With the President hospitalized, more Covid cases emerge in White House and campaign

President Donald Trump was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center early Friday evening less than 24 hours after news broke of his Covid-19 diagnosis, plunging the country into a deepening crisis as the circle of current and former aides to the President testing positive rapidly widened.



a large building: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 02: A view of the White House on Friday evening after U.S. President Donald Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 02: A view of the White House on Friday evening after U.S. President Donald Trump left the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for coronavirus. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

By early Saturday, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and the President’s campaign manager Bill Stepien had both tested positive, which followed the positive diagnoses of two US senators who had attended Trump’s Supreme Court nomination announcement last weekend, and Trump senior adviser Hope Hicks on Thursday.

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It was a remarkably fast escalation of the virus’ threat — which the President has long downplayed — from an infection that caused him mild symptoms, to a fever to then being airlifted to the hospital, all while spreading quickly throughout the government and his campaign.

Shortly before midnight, the President’s physician, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley finally gave an update on the President’s condition, saying in a memo that the President is “doing very well” and has not required any supplemental oxygen, but that doctors have initiated the antiviral drug remdesivir, which has been shown to shorten recovery time for some coronavirus patients.

Conley added that he had recommended the President’s movement from the White House to Walter Reed earlier Friday in consultation with specialists from both Walter Reed and Johns Hopkins University.

Around the same time, Trump tweeted: “Going well, I think! Thank you to all. LOVE!!!”

Trump’s diagnosis — followed by his move to Walter Reed, where the White House said he plans to stay and work for “the next few days” — presented the most serious known health threat to the US presidency since former President Ronald Reagan was non-fatally shot in 1981.

The decision to take Trump to the hospital marked a sharp turn from the statement Conley made early Friday when he first confirmed the Covid-19 diagnosis of Trump and first lady Melania Trump, and said the couple would remain at the White House during their convalescence.

Wearing a suit and mask, Trump, who’s 74, gave a low-key wave to the press but took no questions as he walked without assistance across the South Lawn of the White House to Marine One, the helicopter that airlifted him to the hospital. He left for Walter Reed after receiving a dose of the experimental medical treatment Regeneron — which may have signaled a rising level of concern among his physicians, Dr. Jonathan Reiner, CNN medical analyst and professor at George Washington University, told CNN on Friday.

Though White House staff claimed the President made the move “out of an

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One People, One House: Goodwill, hope emerge in Elms’ urban education effort

Editor’s note: This viewpoint is part of The Republican’s continuing series, One People, One House, a community dialogue on where we are today on the issues of racism and policing across the country and here at home.

On July 26, as the body of Congressman John Lewis crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge one last time, America faced an inescapable historical moment. The country is coming to grips with the realization that racial hierarchy, one of the pillars of American society since colonial time, is no longer acceptable.

The majority of the country believes that people should no longer be apportioned more or less life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, based on their race. This is a very hopeful moment for the United States and, all across the country, people are sowing the seeds for a more equitable society. Elms College was ahead of the trend. We have been working on this effort for more than two years.

But before I share what we are doing at Elms College, it is relevant to examine how the nation got to this crossroad. The perspectives that I can offer are those of a Black immigrant and an educator.

I grew up Black and proud of it. America taught me to be a person of color and defensive about it. That evolution may be helpful in providing a different perspective on the issue of race in the United States.

Everyone was Black in my hometown in Haiti. My classmates and I learned proudly about Haiti as the first Black republic. We knew about the Haitian revolution as the only successful slave rebellion, and we could narrate its story: Black men and women, armed with just their machetes and their righteous anger, rising from the dehumanizing conditions in which they had been shackled for decades to dispossess, defeat, and expel their white oppressors and the most powerful European army of the time.

We were not deterred by the international rap on Haiti. We understood that the Haitian revolution would never be condoned by the global community because it was the ultimate threat to the idea of racial superiority. That’s how I grew up contextualizing my Blackness.

I came to America as a college student and learned that in this multiracial society, I am a person of color. I don’t know when I started to feel self-conscious about that label. My first encounters with overt racism were not pleasant but to a certain extent they did not phase me because I had read or been told about similar situations: feeling actively unwelcomed as the only Black person in a restaurant in downtown Jefferson City, Missouri, or being stopped by a police officer who called the white family that I was going to visit to verify that they were expecting me.

What was unsettling is the discomfort that crept insidiously, little by little, with every news story of crime and criminality assigned to Black men, with the war on drugs being waged primarily against communities of

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