartsoe recalled thinking in an interview with NBC New York. “I can’t not know what’s on the other side of my bathroom.”

Hartsoe climbed through the opening and discovered the room was part of a two-story vacant apartment. She said she explored the whole residence, finding only trash bags, an uninstalled toilet and an empty water bottle.

“I was kind of expecting there to be somebody, especially with the water bottle being there,” Hartsoe told Curbed.

Hartsoe said she made sure the door to the unfinished apartment was locked before making her way back to her own residence. She said the front door to the vacant domicile was located elsewhere in the apartment complex from her own home.

She said she contacted maintenance to patch the hole in her bathroom and a representative from the management office is expected to visit her apartment soon to investigate her discovery.

Source Article

Read more

20,000 empty chairs set up outside White House on COVID-19 Remembrance Day

Nearly 210,000 lives have been lost to the coronavirus in the United States, and on Sunday, the first National COVID-19 Remembrance Day, a powerful installation was set up outside the White House to represent the toll the pandemic has taken on the nation. Twenty-thousand empty chairs were lined up on the Ellipse, a large lawn outside of the White House. Each one stands for 10 lives lost to COVID-19.

The organization COVID Survivors for Change set up the chairs and also live-streamed a program of “advocacy, art and real people’s stories.” The event was hosted by Grammy Award-winner and former U.S. Ambassador for Health Dionne Warwick, CBS affiliate WUSA reports.

Speakers included family members of those who have died from COVID-19, as well as survivors and frontline workers. 

20,000 Empty Chairs Placed Near White House To Remember 200,000 Lives Lost To COVID-19
20,000 empty chairs were set up outside the White House on Oct. 4, 2020, each representing 10 Americans who have died from COVID-19.

TASOS KATOPODIS / Getty Images


One of the speakers was Konah Bernard, whose mother, Dr. Maima Darbah Fahnbulleh, died from COVID-19 after contracting the virus in a nursing home in May, WUSA reports.

Bernard also shared her 73-year-old mother’s story with WUSA’s Jess Arnold, and described the day she had to say goodbye to her mom over Zoom. “I remember that dreadful morning,” Bernard said. “Time just stopped.”

Dr. Fahnbulleh, who was born in Liberia, “was a very vibrant person,” Bernard said. She received her Ph.D. in social work from Howard University, and had masters degrees in social work and public health, WUSA reported. 

“She spent most of her life advocating for people with disabilities, speaking for the disenfranchised and the people who didn’t really have a voice,” her daughter said.

The installation of 20,000 empty chairs was meant to serve as a wake-up call to the White House, WUSA reports. The event organizers and speakers like Bernard want the government to develop a national plan for safety and recovery. 

20,000 Empty Chairs Placed Near White House To Remember 200,000 Lives Lost To COVID-19
Empty chairs representing the 200,000 lives lost due to the coronavirus pandemic are set up for National COVID-19 Remembrance Day on the Ellipse behind the White House on October 4, 2020 in Washington, D.C.

TASOS KATOPODIS / Getty Images


“I think education and consistency is the main thing,” Bernard said. 

CBS News has reached out to COVID Survivors for Change for more information and is awaiting response. 

Source Article

Read more

Dems in Key House Races Fear Loss of Critical Student Votes With College Campuses Empty

In a COVID-less world, Dylan Taylor would be in East Lansing now, spending his free time at a table outside the dorms at Michigan State University beckoning fellow Spartans to register to vote. Instead, the 19-year-old treasurer of the MSU Young Democrats is stuck living with his parents in the Detroit suburb of Madison Heights, attending classes via Zoom and trying to replicate election-year campus activism remotely with concepts like “Friend Banking.” “You text people you know and ask them, ‘Are you registered to vote?'” he says. “It is a skewed sample. Everyone says, ‘I’m already registered.’ And then I’m done. It is a lot less effective than being on campus.”



a group of people sitting at a park: Sparsely populated college campuses due to COVID limitations on in-person learning could prove problematic for some Democratic Congressional candidates who rely on student votes and campaign volunteers to help them get elected.


© Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images
Sparsely populated college campuses due to COVID limitations on in-person learning could prove problematic for some Democratic Congressional candidates who rely on student votes and campaign volunteers to help them get elected.

For Democrats in tough House races across the nation who were counting on students from nearby colleges to work as campaign volunteers and to vote, not having Dylan and people like him on campus is a looming political problem. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, nearly half of American college and universities are offering entirely or mostly virtual classes this fall according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, thereby scattering millions of students who might have been cajoled into voting for the first time and then motivated to support Democrats through peer pressure and appearances from big-name campaign surrogates. Polls consistently show college students skew Democratic by a 70-30 percent margin—the exact percentage, in fact, who said they planned to vote for Joe Biden in a poll of 4,000 students enrolled in four-year colleges by the Knight Foundation this August. So the absence of on-campus organizing is widely seen as an advantage for Republicans.

“That’s a really big deal for my

Read more

Soup Kitchen fundraiser becomes ‘Empty’ Empty Bowls for 2020 | Western Colorado

To mark the 25th anniversary of Empty Bowls, Grand Valley Catholic Outreach wanted to go bigger.

The annual Soup Kitchen fundraiser with ceramic bowls made by local artists and gourmet soup from area restaurants has become an event many in the valley look forward to each October.

“We brainstormed how we might do it, but when you have over 1,000 people and bowls of soup and social distancing … there was just no way we could do it,” said Beverly Lampley, director of development and communication for Catholic Outreach.

In addition, 2020 and COVID-19 rules haven’t been so kind to area restaurants. The local artists who usually donate bowls haven’t been throwing as much this year. Catholic Outreach didn’t want Empty Bowls to burden them, Lampley said.

This year the fundraiser has become “Empty” Empty Bowls. Tickets are $25, and are a “reminder that people are hungry in our valley even though this year we can’t have an event,” Lampley said.

The Soup Kitchen offers lunch six days a week, free to anyone who is hungry. Each year it serves an average of 67,000 meals, according to catholicoutreach.org.

Earlier this year, the Soup Kitchen’s numbers increased a little, then decreased again, Lampley said. “We anticipate that when it gets cold again, they will increase again.”

Lampley has been pleased with the support “Empty” Empty Bowls has received so far. “It makes you feel good that everyone responds to the need and that’s what just surprised me in a way,” she said.

As for the 25th anniversary celebration for Empty Bowls, that will happen in 2021 instead and area potters are already making bowls, Lampley said.

In the meantime, tickets for “Empty” Empty Bowls are available through Oct. 10 at Catholic Outreach’s main office at 245 S. First St.

To learn about Catholic Outreach and the Soup Kitchen, go to catholicoutreach.org.

Source Article

Read more